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I came across a question "How can one reverse a number as an integer and not as a string?" Could anyone please help me to find out the answer.

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Define "reverse a number as an integer" –  Stephen C Jan 11 '10 at 8:50
    
Can you be more precise? –  piggles Jan 11 '10 at 8:50
1  
If you mean reverse the digits, then you are basically reversing a string - convert to string, reverse, convert back... –  David M Jan 11 '10 at 8:53
2  
This looks SO like a school homework. I used to do these kind of things when I was in college... –  Paulo Santos Jan 11 '10 at 8:55
3  
I think it looks more like Project Euler. Problem number 4, to be exact :p –  Svish Jan 11 '10 at 10:01
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10 Answers 10

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This should do it:

int n = 12345;
int left = n;
int rev = 0;
while(left>0)
{
   r = left % 10;   
   rev = rev * 10 + r;
   left = left / 10;  //left = Math.floor(left / 10); 
}

Console.WriteLine(rev);
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Thanks so much , but I think this will not work when given number has 0 at end. just like 40 –  Pritam Karmakar Jan 11 '10 at 13:45
2  
it will still work on numbers with 0 –  jerjer Jan 12 '10 at 2:04
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Something like this?

public int ReverseInt(int num)
{
    int result=0;
    while (num>0) 
    {
       result = result*10 + num%10;
       num /= 10;
    }
    return result;
}

As a hackish one-liner (update: used Benjamin's comment to shorten it):

num.ToString().Reverse().Aggregate(0, (b, x) => 10 * b + x - '0');

A speedier one-and-a-quarter-liner:

public static int ReverseOneLiner(int num)
{
    for (int result=0;; result = result * 10 + num % 10, num /= 10) if(num==0) return result;
    return 42;
}

It's not a one-liner because I had to include return 42;. The C# compiler wouldn't let me compile because it thought that no code path returned a value.

P.S. If you write code like this and a co-worker catches it, you deserve everything he/she does to you. Be warned!

EDIT: I wondered about how much slower the LINQ one-liner is, so I used the following benchmark code:

public static void Bench(Func<int,int> myFunc, int repeat)
{
    var R = new System.Random();
    var sw = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int i = 0; i < repeat; i++)
    {
        var ignore = myFunc(R.Next());
    }
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Operation took {0}ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

Result (10^6 random numbers in positive int32 range):

While loop version:
Operation took 279ms

Linq aggregate:
Operation took 984ms
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Although the one-liner is very inefficient. –  KennyTM Jan 11 '10 at 9:11
    
Of course, that's why I called it hackish. It's more of a curiosity. –  cfern Jan 11 '10 at 9:12
1  
ToCharArray() is redundant and you could do the char to int conversion from your select in the aggregate as well - saves horizontal space. :) See my sample below for the string-only version. –  Benjamin Podszun Jan 11 '10 at 9:13
1  
@cfern you missed a little check if the number is negative... My teacher back in college would have a field day with this... :-P –  Paulo Santos Jan 11 '10 at 9:13
    
Oops. That's what happen if you code something within 60 seconds. I wonder how to define the reverse of a negative number. Rev (-1234) = -4321? –  cfern Jan 11 '10 at 9:22
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Yay! A bling way. (No, really. I hope that this is more a "How would I do..." question and not something you really need in production)

public int Reverse(int number) {
  return int.Parse(number.ToString().Reverse().Aggregate("", (s,c) => s+c));
}
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very nice solution! –  Flynn Dec 28 '12 at 16:42
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multiply it by -1? precise your question please...

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Actually as I mentioned in the question line...I came across this question in a website, where they have published multiple interview question. So I am also confused with the question line. –  Pritam Karmakar Jan 11 '10 at 10:49
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using System; 

public class DoWhileDemo {   
  public static void Main() { 
    int num; 
    int nextdigit; 

    num = 198; 

    Console.WriteLine("Number: " + num); 

    Console.Write("Number in reverse order: "); 

    do { 
      nextdigit = num % 10; 
      Console.Write(nextdigit); 
      num = num / 10; 
    } while(num > 0); 

    Console.WriteLine(); 
  }   
}
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Check below simple and easy -

public int reverseNumber(int Number)
{
  int ReverseNumber = 0;
  while(Number > 0)
  {
    ReverseNumber = (ReverseNumber * 10) + (Number % 10);
    Number = Number / 10;
  }
  return ReverseNumber;
}

Reference : Reverse number program in c#

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You can't. Since the computer thinks in hexadecimal in any case, it is necessary for you to tokenise the number into Arabic format, which is semantically identical to the conversion to string.

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@Alex: to be more precise computer works with bits and hexadecimal is an exact multiple (ie: groups of 4 bits for each hexadecimal digit). But it still can do maths however as showed above. –  kriss Apr 12 '10 at 14:30
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    /// <summary>
    /// Reverse a int using its sting representation.
    /// </summary>
    private int ReverseNumber(int value)
    {
        string textValue = value.ToString().TrimStart('-');

        char[] valueChars = textValue.ToCharArray();
        Array.Reverse(valueChars);
        string reversedValue = new string(valueChars);
        int reversedInt = int.Parse(reversedValue);

        if (value < 0)
           reversedInt *= -1;

        return reversedInt;
    }
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Old thread, but I did not see this variation:

        int rev(int n) {
            string str = new String(n.ToString().Reverse().ToArray());
            return int.Parse(str);
        }
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I looked at the following solution. But how about when n is negative?

Lets say n = -123456

Here is a tweak I added to it to handle negative numbers, with that assumption it will threat negative numbs the same way.

        int reverse = 0;
        bool isNegative = false;

        if (n < 0)
            isNegative = true;

        n = Math.Abs(n);
        while (n > 0)
        {
            int rem = n % 10;
            reverse = (reverse * 10) + rem;
            n = n / 10;
        }

        if (isNegative)
            reverse = reverse * (-1);

        return reverse;
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