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I have the following code:

public class A extends Thread{

static List<String> a = new ArrayList<String>();

private String name;

public A(String name)
{
    this.name = name;
}

public void run() {
         synchronized (A.class) {
                    a.add(this.name);
                }     
    }

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception{

    for(int i=0;i<100;i++)
    {
        A s1 = new A("thread 1");
        A s2 = new A("thread 2");
        A s3 = new A("thread 3");

        s1.start();
        s2.start();
        s3.start();
    }
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        System.out.println("The message is " + a);

}

}

The output I get is:

The message is [thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3, thread 1, thread 2, thread 3]

From the output I don't think so my threads are running parallel!

And I should add concurrent code inside the run method?

Am I missing something here?

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1  
Is not synchronize in run starnge? Is not synchronize on class strange whereas the method is not static? –  arjacsoh Dec 5 '13 at 11:47
    
All the thread does is running its run method, so yes, you should add your concurrent code there. –  Ralf H Dec 5 '13 at 12:03
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3 Answers 3

Your threads only run for a very brief period of time, because run terminates almost immediately. So it's possible, but unlikely, they're running simultaneously. A thread terminates when its run method returns; the run method is not called repeatedly or anything like that.

Of course, since everything you do in run is synchronized on A.class, even if they did run simultaneously, one would block the others while it was doing its addition to the shared list.

If you want to see the effect of threads actually running simultaneously, you'll need to have them keep doing something (perhaps a loop of some kind in run, or use Thread.sleep with a random number of milliseconds), and remove the synchronization (or play with synchronization to see how that affects things). When doing ths, though, do keep synchronizing when calling a.add (best to synchronize on a rather than A.class) even when not synchronizing elsewhere. (Or wrap your list in a Collections.synchronizedList.)

Here's a full example showing threads that do actually overlap with one another:

import java.util.*;

public class ParallelExample extends Thread {

    static List<String> a = new ArrayList<String>();

    private String name;

    public ParallelExample(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void run() {
        // Un-synchronized, random delay, just to let the threads
        // intermix.
        try {
            Thread.sleep((new Random()).nextInt(1000) + 500);
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            // For this example I'm ignoring the InterruptedException
        }

        // Now add the name after that random delay
        synchronized(ParallelExample.class) {
            a.add(this.name);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        ParallelExample threads[] = new ParallelExample[10];

        // Start the threads
        for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; ++i) {
            threads[i] = new ParallelExample("thread " + i);
            threads[i].start();
        }

        // Don't use sleep here, use join
        try {
            for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; ++i) {
                threads[i].join();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            // For this example I'm ignoring the InterruptedException
        }

        // Show results
        System.out.println("The message is " + a);
    }
}

Example run:

$ java ParallelExample 
The message is [thread 4, thread 3, thread 9, thread 7, thread 6, thread 2, thread 5, thread 1, thread 8, thread 0]
share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps the OP could sleep for a random amount of time before entering the synchronized block. –  chrylis Dec 5 '13 at 11:28
    
An addition to this is that since 'a' is a shared resource, it may be wise to surround the piece of code that use 'a' with a synchronized(a) block, to prevent deadlocks. –  halileohalilei Dec 5 '13 at 11:33
    
@halileohalilei: The existing synchronization does that, by synchronizing on A.class. But yes, if removing that, will need to synchronize at least when calling a.add (or use a synchronized list). –  T.J. Crowder Dec 5 '13 at 11:34
    
But if all threads are blocked for run, whats the point of multithreading? Is it same as normal method calls? –  sriram Dec 5 '13 at 11:38
    
The point is to understand how it works. I think it is a nice question and sure thing awesome answer. –  ferrerverck Dec 5 '13 at 11:52
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To see the difference threading makes try the following:

public void run() {
    synchronized (A.class) {
        Thread.sleep(10000);
        a.add(this.name);
   }     
}

Then try the following:

public void run() {
    Thread.sleep(10000);
    synchronized (A.class) {
        a.add(this.name);
   }     
}

Both will produce around the same output (it may vary a little depending on how timings work out) but you will see a massive difference in the total run time.

In each case you spawn 3 threads, each waits 10 seconds and then returns.

In the first case though each thread has to wait for the synchronized block before it can do its processing - so the total run time will be around 30 seconds.

In the second case the total run time will be around 10 seconds.

That's the difference between serial and parallel execution. Imagine that 10 second wait was actually something intensive and you can see how threading could speed things up.

This also demonstrates why getting synchronization right is so important in threading. Don't do it and you can crash your program, corrupt data, and all sorts of other nastiness. Do it too much and you can remove all benefits of threading and even in some cases deadlock your program entirely.

On the other hand though in the right situation it can be very powerful, for example recently I was reprocessing a lot of images, each reprocessing could take anything from 10 seconds to 2 minutes.

By using threads and sending a different Image to each thread I was able to use all the cores on the CPU in order to do the processing. As each Image was separate there was no sychronized block to slow things down. This resulted in a massive performance increase.

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Avoid synchronized block and use non-blocking solution.

Instead of using:

static List<String> a = new ArrayList<String>();
// Now add the name after that random delay
        synchronized(ParallelExample.class) {
            a.add(this.name);
        }

You can use something like this:

private static Queue<String> queue = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<String>();
// Now add the name after that random delay
        queue.offer(this.name);
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