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I have this module, called dataviz, which I installed using python setup.py develop and is located:

In [4]: dataviz.__file__

Out[4]: '/home/obot/gscripts/gscripts/general/dataviz.py'

But I'm getting an error in this file: /nas3/yeolab/Software/Python-2.7.5/lib/python2.7/site-packages/gscripts-0.1.4-py2.7.egg/gscripts/general/dataviz.pyc, in the heatmap function, on this line:

--> 321         heatmap_ax.yaxis.set_ticks_position('center')

But when I do dataviz.heatmap??, it points me to /home/obot/gscripts/gscripts/general/dataviz.py and the corresponding line is:

    heatmap_ax.yaxis.set_ticks_position('left')

Do you know what's going on?

EDIT:

I added %load_ext autoreload and that seemed to have fixed things and properly reloaded. Also this module doesn't dreload properly, it crashes and then I have to restart my kernel which was totally the point of running dreload in the first place, so I could keep all my variables =\

So that seemed to have fixed it.. for now.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is nothing special about setup.py develop in terms of imports. All it does is add the source location to sys.path instead of copying files into site-packages.

You are seeing inconsistencies is due to how tracebacks are shown. Python doesn't store the entire file contents in memory when it imports. However, the compiled version of the code that it does store includes things like references to the filename and line number. Python uses this information to construct things like tracebacks, and IPython also uses it for inspection such as object?? output.

Starting with the file foo.py:

def bar(a):
    return 1/a

We can import this into IPython:

In [1]: import foo

In [2]: foo.bar(1)
Out[2]: 1

In [3]: foo.bar(0)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
ZeroDivisionError                         Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-3-1db308259005> in <module>()
----> 1 foo.bar(0)

/Users/minrk/dev/ip/nbviewer/foo.py in bar(a)
      1 def bar(a):
----> 2     return 1/a
      3 

ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

The traceback is constructed by locating the file and reading line number information from the compiled objects:

In [4]: foo.__file__
Out[4]: 'foo.py'

In [5]: foo.bar.__code__.co_firstlineno
Out[5]: 1

If we change the file on disk, it doesn't change the line number references in memory, because the module has not been reloaded. For instance, let's add a docstring:

def bar(a):
    """This docstring definitely doesn't raise ZeroDivisionError"""
    return 1/a

Now we can make the same call again, but the traceback will find the same line where the exception was, not where it would be in the new file:

In [6]: foo.bar(0)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
ZeroDivisionError                         Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-6-1db308259005> in <module>()
----> 1 foo.bar(0)

/Users/minrk/dev/ip/nbviewer/foo.py in bar(a)
      1 def bar(a):
----> 2     """This docstring definitely doesn't raise ZeroDivisionError"""
      3     return 1/a

ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

But if we reload the file, the in-memory representation will be back in sync with the file:

In [7]: reload(foo)
Out[7]: <module 'foo' from 'foo.py'>

In [8]: foo.bar(0)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
ZeroDivisionError                         Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-8-1db308259005> in <module>()
----> 1 foo.bar(0)

/Users/minrk/dev/ip/nbviewer/foo.py in bar(a)
      1 def bar(a):
      2     """This docstring definitely doesn't raise ZeroDivisionError"""
----> 3     return 1/a

ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

I see you already found dreload and %autoreload. I can't help with "it crashes", but often a simple explicit reload is much simpler and more reliable than dreload, especially when working with a single file. But you might try this slightly more conservative approach:

In [12]: %load_ext autoreload

In [13]: %autoreload 1

In [14]: %aimport foo

which should only automatically reload the modules you have explicitly asked it to with %aimport.

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