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I'm supposed to design/implement a cryptographic solution to a video streaming app intended for both IOS and Android. My main cryptographic requirement is to keep video streams encrypted on the mobile device and prevent the users from running it on any other device/program. So, I need a good method to decrypt the stream during each play without bothering the user to enter a password each time.

Problem is that I'm new to cryptography(and new to mobile programming as well) and my startup company doesn't have enough resources to hire an expert for this. I was doing lot of R&D on the state of the art cryptographic design practices by reading several online resources as well as stackoverflow. I have learned few important principles and naturally ended up in several new questions whose answers could not be found anywhere since these questions are not too specific to any algorithm.

What I learned was :

  1. Cryptography would make my streaming slow. I need to use this judiciously.
  2. The developers/designers shouldn't try to 'invent' new cryptographic algorithms on their own. It is always advised to use the existing proven solutions.
  3. The strength/weakness of the solution is not in the design/selection of the algorithm, but in the key management and the key management policies
  4. It is impossible to store a decryption key on a mobile device and everybody advices against it. So, this rules out the possibility of using any PKI based schemes. The only possible solution is to ask the user to enter a password each time to decrypt the stream.
  5. I had an idea to use the ID-based encryption scheme and to implement a PKG on the mobile device itself. But soon I realized that this also needs the storage of a 'secret' on the device which turns out to be the same problem as above.

After reading lot of articles/problems/solutions, I ended up in an outline of what I could do.

  1. I would implement the solution in C++ to obfuscate the code as much as possible.
  2. I would use AES 256 symmetric scheme for encryption/decryption.
  3. I would use several parameters from the device to and multiple levels of hashing (and adding the parameters in each level as salt to make it as complicated as possible) to derive a hash which will act as the key. This would (hopefully) identify my user installation securely. This is inspired from here.
  4. I would encrypt the data on the device itself after downloading it to the device. From the server to client I would do some kind of scrambling, whose key would be encoded as the algorithm (for e.g : space filling curve methods). I know that this could be the weakest link, but I would find a better solution to this later.

My questions are :

  1. Even after reading all of these, one thing is not clear to me. There are several algorithms out there. How does an attacker knows which algorithm is used in a product? Only if the attacker knows it, he can devise methods to crack it, right? Just to take an example of the weak DES algorithm implementation, only if the attacker knows that I'm using DES, she can find ways to crack it. How does she knows that? Can I fool the attacker by designing an interface/declare strings in the program to make the attacker believe that I'm implementing AES, but actually I'm implementing mere DES? Do cryptographic designers resort to such methods?

  2. Is my method of generating a key violating the general advice to not to reinvent newer algorithms, reuse tried and tested solutions? I believe that I don't do that. I use the standard AES, but just a finding a new (just discovering myself, I know that several people would have done this before) method to manage the key. Am I wrong?

I'm sorry that my questions are slightly on the abstract side. This is because I'm still on the design phase and yet to implement something concretely.

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Unfortunately, encryption does not help you with obfuscation. More on the subject: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/09/27/… –  ntoskrnl Dec 6 '13 at 14:08
1  
Decryption is much faster than video decoding. Especially if you reduce the number of rounds a bit, since in a DRM scheme the strength of the algorithm doesn't matter much, compared to the impossibility of secure key management. For example ChaCha8 will decrypt several hundred megabytes per second on a single core. –  CodesInChaos Dec 6 '13 at 14:27
    
@ntoskrnl: Good link, thanks. –  PermanentGuest Dec 6 '13 at 16:32
    
@CodesInChaos:Thanks for your input. I'm yet to implement any of this. –  PermanentGuest Dec 6 '13 at 16:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My main cryptographic requirement is to keep video streams encrypted on the mobile device and prevent the users from running it on any other device/program.

This is called "DRM". There are two types of DRM: DRM that has been cracked, and DRM that nobody has bothered trying to crack yet.

my startup company doesn't have enough resources to hire an expert for this

Your startup company should be doing other things with its time, then.

I would use AES 256 symmetric scheme for encryption/decryption.

This violates #1, #4, and #5 of what you learned.

How does an attacker knows which algorithm is used in a product?

By looking at your code.

Can I fool the attacker by designing an interface/declare strings in the program to make the attacker believe that I'm implementing AES, but actually I'm implementing mere DES?

Only really stupid attackers. Attackers with an IQ higher than that of your average rock would simply modify your app to write all decoded bytes to disk, after you have done all the work to decode them. After all, the bytes must be in your process decoded for anything to be able to display them to the user, which means the bytes are available to an attacker who has modified your app.

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Thanks for your input. I read the history of DRM attempts by various giants and how each of that got cracked in no time. And the last part very useful. It shouldn't take for a normal programmer to reuse my code. I had never thought about it (see the inexperience with encryption surfaces out ;) ) –  PermanentGuest Dec 9 '13 at 10:29

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