Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an ArrayList of Strings, and I want to remove repeated strings from it. How can I do this?

share|improve this question
add comment

18 Answers 18

up vote 229 down vote accepted

If you don't want duplicates in a Collection, you should consider why you're using a Collection that allows duplicates. The easiest way to remove repeated elements is to add the contents to a Set (which will not allow duplicates) and then add the Set back to the ArrayList:

ArrayList al = new ArrayList();
// add elements to al, including duplicates
HashSet hs = new HashSet();
hs.addAll(al);
al.clear();
al.addAll(hs);

Of course, this destroys the ordering of the elements in the ArrayList.

share|improve this answer
53  
See also LinkedHashSet, if you wish to retain the order. –  volley Dec 9 '09 at 20:38
    
But this will just create the set without duplicates , I want to know which number was duplicate in O(n) time –  Chetan Mar 29 '12 at 19:43
    
Chetan, finding the items in O(n) is possible if the set of possible values is small (think Byte or Short); a BitSet or similar can then be used to store and look up already encountered values in O(1) time. But then again - with such a small value set, doing it in O(n log n) might not be a problem anyway since n is low. (This comment is not applicable to original poster, who needs to do this with String.) –  volley May 3 '12 at 12:38
2  
A good practice would be to define variables using the interface types List and Set (instead of implementation types ArrayList and HashSet as in your example). –  Jonik Aug 29 '13 at 7:27
1  
You can clean this up by using new HashSet(al) instead of initializing it to empty and calling addAll. –  ashes999 Dec 26 '13 at 12:44
show 2 more comments

Although converting the ArrayList to a HashSet effectively removes duplicates, if you need to preserve insertion order, I'd rather suggest you to use this variant

// list is some List of Strings
Set<String> s = new LinkedHashSet<String>(list);

Then, if you need to get back a List reference, you can use again the conversion constructor.

share|improve this answer
6  
Does LinkedHashSet make any guarantees as to which of several duplicates are kept from the list? For instance, if position 1, 3, and 5 are duplicates in the original list, can we assume that this process will remove 3 and 5? Or maybe remove 1 and 3? Thanks. –  Matt Briançon May 1 '11 at 2:20
6  
@Matt: yes, it does guarantee that. The docs say: "This linked list defines the iteration ordering, which is the order in which elements were inserted into the set (insertion-order). Note that insertion order is not affected if an element is re-inserted into the set." –  abahgat May 2 '11 at 9:00
    
Very interesting. I have a different situation here. I am not trying to sort String but another object called AwardYearSource. This class has an int attribute called year. So I want to remove duplicates based on the year. i.e if there is year 2010 mentioned more than once, I want to remove that AwardYearSource object. How can I do that? –  WowBow Apr 16 '12 at 15:27
    
@WowBow For example you can define Wrapper object which holds AwardYearSource. And define this Wrapper objects equals method based on AwardYearSources year field. Then you can use Set with these Wrapper objects. –  Ondrej Bozek Jun 20 '12 at 12:19
    
@WowBow or implement Comparable/Comparator –  shrini1000 Jan 11 '13 at 5:09
add comment

If you don't want duplicates, use a Set instead of a List. To convert a List to a Set you can use the following code:

// list is some List of Strings
Set<String> s = new HashSet<String>(list);

If really necessary you can use the same construction to convert a Set back into a List.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There is also ImmutableSet from guava-libraries as an option:

ImmutableSet.copyOf(list);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's a way that doesn't affect your list ordering:

ArrayList l1 = new ArrayList();
ArrayList l2 = new ArrayList();

Iterator iterator = l1.iterator();

        while (iterator.hasNext())
        {
            YourClass o = (YourClass) iterador.next();
            if(!l2.contains(o)) l2.add(o);
        }

l1 is the original list, and l2 is the list whithout repeated items (Make sure YourClass has the equals method acording to what you want to stand for equality)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Probably a bit overkill, but I enjoy this kind of isolated problem. :)

This code uses a temporary Set (for the uniqueness check) but removes elements directly inside the original list. Since element removal inside an ArrayList can induce a huge amount of array copying, the remove(int)-method is avoided.

public static <T> void removeDuplicates(ArrayList<T> list) {
    int size = list.size();
    int out = 0;
    {
        final Set<T> encountered = new HashSet<T>();
        for (int in = 0; in < size; in++) {
            final T t = list.get(in);
            final boolean first = encountered.add(t);
            if (first) {
                list.set(out++, t);
            }
        }
    }
    while (out < size) {
        list.remove(--size);
    }
}

While we're at it, here's a version for LinkedList (a lot nicer!):

public static <T> void removeDuplicates(LinkedList<T> list) {
    final Set<T> encountered = new HashSet<T>();
    for (Iterator<T> iter = list.iterator(); iter.hasNext(); ) {
        final T t = iter.next();
        final boolean first = encountered.add(t);
        if (!first) {
            iter.remove();
        }
    }
}

Use the marker interface to present a unified solution for List:

public static <T> void removeDuplicates(List<T> list) {
    if (list instanceof RandomAccess) {
        // use first version here
    } else {
        // use other version here
    }
}

EDIT: I guess the generics-stuff doesn't really add any value here.. Oh well. :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Why use ArrayList in parameter? Why not just List? Will that not work? –  Shervin Nov 12 '09 at 15:54
    
A List will absolutely work as in-parameter for the first method listed. The method is however optimized for use with a random access list such as ArrayList, so if a LinkedList is passed instead you will get poor performance. For example, setting the n:th element in a LinkedList takes O(n) time, whereas setting the n:th element in a random access list (such as ArrayList) takes O(1) time. Again, though, this is probably overkill... If you need this kind of specialized code it will hopefully be in an isolated situation. –  volley Dec 9 '09 at 20:37
    
This is precisely what I needed, thanks –  Jasper Holton Jun 1 at 2:15
add comment

this can solve the problem:

private List<SomeClass> clearListFromDuplicateFirstName(List<SomeClass> list1) {

Map<String, SomeClass> cleanMap = new LinkedHashMap<String, SomeClass>();
for (int i = 0; i < list1.size(); i++) {
     cleanMap.put(list1.get(i).getFirstName(), list1.get(i));
}
List<SomeClass> list = new ArrayList<SomeClass>(cleanMap.values());
return list;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

It is possible to remove duplicates from arraylist without using HashSet or one more arraylist.

Try this code..

    ArrayList<String> lst = new ArrayList<String>();
    lst.add("ABC");
    lst.add("ABC");
    lst.add("ABCD");
    lst.add("ABCD");
    lst.add("ABCE");

    System.out.println("Duplicates List "+lst);

    Object[] st = lst.toArray();
      for (Object s : st) {
        if (lst.indexOf(s) != lst.lastIndexOf(s)) {
            lst.remove(lst.lastIndexOf(s));
         }
      }

    System.out.println("Distinct List "+lst);

Output is

Duplicates List [ABC, ABC, ABCD, ABCD, ABCE]
Distinct List [ABC, ABCD, ABCE]
share|improve this answer
    
It's slow and you might get a ConcurrentModificationException. –  maaartinus Oct 18 '13 at 9:39
    
@maaartinus Have you tried that code ?. It won't produce any exceptions.Also it is pretty fast. I tried the code before posting. –  CarlJohn Oct 18 '13 at 10:35
1  
You're right, it doesn't as you iterate the array instead of the list. However, it's slow like hell. Try it with a few millions elements. Compare it to ImmutableSet.copyOf(lst).toList(). –  maaartinus Oct 18 '13 at 10:49
add comment

When you are filling the ArrayList, use a condition for each element. For example:

    ArrayList< Integer > al = new ArrayList< Integer >(); 

    // fill 1 
    for ( int i = 0; i <= 5; i++ ) 
        if ( !al.contains( i ) ) 
            al.add( i ); 

    // fill 2 
    for (int i = 0; i <= 10; i++ ) 
        if ( !al.contains( i ) ) 
            al.add( i ); 

    for( Integer i: al )
    {
        System.out.print( i + " ");     
    }

We will get an array {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}

share|improve this answer
add comment

In Java 8:

List<String> deduped = list.stream().distinct().collect(Collectors.toList());

Please note that the hashCode-equals contract for list members should be respected for the filtering to work properly.

share|improve this answer
add comment

LinkedHashSet will do the trick.

String[] arr2 = {"5","1","2","3","3","4","1","2"};
Set<String> set = new LinkedHashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(arr2));
for(String s1 : set)
    System.out.println(s1);

System.out.println( "------------------------" );
String[] arr3 = set.toArray(new String[0]);
for(int i = 0; i < arr3.length; i++)
     System.out.println(arr3[i].toString());

//output: 5,1,2,3,4

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to preserve your Order then it is best to use LinkedHashSet. Because if you want to pass this List to an Insert Query by Iterating it, the order would be preserved.

Try this

LinkedHashSet link=new LinkedHashSet();
List listOfValues=new ArrayList();
listOfValues.add(link);

This conversion will be very helpful when you want to return a List but not a Set.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As said before, you should use a class implementing Set interface instead of List to be sure of unicity of elements. If you have to keep the order of elements, the SortedSet interface can then be used ; the TreeSet class implements that interface.

share|improve this answer
add comment
for(int a=0;a<myArray.size();a++){
        for(int b=a+1;b<myArray.size();b++){
            if(myArray.get(a).equalsIgnoreCase(myArray.get(b))){
                myArray.remove(b); 
                dups++;
                b--;
            }
        }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
import java.util.*;
class RemoveDupFrmString
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {

        String s="appsc";

        Set<Character> unique = new LinkedHashSet<Character> ();

        for(char c : s.toCharArray()) {

            System.out.println(unique.add(c));
        }
        for(char dis:unique){
            System.out.println(dis);
        }


    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
public Set<Object> findDuplicates(List<Object> list) {
        Set<Object> items = new HashSet<Object>();
        Set<Object> duplicates = new HashSet<Object>();
        for (Object item : list) {
            if (items.contains(item)) {
                duplicates.add(item);
                } else { 
                    items.add(item);
                    } 
            } 
        return duplicates;
        }
share|improve this answer
add comment
    ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
    HashSet<String> unique = new LinkedHashSet<String>();
    HashSet<String> dup = new LinkedHashSet<String>();
    boolean b = false;
    list.add("Hello");
    list.add("Hello");
    list.add("how");
    list.add("are");
    list.add("u");
    list.add("u");

    for(Iterator iterator= list.iterator();iterator.hasNext();)
    {
        String value = (String)iterator.next();
        System.out.println(value);

        if(b==unique.add(value))
            dup.add(value);
        else
            unique.add(value);


    }
    System.out.println(unique);
    System.out.println(dup);
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you have any control over the creation of your list then you might want to consider using a Map instead? Or you could put them in a Map from your ArrayList.

share|improve this answer
3  
Why would you use a Map and not a Set ? –  Luc Touraille Oct 15 '08 at 8:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.