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I have the following.

  1. A Java process writing logs to the stdout
  2. A shell script starting the Java process
  3. Another shell script which executes the previous one and redirects the log
  4. I check the log file with the tail -f command for the success message.

Even if I have exit 0 in the code I cannot end the tail -f process.

Which doesn't let my script to finish. Is there any other way of doing this in Bash?

The code looks like the following.

function startServer() {
  touch logfile
  startJavaprocess > logfile &

  tail -f logfile | while read line 
  do
    if echo $line | grep -q 'Started'; then
      echo 'Server Started'
      exit 0
    fi
  done
}
share|improve this question
    
not really a good answer, but the tail will die on a broken pipe at the first output after your script has ended. –  falstro Jan 11 '10 at 11:24
    
The problem is what happens if the java process doesn't write anything after starting, it seems that the tail is waiting for ever. –  rangalo Jan 11 '10 at 11:26
    
Does it ever echo 'Server Started'? –  Alex Brown Jan 11 '10 at 11:27
    
be careful too though, start your tail before you start the server (with a -n0 as not to read any old entries). Otherwise it might already be out of the 'scrollback' tail gives you (default is five lines I believe) –  falstro Jan 11 '10 at 11:28
    
@Alex Brown, yes ! It echos 'Server Started'. And the loop is also finished. I verified it. –  rangalo Jan 11 '10 at 11:29

14 Answers 14

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The best answer I can come up with is this

  1. Put a timeout on the read, tail -f logfile | read -t 30 line
  2. Start tail with --pid=$$, that way it'll exit when the bash-process has finished.

It'll cover all cases I can think of (server hangs with no output, server exits, server starts correctly).

Dont forget to start your tail before the server.

tail -n0 -F logfile 2>/dev/null | while read -t 30 line

the -F will 'read' the file even if it doesn't exist (start reading it when it appears). The -n0 won't read anything already in the file, so you can keep appending to the logfile instead of overwriting it each time, and to standard log rotation on it.

EDIT:
Ok, so a rather crude 'solution', if you're using tail. There are probably better solutions using something else but tail, but I got to give it to you, tail gets you out of the broken-pipe quite nicely. A 'tee' which is able to handle SIGPIPE would probably work better. The java process actively doing a file system drop with an 'im alive' message of some sort is probably even easier to wait for.

function startServer() {
  touch logfile

  # 30 second timeout.
  sleep 30 &
  timerPid=$!

  tail -n0 -F --pid=$timerPid logfile | while read line 
  do
    if echo $line | grep -q 'Started'; then
      echo 'Server Started'
      # stop the timer..
      kill $timerPid
    fi
  done &

  startJavaprocess > logfile &

  # wait for the timer to expire (or be killed)
  wait %sleep
}
share|improve this answer
1  
what is 30 ? seconds ? –  rangalo Jan 11 '10 at 11:54
    
it didn't work, the $$ was bash -hB process which is always running –  rangalo Jan 11 '10 at 12:16
    
I see, I figured you were running a script to start your server, not that you had one doing both start and stop. But anyway, that should be solvable... I'll give it some thought and get back to you –  falstro Jan 11 '10 at 12:45
    
I am currently not on the system, but soon give it a try and let you know. –  rangalo Jan 12 '10 at 10:47
    
Thanks. This works, but only if I start the script before the tail and loop. Otherwise i only get the timeout no grep. The other disadvantage is that I get output from bash for kill and if wait because the sleep has already died. –  rangalo Jan 13 '10 at 9:59

According to the tail man page, you can get tail to terminate after the a process dies

In BASH, you can get the PID of the last started background process using $! SO if you're using bash:

tail -f --pid=$! logfile
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is the script is waiting. I do the same trick for the shutdown script and it works because the shutdown script finishes. But the startup script hangs on. –  rangalo Jan 11 '10 at 11:41
    
This will not stop the tail until the server stops, which might be years from now. Use $$ instead, it'll trigger when the script exits. –  falstro Jan 11 '10 at 11:42
    
@roe, can you please elaborate a bit ? My problem is that neither server nor the script is terminating –  rangalo Jan 11 '10 at 11:45

Capture the pid of the background process

pid=$!

Use tail's --pid=PID option, so that it terminates after the process having pid $PID terminates.

share|improve this answer

How about using an infinite loop instead of the -f command-line option for tail?

function startServer() {
  startJavaprocess > logfile &

  while [ 1 ]
  do
   if tail logfile | grep -q 'Started'; then
    echo 'Server started'
    exit 0
   fi
  done
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not bad but there's a risk you could miss the 'Started' line if, for example, it's written in between loops followed by enough lines to stop it showing up in the next tail. –  paxdiablo Jan 11 '10 at 12:11
    
If you want to eliminate the risk entirely you could grep in the entire file. –  Flimm Jan 11 '10 at 15:16

Based on the answers I found here, this is what I've come up with.

It directly deals with tail and kills it once we've seen the needed log output. Using 'pkill -P $$ tail' should ensure that the right process is killed.

wait_until_started() {
    echo Waiting until server is started
    regex='Started'
    tail logfile -n0 -F | while read line; do
            if [[ $line =~ $regex ]]; then
                    pkill -9 -P $$ tail
            fi
    done
    echo Server is started
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a gem! Really looked all over the internet for this. I believe this should be the accepted answer :) –  Ardee Aram Dec 4 at 10:46
    
Update: Actually, though this works ok in the command line, somehow it doesn't work as good when run over SSH. What I did is replaced pkill -9 -P -$$ tail with killall tail. A little crude, but does the job. –  Ardee Aram Dec 6 at 1:47

Rather than exiting the process, you can instead find the process ID of the tail -f process and kill it (a kill -9 would even be safe here if you're sure the log file has finished).

That way, the while read line will terminate naturally and you won't need to exit.

Or, since you're not really using the tail to output to the screen, you could also try the more old-school:

grep -q 'Started' logfile
while [[ $? -ne 0 ]] ; do
    sleep 1
    grep -q 'Started' logfile
done
share|improve this answer
    
There might be 'Started' from earlier sessions in there, so I wouldn't bet on your old-school version –  falstro Jan 11 '10 at 11:43
    
No, there won't be because the java process is overwriting the logfile, not appending to it. –  paxdiablo Jan 11 '10 at 11:51
    
right, I guess I'm not paying attention.. cleaner would be while ! grep -q 'Started' logfile; do sleep 1; done –  falstro Jan 11 '10 at 18:23

I had the same problem, couldn't find simple and good solution. I'm not good in Python, but I managed somehow to solve this:

wait_log.py:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from optparse import OptionParser
import os
import subprocess
import time

def follow(file):
    def file_size(file):
        return os.fstat(file.fileno())[6]
    def is_newLine(line):
        return line != None and line.find("\n") != -1;

    file.seek(0, os.SEEK_END)

    while True:
        if file.tell() > file_size(file):
            file.seek(0, os.SEEK_END)

        line_start = file.tell()
        line = file.readline()

        if is_newLine(line):
            yield line
        else:
            time.sleep(0.5)
            file.seek(line_start)

def wait(file_path, message):
    with open(file_path) as file:
        for line in follow(file):
            if line.find(message) != -1:
                break

def main():
    parser = OptionParser(description="Wait for a specific message in log file.", usage="%prog [options] message")
    parser.add_option("-f", "--file", help="log file")

    (options, args) = parser.parse_args()

    if len(args) != 1:
        parser.error("message not provided")

    if options.file == None:
        parser.error("file not provided")

    wait(options.file, args[0])

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
share|improve this answer

Had a similar issue where the tail process wasnt getting killed when

  1. Run through jsch
  2. tail wasnt producing any output to jsch and hence to its output stream.

Used the --pid=$! to kill it and started a infinite while loop to echo something in the background before the tail which gets killed when the underlying process is killed and thus kills the tail.

( while true; do echo 'running';  sleep 5; done ) & ( tail -f --pid=$! log-file )
share|improve this answer

I have had a similar situation where I need to tail a log for a "started" message within a reasonable time and if it is not found during that time I need to exit. Here is what I ended up doing.

wait_tomcat_start(){
WAIT=60
echo "Waiting for Tomcat to initialize for $WAIT seconds"

# Tail log file, do a while read loop with a timeout that checks for desired log status,
# if found kill the find and break the loop. If not found within timeout: the read -t will
# kill the while read loop and bounce to the OR statement that will in turn kill the tail 
# and echo some message to the console.
tail -n0 -f $SERVERLOG | while read -t $WAIT LINE || (pkill -f "tail -n0 -f" && echo "Tomcat did not start in a timely fashion! Please check status of tomcat!!!")
do
        echo "$LINE"
        [[ "${LINE}" == *"Server startup in"* ]] && pkill -f "tail -n0 -f" && break
done
}

I’m not sure this is very elegant or even the best way to do it, but it works good enough for me. I'd be happy for any opinions :)

share|improve this answer

This should work and tail should die once the sub shell dies


function startServer() {
  touch logfile
  startJavaprocess > logfile &

  while read line 
  do
    if echo $line | grep -q 'Started'; then
      echo 'Server Started'
      exit 0
    fi
  done < <(tail -f logfile)
}

Try this:

function startServer() {
  while read line 
  do
    if echo $line | grep -q 'Started'; then
      echo 'Server Started'
      return 0
    fi
  done < <(startJavaprocess | tee logfile)
}
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't work. The tail is still alive –  rangalo Jan 13 '10 at 9:57
    
your right, that is odd... what about this... see edits –  rcarson Jan 13 '10 at 20:59

Don't use tail - you can get the same 'monitor the newest thing in the file' using read.

Here I use a FIFO instead of the log file:

function startServer() {
  mkfifo logfile
  startJavaprocess > logfile &

  a=""; while [ "$a" != "Started" ]; do read <logfile a; done

  echo "Server Started"
}

Note that this leaves a FIFO hanging around.

share|improve this answer
    
This will kill the java process (broken pipe) when the fifo is removed, or in the second example when the loop exits. Probably not what you intended. –  falstro Jan 11 '10 at 17:21
    
true, I had spotted the terminate in the second instance, but not the first. simple fix for the first, I'll remove the second until I think of a way around that. –  Alex Brown Jan 11 '10 at 17:29

Using tail -n0 -f piped to grep is indeed a nice solution, and indeed the first process in the pipe will die when it tries to output to a dead grep process.

But if you're hunting for text that appears near to the last current output of the tail, then grep will already have read the whole input from the tail (in one block) and therefore there won't be any more text output in the log that needs sending down the pipe as grep already read it before it quit (or maybe it was already in the pipe buffer) - at least this is my understanding.

Using "-m1" option on grep looks like it'd do exactly what you want and leave the input immediately after the line it matched, but it didn't seem to make a difference or help me in my search for similar functionality. I suspect the pipe buffer still holds all the text output from tail, or some other reason for tail not to have anything left to output. You wanted this post-grep-match text still left to be output next, because its what would kill your tail when it tried (still risky - what happens if its the last line for some reason?), and return control to the calling script.

I found one way round it is to output anything into the end of the log file once the grep has quit; ie.

tail -f logfile | ( grep -q ; echo >> logfile)

I have a theory that (if my guess is right) you could force the pipe to be less buffered to make it work without this, or maybe that adding a huponexit setting command to the appropriate pipe component - ie in (probably curly) brackets would help; but I didn't care about appending a blank line to the logfile and it worked ok and its only a smaller test script (so not a long lived logfile that needs to stick to a format for other processing).

shopt -s huponexit would be useful but for the subshell-ness of it.

PS my first post here, woulda liked to do it as a comment to existing answer rather than re-iterate stuff, but I don't think I can now.

share|improve this answer
    
PS this doesn't rely on too much bash-specific-ness - "<(file)" is not available in older ksh/other shell versions. –  Breezer Jun 27 '11 at 20:34

For the original question, why the exit command didn't quit, I got the same issue and finally found the cause.

By using the debug mode of bash, I can see the exit command was called but the process still hung until one more line flush to the log file just after the 'Started'. The wierd thing is when 'Started' came out, even exit had been called, the process is still hooked by something. I guess it was tail -f, until one more line come out, it will really release the hook.

So if you print one more line after it's started, your monitor will quit straight away.

share|improve this answer

My preferred solution for this problem is to put the 'tail' command and its consumer into a subshell, and let the filter logic kill the parent and its children (which includes the tail process). If you look at the process tree, it will be:

startServer (pid=101)
   startServer (pid=102) << This is the subshell created by using parens "(...)"
      tail -f logfile (pid=103) << Here's the tail process
      startServer (pid=104)     << Here's the logic that detects the end-marker

In this approach, the end-marker detection logic (pid 104) looks for its parent PID (102), and all of its children, and kills the whole batch -- including itself. Then the grandparent (pid 101 above) is free to continue.

function startServer() {
  touch logfile
  startJavaprocess > logfile &

  tail -f logfile | while read line 
  do
    if echo $line | grep -q 'Started'; then
      echo 'Server Started'
      mypid=$BASHPID
      pipeParent=$(awk '/^PPid/ {print $2}' /proc/$mypid/status)
      kill -TERM $pipeParent $(pgrep -P $pipeParent)  # Kill the subshell and kids
    fi
  done
}

# To invoke startServer(), add a set of parens -- that puts it in a subshell:
(startServer())
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