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I am quite new (just started this week) to Node.js and there is a fundamental piece that I am having trouble understanding. I have a helper function which makes a MySQL database call to get a bit of information. I then use a callback function to get that data back to the caller which works fine but when I want to use that data outside of that callback I run into trouble. Here is the code:

    /** Helper Function **/
    function getCompanyId(token, callback) {
            var query = db.query('SELECT * FROM companies WHERE token = ?', token, function(err, result) {
                var count = Object.keys(result).length;

                if(count == 0) {
                    return;
                } else {
                    callback(null, result[0].api_id);
                }
            });
        }

/*** Function which uses the data from the helper function ***/
    api.post('/alert', function(request, response) {
        var data = JSON.parse(request.body.data);
        var token = data.token;

        getCompanyId(token, function(err, result) {
            // this works
            console.log(result);
        });

        // the problem is that I need result here so that I can use it else where in this function.
    });

As you can see I have access to the return value from getCompanyId() so long as I stay within the scope of the callback but I need to use that value outside of the callback. I was able to get around this in another function by just sticking all the logic inside of that callback but that will not work in this case. Any insight on how to better structure this would be most appreciated. I am really enjoying Node.js thus far but obviously I have a lot of learning to do.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Short answer - you can't do that without violating the asynchronous nature of Node.js.

Think about the consequences of trying to access result outside of your callback - if you need to use that value, and the callback hasn't run yet, what will you do? You can't sleep and wait for the value to be set - that is incompatible with Node's single threaded, event-driven design. Your entire program would have to stop executing whilst waiting for the callback to run.

Any code that depends on result should be inside the getCompanyId callback:

api.post('/alert', function(request, response) {
    var data = JSON.parse(request.body.data);
    var token = data.token;

    getCompanyId(token, function(err, result) {
        //Any logic that depends on result has to be nested in here
    });
});

One of the hardest parts about learning Node.js (and async programming is general) is learning to think asynchronously. It can be difficult at first but it is worth persisting. You can try to fight and code procedurally, but it will inevitably result in unmaintainable, convoluted code.

If you don't like the idea of multiple nested callbacks, you can look into promises, which let you chain methods together instead of nesting them. This article is a good introduction to Q, one implementation of promises.

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I can definitely do that, it just "feels" so wrong, at least different than what I am used to. Thanks for the quick response! –  Nicholas Kreidberg Dec 5 '13 at 20:40
1  
It may feel wrong, but that's your inner procedural programmer speaking. Adjusting to async can take some time, often because it "feels" wrong. –  joews Dec 5 '13 at 20:45
    
+1. See my answer for some elaboration that might be helpful. –  user949300 Dec 5 '13 at 21:04

If you are concerned about having everything crammed inside the callback function, you can always name the function, move it out, and then pass the function as the callback:

getCompanyId(token, doSomethingAfter); // Pass the function in

function doSomethingAfter(err, result) {
    // Code here
}
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Okay, so with this approach how would I get the value stored in 'result' back to the calling function? In api.post('/alert' ....) would I do: var result = getCompanyId; and in doSomethingAfter() would I just return result? –  Nicholas Kreidberg Dec 5 '13 at 20:44
    
You wouldn't, you would have to do whatever you need inside of the doSomethingAfter function. It's basically just a way to prevent tons of nested functions. You won't be able do var result = getCompany.... –  making3 Dec 5 '13 at 20:48

My "aha" moment came when I began thinking of these as "fire and forget" methods. Don't look for return values coming back from the methods, because they don't come back. The calling code should move on, or just end. Yes, it feels weird.

As @joews says, you have to put everything depending on that value inside the callback(s).

This often requires you passing down an extra parameter(s). For example, if you are doing a typical HTTP request/response, plan on sending the response down every step along the callback chain. The final callback will (hopefully) set data in the response, or set an error code, and then send it back to the user.

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If you want to avoid callback smells you need to use Node's Event Emitter Class like so:

at top of file require event module -

var emitter = require('events').EventEmitter();

then in your callback:

api.post('/alert', function(request, response) {
    var data = JSON.parse(request.body.data);
    var token = data.token;

    getCompanyId(token, function(err, result) {
        // this works
        console.log(result);
        emitter.emit('company:id:returned', result);
    });

    // the problem is that I need result here so that I can use it else where in this function.
});

then after your function you can use the on method anywhere like so:

getCompanyId(token, function(err, result) {
        // this works
        console.log(result);
        emitter.emit('company:id:returned', result);
    });

    // the problem is that I need result here so that I can use it else where in this function.
    emitter.on('company:id:returned', function(results) {
       // do what you need with results
    });

just be careful to set up good namespacing conventions for your events so you don't get a mess of on events and also you should watch the number of listeners you attach, here is a good link for reference:

http://www.sitepoint.com/nodejs-events-and-eventemitter/

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Have you tried either github.com/kriskowal/q or github.com/medikoo/deferred? It looks like they do roughly the same thing. –  Nicholas Kreidberg Dec 5 '13 at 21:19
1  
i have looked at q and the difference between mine and theirs is they are using promises and i am using pub/sub, it just depends on what you prefer to do, most cases i use promises but sometimes they can get a bit lengthy and they are a bit harder to maintain in my opinion, however i am sure a lot of people will disagree –  kkemple Dec 5 '13 at 22:08

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