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If I send this:

{
  "query" :  "MATCH (p) WHERE p.id={id} CREATE (c {props}) CREATE UNIQUE p-[r:CHILD]->c",
  "params" : {  
      "id" : ["{0000-0000-0000-0000}","{0000-0000-0000-0000}","{0000-0000-0000-0004}"],
      "props" : [ {
          "id" : "{0000-0000-0000-0004}",
          "type": 48,
          "title" : "TestNode" 
       },{
          "id" : "{0000-0000-0000-0005}",
          "type": 49,
          "title" : "TestNode"
       },{
          "id" : "{0000-0000-0000-0006}",
          "type": 49,
          "title" : "TestNode"
       }]
   }
}

Via the restful cypher api, I get back "success" but nothing was created. If I send through this:

{
  "query" :  "MATCH (p) WHERE p.id={id} CREATE (c {props}) CREATE UNIQUE p-[r:CHILD]->c",
  "params" : {  
    "id" : "{0000-0000-0000-0000}",
    "props" : [ {
        "id" : "{0000-0000-0000-0001}",
        "type": 48,
        "title" : "TestNode"
    },{
        "id" : "{0000-0000-0000-0002}",
        "type": 49,
        "title" : "TestNode"
    } ]
  }
}

It creates two children of 0000-0000-0000-0000 as expected. So something about the way I'm specifying two arrays isn't working.

I was hoping to be able to create large tree structures by essentially specifying parent ID/child to create parameters. The other option is that I use the latter style cypher and the transactional endpoint... but I'm just not sure what I'm doing wrong in the first one. Any advice much appreciated.

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You probably need to do:

MATCH (p) WHERE p.id IN {id}
CREATE (c {props}) 
CREATE UNIQUE (p)-[r:CHILD]->(c)

The = operator is an exact comparison.

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I want it to be an exact comparison. It has to find the right parent... –  gremwell Dec 6 '13 at 5:24
    
Right, but you have an array there. Give it one id if you want an exact comparison. The way you have it, it's trying to find a p where p has an id of that array value. –  Wes Freeman Dec 6 '13 at 5:35
    
IN will do an exact comparison for each value of the array, = for the whole array –  jjaderberg Dec 6 '13 at 10:45
    
Ah I see. Thank you for the clarification, I see why it doesn't work. I was hoping it would walk the two arrays side by side so that the first entry in the {id} is substituted in along with the first entry in {props}, then the second entry from both arrays. Using IN would match any of them rather than the specific parent that I need, so I guess it's just not the right way to do it. –  gremwell Dec 7 '13 at 9:39
    
just break it into 3 statements. –  Wes Freeman Dec 8 '13 at 0:44
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