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I have a data frame that has 2 columns.

column1 has random numbers in column2 is a place holding column for what i want column3 to look like

  random    temp
0.502423373 1
0.687594055 0
0.741883739 0
0.445364032 0
0.50626137  0.5
0.516364981 0
...

I want to fill column3 so it takes the last non-zero number (1 or .5 in this example) and continuously fills the following rows with that value until it hits a row with a different number. then it repeats the process for the entire column.

random     temp state
0.502423373 1   1
0.687594055 0   1
0.741883739 0   1
0.445364032 0   1
0.50626137  0.5 0.5
0.516364981 0   0.5
0.807804708 0   0.5
0.247948445 0   0.5
0.46573337  0   0.5
0.103705154 0   0.5
0.079625868 1   1
0.938928944 0   1
0.677713019 0   1
0.112231619 0   1
0.165907178 0   1
0.836195267 0   1
0.387712998 1   1
0.147737077 0   1
0.439281543 0.5 0.5
0.089013503 0   0.5
0.84174743  0   0.5
0.931738707 0   0.5
0.807955172 1   1

thanks for any and all help

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Perhaps you can make use of na.locf from the "zoo" package after setting values of "0" to NA. Assuming your data.frame is called "mydf":

mydf$state <- mydf$temp
mydf$state[mydf$state == 0] <- NA

library(zoo)
mydf$state <- na.locf(mydf$state)
#      random temp state
# 1 0.5024234  1.0   1.0
# 2 0.6875941  0.0   1.0
# 3 0.7418837  0.0   1.0
# 4 0.4453640  0.0   1.0
# 5 0.5062614  0.5   0.5
# 6 0.5163650  0.0   0.5

If there were NA values in your original data.frame in the "temp" column, and you wanted to keep them as NA in the newly generated "state" column too, that's easy to take care of. Just add one more line to reintroduce the NA values:

mydf$state[is.na(mydf$temp)] <- NA
share|improve this answer
    
I think this would be bad if there are already NAs in the data. But if it works that's good too. – Neal Fultz Dec 6 '13 at 7:19
    
@NealFultz, and that comment warrants a down-vote? It's pretty easy to address your concern about the comment. (I'm presuming that you would want the value in the generated "state" variable to be NA if it was NA in the "temp" variable. Notice that I don't touch the "temp" variable, so I still have easy access to that information.) – A Handcart And Mohair Dec 6 '13 at 7:32
    
And if you have NAs next to 0s? – Neal Fultz Dec 6 '13 at 7:58
3  
@NealFultz, ??? How should I know. It's not my data and these conditions are not specified in the question. I would still guess that a NA next to a zero should be replaced with the last known value, and with the current data set, I don't see that this would be a problem. Or do you want to continue filling the data with NA when an NA is encountered? Please feel free to share the condition you perceive and how you propose dealing with it. I don't see that your present solution handles NA values, so I am eager to learn. – A Handcart And Mohair Dec 6 '13 at 8:17
1  
Just to clarify, there are no NAs, so this solution did the trick! – user2813055 Dec 6 '13 at 16:01

Inspired by the solution of @Ananda Mahto, this is an adaption of the internal code of na.locf that works directly with 0's instead of NAs. Then you don't need the zoo package and you don't need to do the preprocessing of changing the values to NA. Benchmarktests show that this is about 10 times faster than the original version.

locf.0 <- function(x) {
  L <- x!=0
  idx <- c(0, which(L))[cumsum(L) + 1]
  return(x[idx])
} 
mydf$state <- locf.0(mydf$temp)
share|improve this answer
    
Clever thought to modify na.locf. +1 – A Handcart And Mohair Dec 7 '13 at 3:40

Here is an interesting way with the Reduce function.

temp = c(1,0,0,0,.5,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0.5,0,0,0,1)
fill_zero = function(x,y) if(y==0) x else y
state = Reduce(fill_zero, temp, accumulate=TRUE)

If you're worried about speed, you can try Rcpp.

library(Rcpp)
cppFunction('
  NumericVector fill_zeros( NumericVector x ) {
    for( int i=1; i<x.size(); i++ )
     if( x[i]==0 ) x[i] = x[i-1];
    return x;
  }
')
state = fill_zeros(temp)
share|improve this answer

Also, unless I'm overlooking something, this seems to work:

DF$state2 <- ave(DF$temp, cumsum(DF$temp), FUN = function(x) x[x != 0])
DF
#       random temp state state2
#1  0.50242337  1.0   1.0    1.0
#2  0.68759406  0.0   1.0    1.0
#3  0.74188374  0.0   1.0    1.0
#4  0.44536403  0.0   1.0    1.0
#5  0.50626137  0.5   0.5    0.5
#6  0.51636498  0.0   0.5    0.5
#7  0.80780471  0.0   0.5    0.5
#8  0.24794844  0.0   0.5    0.5
#9  0.46573337  0.0   0.5    0.5
#10 0.10370515  0.0   0.5    0.5
#11 0.07962587  1.0   1.0    1.0
#12 0.93892894  0.0   1.0    1.0
#13 0.67771302  0.0   1.0    1.0
#14 0.11223162  0.0   1.0    1.0
#15 0.16590718  0.0   1.0    1.0
#16 0.83619527  0.0   1.0    1.0
#17 0.38771300  1.0   1.0    1.0
#18 0.14773708  0.0   1.0    1.0
#19 0.43928154  0.5   0.5    0.5
#20 0.08901350  0.0   0.5    0.5
#21 0.84174743  0.0   0.5    0.5
#22 0.93173871  0.0   0.5    0.5
#23 0.80795517  1.0   1.0    1.0
share|improve this answer
    
I think ave(DF$temp, cumsum(DF$temp), FUN = sum) should work as well. – kdauria Dec 8 '13 at 17:16
    
@Kevin: Yeah, you're right! In this case, summing the values works, too. And, perhaps, it is faster too, because it avoids turning to logical before indexing? Although, I'd still might prefer x[x != 0], because it declares exactly what the averaging function is. – alexis_laz Dec 8 '13 at 17:28

A loop along the following lines should do the trick for you -

for(i in seq(nrow(df)))
{
  if (df[i,"v1"] == 0) df[i,"v1"] <- df[i-1,"v1"]
}

Output -

> df
   v1 somedata
1   1       33
2   2       24
3   1       36
4   0       49
5   2       89
6   2       48
7   0        4
8   1       98
9   1       60
10  2       76
> 
> for(i in seq(nrow(df)))
+ {
+   if (df[i,"v1"] == 0) df[i,"v1"] <- df[i-1,"v1"]
+ }
> df
   v1 somedata
1   1       33
2   2       24
3   1       36
4   1       49
5   2       89
6   2       48
7   2        4
8   1       98
9   1       60
10  2       76
share|improve this answer

I suggest using the run length encoding functions, it's a natural way for dealing with steaks in a data set. Using @Kevin's example vector:

temp = c(1,0,0,0,.5,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0.5,0,0,0,1)
y <- rle(temp)
#str(y)
#List of 2
# $ lengths: int [1:11] 1 3 1 5 1 5 1 1 1 3 ...
# $ values : num [1:11] 1 0 0.5 0 1 0 1 0 0.5 0 ...
# - attr(*, "class")= chr "rle"


for( i in seq(y$values)[-1] ) {
   if(y$values[i] == 0) {
      y$lengths[i-1] = y$lengths[i] + y$lengths[i-1]
      y$lengths[i] = 0
   }
}

#str(y)
#List of 2
# $ lengths: num [1:11] 4 0 6 0 6 0 2 0 4 0 ...
# $ values : num [1:11] 1 0 0.5 0 1 0 1 0 0.5 0 ...
# - attr(*, "class")= chr "rle"

inverse.rle(y)
#  [1] 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5
# [20] 0.5 0.5 0.5 1.0
share|improve this answer
1  
You need some A-1 data sauce to go with those steaks? :-0 – Carl Witthoft Dec 6 '13 at 12:33

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