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I have been making a rock paper scissors game, and it works like a dream. However, when I try to add some validation in (shown with the #'s) my game doesn't work. I'm not sure why this is the case.

My code is following:

    from random import randint
    from sys import exit
    computer = randint(1,3)

    r = "r"
    p = "p"
    s = "s"
    print ("The computer has chosen. Your turn")
    player = input ("r is Rock, p is Paper, and s is Scissors. Put your letter in HERE-----> ")

    #from here

    if (player != r or p or s): 
            player = input ("That wasn't r, p, or s. Please try again. r is Rock, p is Paper, and s is Scissors. Put your letter in HERE-----> ")
            if (player != r or p or s) :
                    print ("Can you srsly not understand that " + player + " is not r, p, or s? I give up")
                    exit()


    #to here



    if (computer == 1):
            AI = ("rock")

    if (computer == 2):
            AI = ("paper")

    if (computer == 3):
            AI = ("scissors")

    if (player == r and computer == 1):
            print ("lol draw")
            exit()

    if (player == p and computer == 2):
            print ("lol draw")
            exit()

    if (player == s and computer == 3):
            print ("lol draw")
            exit()

    if (player == r and computer == 3):
            print ("You WIN!!!!!! AI chose " + AI)

    if (player == p and computer == 1):
            print ("You WIN!!!!!! AI chose " + AI)

    if (player == s and computer == 2):
            print ("You WIN!!!!!! AI chose " + AI)

    if (player == s and computer == 1):
            print ("You LOSE!!!!!! AI chose " + AI)

    if (player == r and computer == 2):
            print ("You LOSE!!!!!! AI chose " + AI)

    if (player == p and computer == 3):
            print ("You LOSE!!!!!! AI chose " + AI)
share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by "it doesn't work"? –  Mihai Maruseac Dec 5 '13 at 19:35
    
WOAH fast reply. –  carpetguy Dec 5 '13 at 19:39
    
Now code 'rock, paper, scissors, lizard, Spock.' –  thumbtackthief Dec 5 '13 at 19:41
    
WELL... it looks like my qu has been answered. TY –  carpetguy Dec 5 '13 at 19:43
1  
Remember to put a checkmark next to the correct question. –  Gustav Bertram Dec 5 '13 at 19:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The or operator again.

player != r or p or s

Should be

player not in (r, p, s)

or similar.

Explanation:

A or B evaluates to A, if A is considered true (truey). If A is considered falsy (e.g. False, 0, 0.0, [], ''), A or B evaluates to B.

player != r or p or s is the same as (player != r) or p or s. Now (player != r) or p or s evaluates to True if player != r and to p otherwise. As both True and p are "truey", these two lines are equivalent:

if player != r or p or s:
if True:
share|improve this answer
    
TY worked....... –  carpetguy Dec 5 '13 at 19:44
    
Glad to help, and please read my explanation and try to digest it. And read the documentation of python's logical operator. –  Hyperboreus Dec 5 '13 at 19:45
    
don't get it but reading now and trying to –  carpetguy Dec 5 '13 at 19:47
    
OK, get it now.... god I hate the minimum character comment –  carpetguy Dec 5 '13 at 19:51

Here is a shorter version of your code using a few more advanced python idioms:

from random import randint
from sys import exit
computer = randint(0,2)
choices = 'rps'

print ("The computer has chosen. Your turn")
player = raw_input("r is Rock, p is Paper, and s is Scissors. Put your letter in HERE-----> ")

if (player not in choices): 
    player = raw_input("That wasn't r, p, or s. Please try again. r is Rock, p is Paper, and s is Scissors. Put your letter in HERE-----> ")
    if (player not in choices):
        print ("Can you srsly not understand that '%s' is not r, p, or s? I give up" % player)
        exit()

if (player == choices[computer]):
        print ("lol draw, AI also chose %s" % choices[computer])
        exit()

flip = choices.index(player) > computer
result = ("WIN", "LOSE")[(flip + choices.index(player) - computer) % 2] 
print ("You %s!!!!!! AI chose %s" % (result, choices[computer]))
share|improve this answer

change this

if (player != r or p or s):

to this

if player != r and player != p and player != s:
share|improve this answer
    
To explain why, since I'm guessing you're newish: What you have is equivalent to (not real Python code): –  thumbtackthief Dec 5 '13 at 19:36
    
this answer is incorrect x != True or x != False will always yield True...should be and not or –  jpwagner Dec 5 '13 at 19:39
    
didn't work, but I got an answer above –  carpetguy Dec 5 '13 at 19:45

What you have is equivalent to (not real Python code): if player != r or if p or if s which is not what you want: since p and s are already defined as true your if statement will trigger every time.

You want if player != r and player != p and player != s (i.e., none of the three things are true)

if player not in [r, p, s] would also work equivalently if you prefer--I think it's a little more Pythonic.

share|improve this answer
    
Not according to my repl. player = 'r' p = 'p' s = 's' if (player != r or p or s): print 'yes' if (player != r): print 'no' gives yes. –  thumbtackthief Dec 5 '13 at 19:46
1  
My bad. Apologies. –  Hyperboreus Dec 5 '13 at 19:47
    
lol above....... –  carpetguy Dec 5 '13 at 19:50
1  
OK, player != r or p or s is True iff player != r, and otherwise it is p. So basically it is always True. –  Hyperboreus Dec 5 '13 at 19:52
    
No worries--I actually had a totally different error in my code anyway, which I've fixed. Mind removing your downvote? They make me sad. –  thumbtackthief Dec 5 '13 at 19:53

This isn't an answer to the syntax issue, however I feel that in following a similar structure as presented, the '“Rock, Paper, Scissors” validation' can be greatly cleaned up.

# read player input and return "r", "p" or "s"
def getPlayerChoice():
    # return value read from input, as per your code, with the fixes.

# read computer choice and return "r", "p" or "s"
def getComputerChoice():
    # return "r", "p", or "s" based on the random number

# get the "English" name of a value
def getName(rps):
    # given "r", "p", or "s", return the name like "rock", etc.

# now these two variables will have the value "r", "p" or "s"
# no numbers, no "rock", just some consistent values
player = getPlayerChoice()
computer = getComputerChoice()

# By using consistent values we are able to make the tie check very easy
# and make the win checks easy to read.

# chose same value - "r", "p" or "s"
if player == computer:
    print("Tie")

# all ways player could have won
elif (   (player == "r" and computer == "s")
      or (player == "p" and computer == "r")
      or (player == "s" and computer == "p")):
    print("You win! " + getName(player) + " beats " + getName(computer))

# otherwise the computer won
else:
    print("You lose! " + getName(computer) + " beats " + getName(player))

YMMV, and any bugs in the above structure are "freebies".

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, but I have to downvote because this isn't valid python. –  SethMMorton Dec 6 '13 at 0:45
    
@SethMMorton That's fine, it definitely is not. I did fix the grievous misuses of &&/||/; and the conditional expression. Silly rushed me. –  user2864740 Dec 6 '13 at 0:47

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