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I'm hoping someone can shed some light on where I am going wrong with pointers.. I've read countless web pages and tried various things but for some reason my code is returning jibberish (which I'm guessing may be the memory addresses instead of the data within my array). The purpose of the program is to create an array of 100 elements on the heap, pass this array by a pointer to a function (along with two integer variables start and end); a new array will be created on the heap (this comprises of a chunk of the original array using the start and end variables) and the pointer to this array is passed back to the main method so that the new array can be outputted. My problem is not only is the output seeming to be the location not the value, but also it seems 100 values are outputted not 20 as should be expected. I've spent hours trying to figure out where I have gone wrong and just when I think I understand the concept of pointers my faith is destroyed by red squigglies and incorrect outputs. Please HELP! My code is as follows:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>
using namespace std;

double* getSubArray(double*, int, int);// Declare a function that will get the sub array

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    const int size = 100;// Declare the size of the array
    double* pA;// Declare the variable to hold the pointers to the data in array
    double* pB;

    int start = 15;
    int end = 35;

    pA = new double[size];// Create space for the array
    srand(clock());// Seed the program to the computers current time so that random gets a different set of random numbers everytime it is run

// Use a for loop to traverse through each element of the array (starting at index 0) placing a number defined by the random function that is no higher than 250
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        pA[i] = rand()%250;
    }

cout << "An Array of 100 numbers is created and stored in the heap, these values are:" << endl;
// Output the Array for the user to see
for (int j = 0; j < size; j++)
{
    // Place 10 numbers on each line
    if (j % 10 == 0)
    {
        cout << endl;
    }
    cout << *(pA + j) << " ";
}

cout << endl << "The program will build a second array using the data between the indexes " << start << " & " << end << endl;

pB = getSubArray(pA, start, end);// Pass the data to the method

// Output second array for user to compare
for (int k = 0; k < size; k++)
{
    // Place 10 numbers on each line
    if (k % 10 == 0)
    {
        cout << endl;
    }
    cout << *(pB + k) << " ";
}

system("pause");


return 0;
}

double* getSubArray(double* pA, int start, int end)
{
    double* pB = new double[end-start];// Declare space in the heap for the new array whoes size is the size of the criteria given

for (int i = 0; i < (end - start); i++)
{
    for (int j = start; j < end; j++)
    {
        *(pB + 0) = pA[j];
    }
}
return pB;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
*(pB + 0) = pA[j];

That keeps writing to the first element of the array. Surely you want to write to each element in turn:

for (int i = start; i < end; ++i) {
    pB[i-start] = pA[i];
}

or if you don't want to write your own loop

std::copy(pA+start, pA+end, pB);

Don't forget to delete[] everything you new[] or, to save mucking around with low-level memory management, use std::vector to manage the dynamic arrays for you.

share|improve this answer
    
That works!! .. Kind of.. It seems to keep outputting memory addresses afterwards though –  Holly Marie Batchelor Dec 5 '13 at 11:13
    
Could I implement an if statement in my output to say stop outputting when the size of the array is met (end-start)? Or would this not solve my problem? –  Holly Marie Batchelor Dec 5 '13 at 11:16
    
@HollyMarieBatchelor: No need for an if; just use the right condition in the for statement: loop up to end-start, not size. Apart from that, it works for me: ideone.com/tSn0Ty –  Mike Seymour Dec 5 '13 at 11:16
    
Oh my days! I see that now! size contains 100.. duh.. Thanks ever so much!! –  Holly Marie Batchelor Dec 5 '13 at 11:18

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