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Just found this SO question that happened to solve my problem with initializing a Boolean array initializing a boolean array in java. However, while it gave me code that will work, the asker wasn't trying the code that I was running that wasn't working, and I'd actually like to know why it doesn't work. This was the code I was trying:

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];
for(Boolean value : array) {
    value = false;
}

This is the functional code from that other question:

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];
Arrays.fill(array, Boolean.FALSE);

I'm just curious why the for loop approach doesn't work?

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5  
This is an issue of Java references being passed by value. With each iteration, it will assign it into the value variable, but when you assign value to false, you are overwriting the reference, not the actual variable inside the array. For each never works when assigning into the array –  Nathan Merrill Dec 6 '13 at 6:22
    
That's really good to know. Thanks @MrTi I'm amazed I didn't hit this problem sooner. –  sage88 Dec 6 '13 at 6:36
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8 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted
Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];
for(Boolean value : array) {
    value = false;
}

The java enhanced for loop uses an iterator to go through the array. The iterator returns a reference to the object, but java passes the reference by value, so you are unable to change what the reference points to, which is what you are trying to do with value = false.

EDIT:
As it turns out, for a normal array, instead of converting to a List and using an iterator, java does the following:

for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) 
{
    Boolean value = array[i]; //here's how we get the value that's referred to 
    ...                       //in the enchanced for loop  
}

While we are not using an iterator, the fact that Java passes references by value still explains what's going on here.
END of EDIT

If this were an array of objects with certain instance members, you would be able change said members, but not what the object, itself, references.

As others have suggested, to get around this, simple use a regular for loop and manually assign values to indexed slots in the array, ie:

Boolean[] b_values = new Boolean[5];
for(int i = 0; i < b_values.length; i++) 
{
    b_values[i] = Boolean.FALSE; 
}
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1  
This is the only correct answer so far. +1 –  Nathan Merrill Dec 6 '13 at 6:28
    
@MrTi Thanks, I try :) –  Steve P. Dec 6 '13 at 6:28
4  
I just find the amount of answers here that don't really answer the question staggering. –  Nathan Merrill Dec 6 '13 at 6:29
1  
Technically, for arrays, Java does not use an iterator. –  user2357112 Dec 6 '13 at 6:42
1  
@sᴜʀᴇsʜᴀᴛᴛᴀ Just took a look, I knew most of the deficiencies of for-each loops that they list at the end, but apparently not the most important one. I must have tried this earlier and had it not work and just switched back to standard for loop without thinking about it. –  sage88 Dec 6 '13 at 7:14
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The reason why the code wasn't running is because when you mentioned that

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];
for(Boolean value : array) {
    value = false;
}

You are actually creating a new reference type called "Array of Boolean" and it contains only references to the five objects of Boolean class but the object doesn't exists as you haven't created them.

While in the second code

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];
Arrays.fill(array, Boolean.FALSE);

You are using cached object of Boolean class and adding it to the array you created using java.util.Arrays class. Boolean is a wrapper class in java and as only two possible values can be possible either true and false to avoid the overhead in creating them java already creates them for you and make them available for ready use.

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value = true; is internally value = new Boolean(true); i.e it is creating a new Object in the pool. The value object refers to that Boolean object.Wrapper classes are immutable.

enter image description here

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Yes Boolean[] can be initialize at for loop. For that you need to set value with array index, instead of enhanced for loop. Have a look at following loop.

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];
for(int i=0;i<array.length;i++) {
    array[i] = Boolean.FALSE;
}
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It's very hand-wavy, IMHO. –  Steve P. Dec 6 '13 at 6:29
1  
This definitely works, and I think it's my favorite implementation given. Steve P's answer is more toward my question though. –  sage88 Dec 6 '13 at 6:50
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Because value is a copy of an array element and not the actual element in array.

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];    
    for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
             array[i]= false;           
    }

Just for reference: How for each works

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It's an array of Boolean references with no real object assigned. You need to do this.

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];
for(Boolean value : array) {
    value = new Boolean(false);
}

EDIT: This doesn't solve the problem. It's the same. In the for loop, the variable value is not a reference to the original array. That's why you need to do.

Boolean[] array = new Boolean[5];    
for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    array[i]= false;           
}
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3  
Autoboxing solves that problem. –  user2357112 Dec 6 '13 at 6:21
    
oh yes. my bad. –  John Dec 6 '13 at 6:22
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To illustrate Changing the Reference and Changing the value of member if Reference, I tried with User defined class , posting here what I have tried and the observation -thanks @SteveP

//Case 1 Trying to Change Reference

    Boolean[] array1 = new Boolean[5];
    Arrays.fill(array1, Boolean.FALSE);
    for(Boolean value : array1) { // Warning here The value of the local variable value is not used
        value = Boolean.TRUE;
    }

    System.out.println(" Elements ==> "+array1[0]+" -  "+array1[1]);

this will print Elements ==> false - false , Reference will not be able to modify

Case 2 Trying to Change Reference with user defined class

        MyBool[] array3 = new MyBool[5];
    MyBool boolInst2=new MyBool( Boolean.FALSE);
    MyBool boolNew=new MyBool( Boolean.TRUE);

    Arrays.fill(array3,boolInst2 );
    for(MyBool value : array3) {  // Warning here The value of the local variable value is not used
        value = boolNew;
    }
    System.out.println(" Elements ==> "+array3[0].flag+" -  "+array3[1].flag);

this will print Elements ==> false - false, Reference will not be able to modify

Case 3 Changing the values of members of an object (MyBool.value),

            MyBool[] array2 = new MyBool[5];
    MyBool boolInst=new MyBool( Boolean.FALSE);
    Arrays.fill(array2,boolInst );
    for(MyBool value : array2) {
        value.flag = Boolean.TRUE;
    }
    System.out.println(" Elements ==> "+array2[0].flag+" -  "+array2[2].flag);

this will print Elements ==> true - true , Values are updated

class MyBool{
    public Boolean flag;
    public MyBool(Boolean flag){
        this.flag=flag;
    }
}
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In Short: While Enumerating the array using for loop, you cannot modify the element of collection you are iterating through. Consider it as read only.

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