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I have an 8 membered array which has to be defined conditionally. ie, for each condition, the values of the elements of the array will be different.

However, for each condition, I'd rather not define the elements one by one. Is there any way where I can define all the elements of the array together like this:

double c[8];
if ( a == p ){
    c[]={values} ; 
} else if ( a == q) {
        c[]={values} ; 
} else if (.. ){
        ......
}

instead of

double c[8];
if ( a == p ){
    c[0]= .. ;
    c[1]= .. ;
    ...
    c[7] = ..;
} else if ( a == q) {
    c[0]= .. ;
    c[1]= .. ;
    ...
    c[7] = ..;
} else if ( ... ) {
    ....
}

PS: There are 7 if conditions.

share|improve this question
1  
Perhaps knowing values would assist in solving this one. – Novak Dec 5 '13 at 11:26
    
they are double precision values varying between 1 and -1. eg {0.458401,0.0,0.0206768,-0.0118135,0.115635,-0.0842532,-0.00355449,0.0412016} for one of the cases. – Population Xplosive Dec 5 '13 at 11:43
    
In that case, predefined values arrays are my recommendation. – Novak Dec 5 '13 at 11:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming the values in each branch of the condition are not changing:

Have some value arrays values[NumConditions][8] and making c a pointer. Then:

switch(a) {
    case First: c = values[0]; break;
    case ...
}
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If values are defined on compile-time, you can use std::copy for example.

std::copy(std::begin(values), std::end(values), std::begin(c));
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Prepare 7 arrays (or just a two-dimensional), which will be initialized at compile-time. Then, declare a pointer c. Afterwards, use a switch to select the desired array (i.e. c = valuesList[2]). If you need to write on that array, copy its contents outside of the switch.

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If all initializers for a given condition are the same then you can use class std::array instead of the array. For example

std::array<double, 8> c;

if ( a == p ){
    c.fill( 0 ); 
} else if ( a == q) {
        c.fill( 1 ) ; 
} else if (.. ){
        ......
}
share|improve this answer
    
All the initializers are different. – Population Xplosive Dec 5 '13 at 11:44

IMHO create eight functions which you can give meaningful names that tell the next programmer (or yourself in one year) what the different eight configurations mean.

I admit it is a bit verbose but more importantly it makes the code clearer

if ( a == p )
{
  setConfigValuesForProducingPannkakes(c);
}
else if ( a == q )
{
  setConfigValuesForProducingWaffles(c);
}
...
share|improve this answer
    
I do it in the code. But when I try to post some questions, I try to put it in general terms. – Population Xplosive Dec 5 '13 at 11:58

Much cleaner approach .Use Switch case to avoid unnecessary comparisons

switch( a)
{
case p:
       c[]={value1,valu2,...} ; 

}

This is just an demo how to use:

int main() {

   int choice = 1;

   switch( choice )
   {
        case 1: double c[8] = {0.123,32.33,33.02,66.44,0.11,45.08,44.9,0.0412};
        break;      
   }

   return 0;

}

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work that way. Gives warning: extended initializer lists only available with -std=c++0x or -std=gnu++0x [enabled by default] error: assigning to an array from an initializer list – Population Xplosive Dec 5 '13 at 11:45
    
int main() { int choice = 1; switch( choice ) { case 1: double c[8] = {0.123,32.33,33.02,66.44,0.11,45.08,44.9,0.0412}; break; } return 0; } – Biraj Borah Dec 5 '13 at 11:55
    
@BirajBorah I think you may be getting this error if you are defining the array separately to its initialization. i.e. You have double c[8]; on its own. In this case you would need to use rounded brackets rather than curly brackets to initialize the array: c[8] = (0.123,32.33,33.02,66.44,0.11,45.08,44.9,0.0412);. – Phoen1xUK Dec 5 '13 at 12:11
std::array<double, 8> c;
if (a == p) {
    c = {values};
} else if (a == q) {
    c = {values};
} else if (...) {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

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