Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I match an alpha character with a regular expression. I want a character that is in \w but is not in \d. I want it unicode compatible that's why I cannot use [a-zA-Z].

share|improve this question
1  
"unicode compatible" - does that mean that you want to match both e and é, for example? –  Seth Jan 10 '10 at 23:46
    
In Python, remember that to indicate a unicode string you must use this: u'Unicode string here' - given that have you tried str.find() where str is your unicode string? –  Alex Jan 11 '10 at 0:11
2  
What I meant was that I wanted to match a,é,あ,日나 but not 1, . (dot), 9, 9, 。 etc. for example. –  Ore Jan 11 '10 at 8:23
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Your first two sentences contradict each other. "in \w but is not in \d" includes underscore. I'm assuming from your third sentence that you don't want underscore.

Using a Venn diagram on the back of an envelope helps. Let's look at what we DON'T want:

(1) characters that are not matched by \w (i.e. don't want anything that's not alpha, digits, or underscore) => \W
(2) digits => \d
(3) underscore => _

So what we don't want is anything in the character class [\W\d_] and consequently what we do want is anything in the character class [^\W\d_]

Here's a simple example (Python 2.6).

>>> import re
>>> rx = re.compile("[^\W\d_]+", re.UNICODE)
>>> rx.findall(u"abc_def,k9")
[u'abc', u'def', u'k']

Further exploration reveals a few quirks of this approach:

>>> import unicodedata as ucd
>>> allsorts =u"\u0473\u0660\u06c9\u24e8\u4e0a\u3020\u3021"
>>> for x in allsorts:
...     print repr(x), ucd.category(x), ucd.name(x)
...
u'\u0473' Ll CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER FITA
u'\u0660' Nd ARABIC-INDIC DIGIT ZERO
u'\u06c9' Lo ARABIC LETTER KIRGHIZ YU
u'\u24e8' So CIRCLED LATIN SMALL LETTER Y
u'\u4e0a' Lo CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-4E0A
u'\u3020' So POSTAL MARK FACE
u'\u3021' Nl HANGZHOU NUMERAL ONE
>>> rx.findall(allsorts)
[u'\u0473', u'\u06c9', u'\u4e0a', u'\u3021']

U+3021 (HANGZHOU NUMERAL ONE) is treated as numeric (hence it matches \w) but it appears that Python interprets "digit" to mean "decimal digit" (category Nd) so it doesn't match \d

U+2438 (CIRCLED LATIN SMALL LETTER Y) doesn't match \w

All CJK ideographs are classed as "letters" and thus match \w

Whether any of the above 3 points are a concern or not, that approach is the best you will get out of the re module as currently released. Syntax like \p{letter} is in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Despite the quirks you mention I think I can start from here and see what can I tune. –  Ore Jan 11 '10 at 8:18
add comment

What about:

\p{L}

You can to use this document as reference: Unicode Regular Expressions

EDIT: Seems Python doesn't handle Unicode expressions. Take a look into this link: Handling Accented Characters with Python Regular Expressions -- [A-Z] just isn't good enough

Another references:

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you but I cannot know wether a character is a (CJK)punctuation symbol or a numeric symbol other than 0-9 if I do a range like \u00E9-\u00F8. –  Ore Jan 10 '10 at 23:55
    
you can work with letter ranges, if you refer to a document like tamasoft.co.jp/en/general-info/unicode.html and to pick all letters interval (that could be boring...); this link can also help you: kourge.net/projects/regexp-unicode-block –  Rubens Farias Jan 11 '10 at 0:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.