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I'm updating an older html page with CSS, which I've just started getting into. The new version looks good, but there are huge empty spaces now at the bottom and right of the page when the user scrolls.

The nature of the page is several different content boxes, all of which have graphical backgrounds.

The old method I was using was to use a large table to organize the layout and give the table one large, solid background image. A colleague pointed out this was too old-school and suggested I try learning divs and css.

The newer version I produced broke each box up into separate divs and images and positioned them absolutely, but there was no way to keep the content centered if the browser window was resized.

I redid the whole page again, this time using relative positioning and one main container div that I could center. Everything looks good and stays centered, but now I'm getting big blank spaces on the bottom and right sides because of the positioning.

I've seen some people say they've fixed this by using a negative margin, but it doesn't seem to be having any effect on my page (unless I'm putting it in the wrong spot).

I need to know if there's a specific way to fix this that I don't know about or if I'm just going about the whole page completely the wrong way. How can I get my elements lined up correctly, centered, and with no extra scroll space? Should I just go back to using a table?

Here's a simplified version of the page with the content taken out (just the layout):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<meta charset="utf-8">

<style type="text/css">
  body
    {
    background-color: black;
    margin-bottom: -2000px;
    }

  div.main
    {
    width: 1100px;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    margin-bottom: -2000px;
    }

  div.logo
    {
    position: relative;
    left: 40px;
    top: 60px;
    z-index: 1;
    }

  div.window1
    {
    position: relative;
    left: 320px;
    top: -555px;
    z-index: 1;
    }

  div.window2
    {
    position: relative;
    left: 320px;
    top: -580px;
    z-index: 1;
    }

  div.window3
    {
    position: relative;
    left: 680px;
    top: -1250px;
    z-index: 2;
    }

  div.window4
    {
    position: relative;
    left: 25px;
    top: -1570px;
    z-index: 1;
    }

</style>

<div class="main">
  <div class="logo">
    <img src="images/logo8.png">
  </div>

  <div class="window1">
    <img src="images/window1_fullsize.png">
  </div>

  <div class="window2">
    <img src="images/window2_fullsize.png">
  </div>

  <div class="window3">
    <img src="images/window3_fullsize.png">
  </div>

  <div class="window4">
    <img src="images/window4_fullsize.png">
  </div>
</div>

</html>
share|improve this question

You could use "em" or "%" values for top and left.

But the best be to handle this using JS.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Could you give me any more specifics about what you would change exactly? If I set the left and right margins to anything but "auto" I lose the centering. What javascript would have the effect I want? – Fiend Dec 5 '13 at 3:27
    
See margin: auto; only works if the element has a fixed width. Why don't you give getbootstrap.com a try. I am at work right now, but have created a jsfiddle jsfiddle.net/4nFbS and will update the code here. you can also update there if you want anything – Harsain Dec 5 '13 at 3:33
    
Thanks again. I checked out Bootstrap, but I'm a little confused about what it is or how to use it. Is it a program? It doesn't seem to come with an executable. I'm not sure what you mean about the fixed width - my main div does have a fixed width already. The jsfiddle is cool, but I'm a little unclear about its purpose - it looks like the same html that I already had. Which part is different? – Fiend Dec 6 '13 at 20:17
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I fixed this some time ago. I eventually did go back to using a table for the layout (which I understand is frowned upon) combined with a little bit of relative positioning, but I made sure everything was done with css and was w3 compliant:

http://www.burningfreak.com

The inherent problem, I think, is the way I designed my older pages, visually. They were highly graphical and usually made up of one contiguous background image, with a lot of art making up the section borders, etc. The general layouts tended to be unusual shapes, and I would then over-lay text and content on top on that. Unfortunately, it's very difficult to get looking right if the sections are separated.

I've since designed newer pages using only divs and css and it seems to work well, although it's a bit trickier to get working. The key, I think, is to come up with a look and style that I know is going to work using that technique from the start.

share|improve this answer

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