Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While demonstrating Python's regex functionality, I wrote a small program to compare the return values of re.search(), re.findall() and re.finditer(). I'm aware that re.search() will only find one match per line and that re.findall() only returns the matched substring(s) and not any location information. However, I was surprised see to see that the matched substring can differ between the three functions.

Code (available on GitHub):

#! /usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

# License: CC-BY-NC-SA 3.0

import re
import codecs

# download kate_chopin_the_awakening_and_other_short_stories.txt
# from Project Gutenberg:
# http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/160.txt.utf-8
# with wget:
# wget http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/160.txt.utf-8 -O kate_chopin_the_awakening_and_other_short_stories.txt


# match for something o'clock, with valid numerical time or
# any English word with proper capitalization

oclock = re.compile(r"""
                    (
                          [A-Z]?[a-z]+ # word mit max. 1 capital letter
                        | 1[012]       # 10,11,12
                        | [1-9]        # 1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9
                    )
                    \s
                    o'clock""",
                    re.VERBOSE)

path = "kate_chopin_the_awakening_and_other_short_stories.txt"

print
print "re.search()"
print
print u"{:>6} {:>6} {:>6}\t{}".format("Line","Start","End","Match")
print u"{:=>6} {:=>6} {:=>6}\t{}".format('','','','=====')

with  codecs.open(path,mode='r',encoding='utf-8') as f:
    for lineno, line in enumerate(f):
        atime = oclock.search(line)
        if  atime:
            print u"{:>6} {:>6} {:>6}\t{}".format(lineno,
                                            atime.start(),
                                            atime.end(),
                                            atime.group())


print
print "re.findall()"
print
print u"{:>6} {:>6} {:>6}\t{}".format("Line","Start","End","Match")
print u"{:=>6} {:=>6} {:=>6}\t{}".format('','','','=====')
with  codecs.open(path,mode='r',encoding='utf-8') as f:
    for lineno, line in enumerate(f):
        times = oclock.findall(line)
        if times:
            print u"{:>6} {:>6} {:>6}\t{}".format(lineno,
                                            '',
                                            '',
                                            ' '.join(times))


print
print "re.finditer()"
print
print u"{:>6} {:>6} {:>6}\t{}".format("Line","Start","End","Match")
print u"{:=>6} {:=>6} {:=>6}\t{}".format('','','','=====')
with  codecs.open(path,mode='r',encoding='utf-8') as f:
    for lineno, line in enumerate(f):
        times = oclock.finditer(line)
        for m in times:
            print u"{:>6} {:>6} {:>6}\t{}".format(lineno,
                                            m.start(),
                                            m.end(),
                                            m.group())

and Output (tested on Python 2.7.3 and 2.7.5):

re.search()

  Line  Start    End    Match
====== ====== ======    =====
   248      7     21    eleven o'clock
  1520     24     35    one o'clock
  1975     21     33    nine o'clock
  2106      4     16    four o'clock
  4443     19     30    ten o'clock

re.findall()

  Line  Start    End    Match
====== ====== ======    =====
   248                  eleven
  1520                  one
  1975                  nine
  2106                  four
  4443                  ten

re.finditer()

  Line  Start    End    Match
====== ====== ======    =====
   248      7     21    eleven o'clock
  1520     24     35    one o'clock
  1975     21     33    nine o'clock
  2106      4     16    four o'clock
  4443     19     30    ten o'clock

What am I missing something here? Why doesn't re.findall() return the o'clock bit?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

According to re.findall documentation:

... If one or more groups are present in the pattern, return a list of groups; this will be a list of tuples if the pattern has more than one group.

The pattern contains only one group; findall returns a list of the group.


>>> import re
>>> re.findall('abc', 'abc')
['abc']
>>> re.findall('a(b)c', 'abc')
['b']
>>> re.findall('a(b)(c)', 'abc')
[('b', 'c')]

Using non-capturing version of parentheses:

>>> re.findall('a(?:b)c', 'abc')
['abc']
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the tip on non-capturing parentheses! –  Livius Dec 6 '13 at 13:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.