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I am using Ruby on Rails 4 and the rspec-rails gem 2.14. For a my object I would like to compare the current time with the updated_at object attribute after a controller action run, but I am in trouble since the spec does not pass. That is, given the following is the spec code:

it "updates updated_at attribute" do
  Timecop.freeze

  patch :update
  @article.reload
  expect(@article.updated_at).to eq(Time.now)
end

When I run the above spec I get the following error:

Failure/Error: expect(@article.updated_at).to eq(Time.now)

   expected: 2013-12-05 14:42:20 UTC
        got: Thu, 05 Dec 2013 08:42:20 CST -06:00

   (compared using ==)

How can I make the spec to pass?


Note: I tried also the following (note the utc addition):

it "updates updated_at attribute" do
  Timecop.freeze

  patch :update
  @article.reload
  expect(@article.updated_at.utc).to eq(Time.now)
end

but the spec still does not pass (note the "got" value difference):

Failure/Error: expect(@article.updated_at.utc).to eq(Time.now)

   expected: 2013-12-05 14:42:20 UTC
        got: 2013-12-05 14:42:20 UTC

   (compared using ==)
share|improve this question
    
It is comparing the object ids, hence the text from inspect is matching, but underneath you have two different Time objects. You could just use ===, but that may suffer from crossing second boundaries. Probably best is to find or write your own matcher, in which you convert to epoch seconds and allow for a small absolute difference. –  Neil Slater Dec 5 '13 at 14:53
    
If I understood you relating "crossing second boundaries", the problem should not arise since I am using the Timecop gem that "freezes" the time. –  Backo Dec 5 '13 at 14:55
    
Ah I missed that, sorry. In which case, just use === instead of == - currently you are comparing the object_id of two different Time objects. Although Timecop won't freeze database server time . . . so if your timestamps are being generated by the RDBMS it wouldn't work (I expect that is not a problem for you here though) –  Neil Slater Dec 5 '13 at 15:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Ruby Time object maintains greater precision than the database does. When the value is read back from the database, it’s only preserved to microsecond precision, while the in-memory representation is precise to nanoseconds.

If you don't care about millisecond difference, you could do a to_s/to_i on both sides of your expectation

expect(@article.updated_at.utc.to_s).to eq(Time.now.to_s)

or

expect(@article.updated_at.utc.to_i).to eq(Time.now.to_i)

Refer to this for more information about why the times are different

share|improve this answer
    
As you can see in the code from the question, I use the Timecop gem. Should it just solve the issue by "freezing" the time? –  Backo Dec 5 '13 at 15:12
    
You save the time in the database and retrieve it(@article.updated_at) which makes it loose the nanoseconds where as Time.now has retains the nanosecond. It should be clear from the first few lines of my answer –  Vimsha Dec 5 '13 at 16:09

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