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so I'm running a Process in Java which starts a C++ program. The C++ program writes some data on the OutputStream and from within Java I read that stream.

The Implementation looks like that:

    ....
    ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder(filepath);
    Process process;
    InputStream processStream;
    try {
        Process p = pb.start();
        ProcessOutput processOutput = new ProcessOutput(p.getInputStream());
        processOutput.run();
        return processOutput.getRequestString();
    } catch (IOException e1) {
        LOG.error(e1.getMessage());
    }

The variable filepath is a String who points to the executable C++ program. The class ProcessOutput is a Thread that reads the InputStream and transforms it into a String which can later be retrieved via ProcessOutput.getRequestString().

The application seems to behave correctly but I'm now curious if any timing problems can arise from the way I built the solution. Is it possible that when I call processOutput.getRequestString() that the process hasn't finished yet or do I block the execution until the process is finished?

I'm developing Java now for some time but processes/threads still get me confused. If anyone sees some issues with this implementation I would be happy to improve it.

As requested the ProcessOutput class:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

public class ProcessOutput extends Thread {

    private InputStream inputStream;
    private String requestString;

    public ProcessOutput(InputStream inputStream) {
        this.inputStream = inputStream;
        setDaemon(true);
    }

    public void run() {
        BufferedReader br = null;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        String line;
        try {

            br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(this.inputStream));
            while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
                sb.append(line);
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            if (br != null) {
                try {
                    br.close();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }
        requestString = sb.toString();
    }

    public String getRequestString() {
        return requestString;
    }

}

Edit: As zapl mentioned in the comments I'm not gaining anything from using a Thread since the application depends on the result of the process and has to wait for it to end anyways.

share|improve this question
1  
I think the answer is in the run() method of your ProcessOutput class. Does it read until end of stream, or does it return earlier? –  isnot2bad Dec 6 '13 at 7:06
1  
What is the point of a Thread when all you do is waiting for it to finish? Total execution time isn't going to change and the workload is just switching to a new thread. Besides adding all the overhead of switching threads and a huge source of possible errors you gain nothing. Don't use a thread in that case. –  zapl Dec 6 '13 at 7:15
1  
The idea was to bypass requirement of wrapping it in a process and just call the C++ methods more directly from the java code. Process is an ok way of doing it, but can be limiting in that only in/out of an executable is used, and I've had experience of doing it both ways. Opinion was asked for and I offered an opinion. –  Chris Dec 6 '13 at 7:19
1  
I actually would strongly consider keeping the thread, primarily for not blocking any UI or user actions in your app - this way, the main app can still respond to the user while the thread is blocked waiting for the process to finish. –  Chris Dec 6 '13 at 7:29
1  
Don't keep that "thread". A method call is always executed within the calling thread even if the class is called Thread or Runnable (hint: call start instead of run). A thread blocked waiting for another thread is no different when it comes to UI. If you want to do it asynchronously you can't return a value direclty, you'll need an asynchronous callback. Typically back on the UI thread (e.g. for swing). –  zapl Dec 6 '13 at 8:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use some some synchronizers like countdown or cyclicbarrier etc. I added countdown implementation as below. I see no harm in running the IO logic in separate thread if you think it might take sometime in some cases. In getRequestString call you can decide how you want to treat the scenario if its taking too long.

public class ProcessOutput {
    private final InputStream inputStream;
    final CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(1);

    public ProcessOutput(InputStream inputStream) {
        this.inputStream = inputStream;
    }

    public String getRequestString(final long timeoutMilliSeconds) throws InterruptedException {
        StreamReader reader = new StreamReader();
        new Thread(reader).start();
        latch.await(timeoutMilliSeconds,TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
        //You can check if requestString not yet set or null after waiting for timeout throw some application exception to tell the client that its taking too long.
        return reader.getRequestString();
    }

    private class StreamReader implements Runnable {

        String requestString;
        @Override
        public void run() {
            BufferedReader br = null;
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

            String line;
            try {

                br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inputStream));
                while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
                    sb.append(line);
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } finally {
                if (br != null) {
                    try {
                        br.close();
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
            }
            requestString = sb.toString();
            //Work done now
            latch.countDown();
        }

        public String getRequestString() {
            return requestString;
        } ;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can call process.waitFor() for the code to wait for completion of a process. But, as a suggestion, its not a good practice to invoke process directly if you don't consume the error/output streams. You can uses apache commons exec library which is handy.

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You could probably add a join() on the processOutput Thread so that it'd wait for the ProcessBuilder Thread to complete it's execution and ensure that you get the required request String.

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