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I have the following situation -

I need to compile my code with two different versions of GCC (3.2 and 4.4) and wish to see all warnings and treat them as errors (it's a slippery slope otherwise). I must include header files I cannot change that include some code. This code makes the newer GCC throw warnings (like unused parameter).

If I add something like

#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-parameter"
#include <bad_header.hpp>
#pragma GCC diagnostic error "-Wunused-parameter"

it solves the issue with the newer GCC but the older one is not familiar with this pragma and issues a warning (which becomes an error).

What can I do?

  1. Stop treating warning as errors
  2. Surround my pragma with some sort of version checking macro

I don't like both solutions, is there anything else I can do?

Update following Sander De Dycker's answer

My build system does not allow me to use -isystem flag with gcc

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1  
You could also cast your unused parameters to (void) to silence the warnings. –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 5 '13 at 14:42
    
... or don't name them in the parameter list. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 5 '13 at 14:48
1  
@FrédéricHamidi: That's fine, unless you're dealing with "header files I cannot change". (Personally, I'd just remove that restriction, but we should probably assume there's a genuine reason not to change them). –  Mike Seymour Dec 5 '13 at 15:01
    
@Mike, true, that detail escaped me at first :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 5 '13 at 15:16
    
@MikeSeymour - removing that restriction will include modifying header files which are probably in use for more than a decade, convincing those responsible for them the change is required and given the code has no unit tests in place - provide a test plan to prove my changes are ok. In addition I'll have to convince my boss that this is worth the effort just to remove a warning. In short - "header files I cannot change". –  Vadim Dec 6 '13 at 5:28

2 Answers 2

Since you only want to suppress warnings from headers you don't control, you can mark those headers as system headers by using -isystem instead of -I, and gcc will no longer generate warnings for them (how gcc treats system headers).

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Thanks, I'll have to check if that's possible in our build system. I'll get back to you. –  Vadim Dec 5 '13 at 18:18
    
Unfortunately, our build system does not allow me to make this change., I'll update my question. Thank you for your answer. –  Vadim Dec 8 '13 at 6:47
    
@Vadim : can you make a minimal modification to those header files by putting #pragma GCC system_header at the top ? This is not a functional change, so no rigorous re-testing should be required. –  Sander De Dycker Dec 8 '13 at 8:16
    
this is something theoretically possible, but the required amount of work (both technical and managerial) is way way too large. It's compiled by different compilers for different OS, and at the very least I'll have to make sure the pragma does not harm anything for them. In addition this pragma will suppress all warnings in this header, which I'm sure is not my place to do. –  Vadim Dec 8 '13 at 9:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The solution I'm going to use for now (until I'll see a better one) is to wrap the GCC diagnostic pragmas with macros to check GCC version, something like

#if (defined __GNUC__) && (__GNUC__ > 3)
    #pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-parameter"
#endif

    #include <bad_header.hpp>

#if (defined __GNUC__) && (__GNUC__ > 3)
    #pragma GCC diagnostic error "-Wunused-parameter"
#endif
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