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I have gone through so many websites which explains about access specifiers in java such as java papers, java's access specifiers, and many other stackoverflow questions like here.

All these guys explained that the protected member can be accessed by any subclass(also by the subclass out of package) and can be accessed by the package level classes.

While experimenting on protected members, I found out that I'm unable to access a protected member from a subclass outside package.

Check the code below. A public class with protected members:

package com.One;

    public class ProVars {

    protected int i = 900;

    protected void foo()
    {
        System.out.println("foo");
    }

}

Another public class in different package trying to access protected member:

package com.Two;

import com.One.ProVars;

public class AnotherClass extends ProVars {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ProVars p = new ProVars();
        System.out.println(p.i);//the field ProVars.i is not visible(Compilation Error)
                p.foo();//the method foo() from the type ProVars is not visible

    }
}

Any explanation is appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're attempting to use them as if they were public. They are not public, they are protected.

Example

ProVars p = new ProVars();
p.foo(); // This will throw an error because foo() is not public.

The correct usage, for a subclass to use a protected method or variable is:

public class MyClass extends ProVars
{
     public MyClass()
     {
           System.out.println(i); // I can access it like this.
           foo(); // And this.
     }
}

Why does this work?

Because you've inherited the class. That means you've got all of its methods and it's variables. Now, because your method and variable is protected, it also means that it can be accessed from the subclass. Try and declare them as private and see what happens.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the clear explanation. So, we could access protected members in a subclass but can't access them by super class' object. – chaitanya89 Dec 6 '13 at 5:23
    
Correct! Glad you got there :) – christopher Dec 6 '13 at 8:42

Even inside a derived class, you can only access a protected field from a qualifier that is at least of your own type.

Inside AnotherClass, you can access new AnotherClass().i, but not new ProVars().i.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for answering. Your answer is correct but I accepted chris's answer because he elaborated it nicely. Hope you don't mind. – chaitanya89 Dec 6 '13 at 5:13

It would be fine if your main method wasn't static. Static methods don't care about inheritance hence your "extends ProVars" is not going to work. This on the other hand should work:

public class AnotherClass extends ProVars {

public void accessProtected() {
   System.out.println(this.i);
   this.foo();
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    AnotherClass p = new AnotherClass();
    p.accessProtected();
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, It worked for me thanks. upvoted. – chaitanya89 Dec 6 '13 at 5:25

Use the subclass In your main():

public class AnotherClass extends ProVars {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    AnotherClass p = new AnotherClass();
    System.out.println(p.i);
            p.foo();

}

}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it worked. – chaitanya89 Dec 6 '13 at 5:32

You need to change the line ProVars p = new ProVars(); into AnotherClass p = new AnotherClass();

Otherwise, you're still creating an object of type ProVars, and the compiler won't be able to realise the inheritance between AnotherClass and ProVars (which leads to the compilation error).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you're right. – chaitanya89 Dec 6 '13 at 5:25

When we say it is available from subclass, we mean it is available to subclass code. But in your example you are calling protected method from outside.

So while your example does not work, this should

package com.Two;

import com.One.ProVars;

public class AnotherClass extends ProVars {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ProVars p = new ProVars();
    p.test();
}

public test() {
        System.out.println(this.i);)
        this.foo();
}



}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, Your example doesn't work because there's is no method "test()" in ProVars class But if we create object for AnotherClass then it will Work. – chaitanya89 Dec 6 '13 at 5:21

Your code accessing the variables is inside a static method - the static method is not directly part of an object that inherits the protected fields.

Try moving the code to a method inside your AnotherClass class and then calling that method from your static method.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right but actually I was trying to access protected members by the object of superclass. So, even if I move the code to a non-static method, it still gives compilation error. But I could access them directly from a non-static method in a subclass. – chaitanya89 Dec 6 '13 at 5:31

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