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I created a class called Matrix with a 2D array. I can run it with the constructor, copy constructor and destructor. When I introduce the unary negation operator, I get a run time error.

https://gist.github.com/anonymous/7823794

#ifndef MATRIX_H
#define MATRIX_H
class Matrix
{
public:
    Matrix(int rSize=3, int cSize=3);
    Matrix(const Matrix& m);
    ~Matrix();
    bool setValue(int rSize, int cSize, int value);
    bool getValue(int rVal, int cVal, int& value)const;
    const Matrix operator- ();
private:
    int rowSize;
    int columnSize;
    int** arr;
};
#endif



#include<iostream>
#include"Matrix.h"
using namespace std;
Matrix::Matrix(int rSize,int cSize)
{
    columnSize = cSize;
    rowSize = rSize;
    arr = new int* [rowSize];
    for(int i=0; i<rowSize; i++)
        arr[i] = new int[columnSize];
    for(int j=0; j<rowSize; j++)
    {
        for(int k=0; k<columnSize; k++)
            arr[j][k] = 0;
    }

}
Matrix::Matrix(const Matrix& m)
{
    columnSize = m.columnSize;
    rowSize = m.rowSize;
    arr = new int* [rowSize];
    for(int i=0; i<rowSize; i++)
    {
        arr[i] = new int [columnSize];
    }
    for(int i=0; i<rowSize; i++)
    {
        for(int j=0; j<columnSize; j++)
            arr[i][j] = m.arr[i][j];
    }
}
Matrix::~Matrix()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < rowSize; ++i)
        delete [] arr[i];
    delete [] arr;
}
bool Matrix::setValue(int rVal, int cVal, int value)
{
    if((rVal<0)||(cVal<0)||(rVal>rowSize-1)||(cVal>columnSize-1))
        return false;
    arr[rVal][cVal] = value;
    return true;
}
bool Matrix::getValue(int rVal, int cVal, int& value)const
{
    if((rVal<0)||(cVal<0)||(rVal>rowSize-1)||(cVal>columnSize-1))
        return false;
    value = arr[rVal][cVal];
    return true;
}
const Matrix Matrix:: operator- ()
{
    Matrix m(*this);
    for (int i = 0; i< rowSize; i++)
    {
        for(int j=0; j<columnSize; j++)
            m.arr[i][j] = (this->arr[i][j])* -1 ;
    }
    return m;
}





#include<iostream>
#include"Matrix.h"
using namespace std;
void main()
{
    Matrix m(4, 5);
    Matrix m2(m);
    m2.setValue(1,2,12);
    int x;
    m2.getValue(1,2,x);
    Matrix m3;
    m3 = -m2;
}

Edit: Following @unwind and @interjay advice, I implemented the assignment operator first and returned a value, not a reference, for the negation operator and it works. Thank you all for your help

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2  
You should paste the code here, so it's available if someone in the distant future sees your post. –  kviiri Dec 6 '13 at 13:30
    
@Abhineet Is there an easier way to indent than adding four spaces to each line manually? –  user3012044 Dec 6 '13 at 13:51
    
@user3012044 Select the code and press the {} button in the toolbar or Ctrl+K. –  interjay Dec 6 '13 at 13:53
    
The simple answer is to use std::vector rather than managing memory yourself. If you really want to juggle pointers for educational reasons, always remember the Rule of Three –  Mike Seymour Dec 6 '13 at 14:04
    
Select the text you want to indent and press "CTRL+k". It will automatically indent the codes. –  Abhineet Dec 6 '13 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't have an assignment operator in your class, which will cause double deletion of the member pointer after an assignment (and you're assigning in the line m3 = -m2;).

You should obey the rule of three.

unwind is also correct that the negation operator should return by value: You should never return a reference to a local variable from a function as that leads to undefined behavior.

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Should I also return the'+' and '-' operators by value or can I return those by reference? –  user3012044 Dec 6 '13 at 15:01
    
@user3012044 By value. You can't return a local variable or a temporary by reference because it will stop existing when the function returns. –  interjay Dec 6 '13 at 16:19

Declaring the operator to return const Matrix& and then returning a local variable is wrong. That's a dangling reference, surely?

See for reference this answer where the operator returns an actual new value, not a reference. This makes a lot more sense to me.

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