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I want to "zip" char and list in Python:

An example:

char = '<'
list = [3, 23, 67]

"zip"(char, list) 
 >>> [('<', 3), ('<', 23), ('<', 67)]

How I'm using itertools.repeat():

itertools.izip(itertools.repeat(char, len(list)), list)
>>>[('<', 3), ('<', 23), ('<', 67)]

It works, but it so interesting to find more pythonic solution.

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3  
It's already pythonic, don't worry. What is pythonic again? –  aIKid Dec 5 '13 at 14:45
2  
You can omit second argument for repeat –  alko Dec 5 '13 at 14:46
1  
itertools.izip_longest can be useful here, but the LC version posted by others is much better. –  undefined is not a function Dec 5 '13 at 14:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't need itertools here.

Using list comprehension:

>>> char = '<'
>>> lst = [3, 23, 67]
>>> [(char, n) for n in lst]
[('<', 3), ('<', 23), ('<', 67)]

BTW, don't use list as a variable name. It shadows builtin function list.

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Thank you for example of using. –  viach Dec 5 '13 at 14:52
[(char, i) for i in list]

Naming your list as "list" is probably not a good idea btw., as this shadows the constructor for the internal list type.

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I'm sorry. Yes, I know it, and use name 'list' here for best ilustrating of example. –  viach Dec 5 '13 at 14:48
    
Thank you a lot! –  viach Dec 5 '13 at 14:51

If you want something equivalent to your use of itertools - using lazy generation for iteration - then you can use generator expressions. The syntax is pretty much equivalent to list comprehensions except you enclose the expression with paranthesis.

>>> c = '<'
>>> l = [3, 23, 67]
>>> my_gen = ((c, item) for item in l)
>>> for item in my_gen:
...     print item
...
('<', 3)
('<', 23)
('<', 67)

For more info, here's the PEP that explains it: http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0289/

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If char is only ever going to be reused for all pairings, just use a list comprehension:

>>> [(char, i) for i in lst]
[('<', 3), ('<', 23), ('<', 67)]

If char is a string of characters, and you wanted to cycle through them when pairing (like zip() would for the shortest length sequence), use itertools.cycle():

>>> from itertools import cycle
>>> chars = 'fizz'
>>> lst = range(6)
>>> zip(chars, lst)
[('f', 0), ('i', 1), ('z', 2), ('z', 3)]
>>> zip(cycle(chars), lst)
[('f', 0), ('i', 1), ('z', 2), ('z', 3), ('f', 4), ('i', 5)]

Note how the characters of the string 'fizz' are reused to pair up with the numbers 4 and 5; they'll continue to be cycled to match any length list (which must be finite).

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Thank you for usefull information. –  viach Dec 5 '13 at 14:53

If you really want to use zip, here is how :

l  = [3, 23, 67]
zip('<' * len(l), l)

[('<', 3), ('<', 23), ('<', 67)]

In further details, itertools.repeat(char, len(list)) is quite similar in result to '<' * 3. Also, both work with zip (you could write zip(itertools.repeat(char, len(list)), l)), too).

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