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I'm trying to write game nim in Haskell, but something is not working, and I have no idea why. I have 2 functions getRow and getNumber (they both use getInt, which I also included), getRow works the way I want it to, but with getNumber I get sobe error and it doesn't want to load.

getInt :: Int
getInt = do  
  s <- getLine
  read s

getRow :: [Int] -> (Int,Int) 
getRow board = do
  putStrLn "Give me row number "
  row <- getInt
  if ((length board) > (row-1)) && ((board!!(row-1)) > 0 )
    then (row, board!!(row-1))
    else do putStrLn "niepoprawny rzad"
            getRow board

getNumber :: [Int] -> (Int, Int) -> (Int, Int)
getNumber board row = do
  putStrLn "Give me number of stones you want to take"
  number <- getInt
  if number < 1 
    then do putStrLn "wrong number"
            getNumber board row
              else if (number > (snd row)) 
                   then ((fst row), 0)
                   else ((fst row), ((snd row) - number))

In getNumber I get:

 Couldn't match expected type '(Int, Int)' with actual type 'Int' 
 In a stmt of a 'do' block: number <- getInt"

I don't understand any of it. Why getRow works but getNumber doesn't? They are very similar.

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Check indentation. Also please post the exact same source code. Pastebin would be good. –  Guido Dec 5 '13 at 16:46
    
Why is everything in a do block? Do is only for Monads and unless I am missing something a tuple is not one. You're missing IO everywhere. –  DiegoNolan Dec 5 '13 at 16:48
3  
A good Haskell book is not a bad idea since you seem to have a fair number of concepts mixed up, try Learn You A Haskell for Great Good –  jozefg Dec 5 '13 at 17:13
    
Emacs doesn't allow me another indentation. And I would be happy without Monads, but when I use getLine Emacs makes me use use them. If I try to return Monads I have no idea how to give then to another function, and I can't get Ints from IO Ints –  Agnes Dec 5 '13 at 17:33
2  
@Agnes Haskell has quite a learning curve, it takes a while to become truly comfortable with its style of programming and it isn't for everyone (just as I dislike Java, but it's obviously a widely used language). Don't dismiss the language because it's difficult to understand at first, there are a lot of benefits that come later. I've even been able to apply lessons learned in Haskell to my Python and .NET code. It is definitely a language that forced me to learn something new about programming rather than being like all the main stream languages. –  bheklilr Dec 5 '13 at 17:49

1 Answer 1

There are a number of pervasive errors in this code. Most particularly, pure computations were being done in the last line of a do block---these must be returned so that they end up "in IO". None of your types were returning in the IO monad. There was also probably an indentation error in your last if statement in getNumber.

getInt :: IO Int          -- in the IO monad
getInt = do  
  s <- getLine
  return (read s)         -- we must return pure values from monads

getRow :: [Int] -> IO (Int,Int)       -- in the IO monad
getRow board = do
  putStrLn "Give me row number "
  row <- getInt
  if ((length board) > (row-1)) && ((board!!(row-1)) > 0 )
    then return (row, board!!(row-1))   -- we must return pure values from monads
    else do putStrLn "niepoprawny rzad"
            getRow board

getNumber :: [Int] -> (Int, Int) -> IO (Int, Int)   -- in the IO monad
getNumber board row = do
  putStrLn "Give me number of stones you want to take"
  number <- getInt
  if number < 1 
    then do putStrLn "wrong number"
            getNumber board row
    else if (number > (snd row))                           -- better indentation
           then return ((fst row), 0)                      -- we must return
           else return ((fst row), ((snd row) - number))   -- we must return
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