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i've a class like thsi:

class NotificationManager
{
public:
    static NotificationManager* Instance()
    {
        try
        {
            static std::shared_ptr<NotificationManager> instance( new NotificationManager );
            return instance.get();
        }
        catch( std::bad_alloc& )
        {
            return NULL;
        }
    }

    void foo()
    {
        //do sth
    }
}

if i use this foo function :

NotificationManager::Instance()->foo();

what's the value of use_count?

is it a good approach? if not what's the problem?

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1 Answer 1

instance.use_count() would equal 1.

Why not use the more traditional method of implementing a singleton?

class NotificationManager
{
public:
    static NotificationManager& Instance()
    {
        static NotificationManager instance;
        return instance;
    }

    void foo()
    {
        //do sth
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Either way, this isn't a thread safe singleton unless you are using C++11 standards. (If multiple threads access Instance() at the same time before Instance() has ever been called before then they can receive different storage.) –  James Dec 14 '13 at 7:42

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