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How to update a column of a table using an aggregate function in the sql update statement ?

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This is too vague, but it sounds a bit suspicious, in a denormalisation kind of a way. Please give some details of what you are trying to achieve, so that we can better answer your question. –  APC Jan 11 '10 at 11:24
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1 Answer 1

Aggregate function, by definition, aggregates one or more records of the input into a single record in a resultset, so it is not obvious which one you want to update.

In general, you can use aggregate functions in a subquery:

UPDATE  mytable
SET     mycol = 
        (
        SELECT  SUM(othercol)
        FROM    othertable o
        WHERE   o.yetothercol = m.yetmycol
        )

, in a JOIN (works in MySQL and SQL Server)

UPDATE  mytable
JOIN    (
        SELECT  yetothercol, SUM(othercol) AS psum
        FROM    othertable
        GROUP BY
                yetothercol
        ) s
ON      yetmycol = yetothercol
SET     mycol = psum

, or in a MERGE statement (works in Oracle and SQL Server 2008):

MERGE
INTO    mycol
USING   (
        SELECT  yetothercol, SUM(othercol) AS psum
        FROM    othertable
        GROUP BY
                yetothercol
        ) s
ON      (yetmycol = yetothercol)
WHEN MATCHED THEN
UPDATE
SET     mycol = psum
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I have a question regarding the first suggestion. How to be sure that the order of the sub query is ok to asign values to myco ? You are specifying m.yetmycol in the where clause (I guess you mean mytable as m). How do you know if it's going to come out in the order of o.yetothercol or m.yetmycol ? Is it predictable ? (I felt like it shouldn't be another question, but maybe it would be easier to ask.) –  Etiennebr Dec 16 '10 at 16:42
    
@Etiennebr: what do you mean by "the order of the subquery"? –  Quassnoi Dec 16 '10 at 22:21
    
Well, I'm not sure about terminology here, but the query containing the join looks like a subquery (There's a SELECT query in an UPDATE query). And I think I've answered my question myself. The order is guaranteed by the o.yetothercol = m.yetmycol and the fact that m is outside the first query. –  Etiennebr Jan 17 '11 at 14:17
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