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I have a method in a base class that I want to keep in a subclass, but just add to it. I've found lots of stuff on augmenting classes and objects with properties and methods, but I can't find, or don't understand, how to just augment the method. The worst case scenario is that I would have to paste the entire method of the parent class into the subclass, but that seems like duplicate code... please help

function someObject (){
    this.someProperty = 1;
    this.incrementProperty = function incrementProperty(){   
        this.propertyOfSomeObject += 1;
    }
}

function newObject (){
    someObject.call(this);
    this.incrementProperty =  function incrementProperty(){
        //do everything the super class has for this property already
        return this.someProperty;
    }
}

var incrementer = new newObject;
alert (incrementer.incrementProperty()); //I want output to be 2
share|improve this question
2  
Your someObject.call(this) is useless because you're overwriting the incrementProperty method that was assigned in the someObject() call with a different one on the next line. So there is no such "super" function to call. It has been deleted. – Blue Skies Dec 6 '13 at 2:06
    
so if I were to write var inc2 = new someObject; alert (inc2.incrementProperty()); it would not run this.propertyOfSomeObject += 1; ? – jgrant Dec 6 '13 at 2:18
    
Sure it would, but that's because you're getting the object from someObject() directly. That's not what your question is doing. In your question, you're getting newObject() then applying the someObject() function to the same object. So first the object gets the incrementProperty from someObject(), but then that one gets overwritten with the one from newObject() – Blue Skies Dec 6 '13 at 2:25
1  
Oh, ok. No this will be entirely different from JavaScript. They use a constructor function because they wanted it to be Java-like when they invented it, but the underlying concept is totally different. Basically prototypal inheritance is a lookup chain of objects, and a constructor function sets up the relationship between two objects. So your this object is actually inheriting from the object located at newObject.prototype. So any method you add to newObject.prototype will be accessible from the object you created. I'd suggest looking at a tutorial or two. – Blue Skies Dec 6 '13 at 2:44
1  
I second @BlueSkies. You should probably learn the basics of js prototypes before moving on, or else you'll be quite lost. Especially if you're coming from a Java background. The syntax can be very misleading. – linstantnoodles Dec 6 '13 at 2:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted
// parent object
function someObject () {
    this.someProperty = 1;
}

// add incrementProperty to the prototype so you're not creating a new function
// every time you instantiate the object
someObject.prototype.incrementProperty = function() {   
  this.someProperty += 1;
  return this.someProperty;
}

// child object
function newObject () {
    // we could do useful work here
}

// setup new object as a child class of someObject
newObject.prototype = new someObject();
// this allows us to use "parent" to call someObject's functions
newObject.prototype.parent = someObject.prototype;
// make sure the constructor points to the right place (not someObject)
newObject.constructor = newObject;

newObject.prototype.incrementProperty = function() {
    // do everything the super class has for this property already
    this.parent.incrementProperty.call(this);
    return this.someProperty;
}

var incrementer = new newObject();
alert (incrementer.incrementProperty()); // I want output to be 2

See: http://jsfiddle.net/J7RhA/

share|improve this answer
    
This is the answer. Thank you SO much! I especially liked the jsfiddle link - very nice addition. I do have a couple follow up questions. 1 - the newObject.prototype.parent definition is a pointer to the someObject class right? So if the someObject class is changed dynamically after newObject inherits from it, the newObject class would not be changed, but references to newObject.prototype.parent would be changed? Also, I deleted the explicit newObject.constructor definition, and poked around, and it looked like it pointing to the right constructor - is that line really necessary? – jgrant Dec 7 '13 at 3:58
    
I ended up running into this problem using this method of inheriting: stackoverflow.com/questions/20463145/… – jgrant Dec 10 '13 at 5:31

this should do, you have to use prototype to have a real concept of oo with javascript

function someObject (){
    this.someProperty = 1;
    this.propertyOfSomeObject = 0;
    this.incrementProperty = function incrementProperty(){   
        this.propertyOfSomeObject += 1;
        return this.propertyOfSomeObject;
    }
}

function newObject (){
    someObject.call(this);
    this.incrementProperty =  function incrementProperty(){
        this.__super__.incrementProperty.apply(this);
        return this.propertyOfSomeObject + 1;
    }
}

newObject.prototype = new someObject()
newObject.prototype.__super__ = newObject.prototype

var incrementer = new newObject();
alert(incrementer.incrementProperty()); //I want output to be 2

experiment removing incrementProperty from newObject and it will return 1

share|improve this answer
2  
That isn't how you assign methods to the prototype. You're just putting a property named prototype directly on the object. I mean it sort of works, but it has nothing to do with prototypal inheritance. You could use foo and it would be the same. – Blue Skies Dec 6 '13 at 2:22
    
do you mean that .prototype behave the same as .foo? – alexgirao Dec 6 '13 at 2:26
    
Correct. The .prototype property with respect to OO in JavaScript is on the function that creates the object. Not on the object itself. So someObject() and newObject() both have a .prototype property that can be assigned methods. Those methods are then inherited by objects created from those functions. – Blue Skies Dec 6 '13 at 2:27
    
I think the right way to do that would be newObject.prototype.incrementProperty = function (){this.someProperty += 1;} ... but even if I did that, in your example, that code is repeated in both classes, so it's not reusing the code, which is what I'm trying to do. – jgrant Dec 6 '13 at 2:38
1  
I don't particularly like this example because it's confusing. First, it stores the function as a property of the object (which make it seem like it's not really shared), and the base object gets set as the prototype (which is also kind of confusing because there's actually nothing on the base classes prototype, hence nothing to "inherit"..). – linstantnoodles Dec 6 '13 at 3:13

I usually use the augment library to write classes in JavaScript. This is how I would rewrite your code using augment:

var Foo = Object.augment(function () {
    this.constructor = function () {
        this.someProperty = 1;
    };

    this.incrementProperty = function () {
        this.someProperty++;
    };
});

var Bar = Foo.augment(function (base) {
    this.constructor = function () {
        base.constructor.call(this);
    };

    this.incrementProperty = function () {
        base.incrementProperty.call(this);
        return this.someProperty;
    };
});

As you can see since Bar extends Foo it gets Foo.prototype as a parameter (which we call base). This allows you to easily call the base class constructor and incrementProperty functions. It also shows that the constructor itself is just another method defined on the prototype.

var bar = new Bar;

alert(bar.incrementProperty());

The output will be 2 as expected. See the demo for yourself: http://jsfiddle.net/47gmQ/

share|improve this answer

From this answer:

Overriding functions

Sometimes children need to extend parent functions.

You want the 'child' (=RussionMini) to do something extra. When RussionMini can call the Hamster code to do something and then do something extra you don't need to copy and paste Hamster code to RussionMini.

In the following example we assume that a Hamster can run 3km an hour but a Russion mini can only run half as fast. We can hard code 3/2 in RussionMini but if this value were to change we have multiple places in code where it needs changing. Here is how we use Hamster.prototype to get the parent (Hamster) speed.

// from goog.inherits in closure library
var inherits = function(childCtor, parentCtor) {
  function tempCtor() {};
  tempCtor.prototype = parentCtor.prototype;
  childCtor.prototype = new tempCtor();
  childCtor.prototype.constructor = childCtor;
};


var Hamster = function(name){
 if(name===undefined){
   throw new Error("Name cannot be undefined");
 }
 this.name=name;
}
Hamster.prototype.getSpeed=function(){
  return 3;
}
Hamster.prototype.run=function(){
  //Russionmini does not need to implement this function as
  //it will do exactly the same as it does for Hamster
  //But Russionmini does need to implement getSpeed as it
  //won't return the same as Hamster (see later in the code) 
  return "I am running at " + 
    this.getSpeed() + "km an hour.";
}

var RussionMini=function(name){
  Hamster.apply(this,arguments);
}
//call this before setting RussionMini prototypes
inherits(RussionMini,Hamster);

RussionMini.prototype.getSpeed=function(){
  return Hamster.prototype
    .getSpeed.call(this)/2;
}    

var betty=new RussionMini("Betty");
console.log(betty.run());//=I am running at 1.5km an hour.
share|improve this answer

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