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I am having difficulty executing a program that I wrote with structs. My program has a header file, an initialization file, and a main file. When I compiled it, the compiler complained and later I found out that I forward declared my struct name as Company but initialized it using company so I changed it to Company but still the compiler complains after I did this. How can I fix this? Any help will be greatly appreciated. Below is my code for my three files:

structs.h:

#ifndef STRUCTS_H
#define STRUCTS_H

struct Company{
  double salary;
  int workers;
  int bosses;
}

#endif

initialization.cpp:

Company a = {1200340.99, 30000, 3};
Company b = {500320.85, 5000, 2};

main.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "structs.h"

void PrintInfo(Company company){
  using namespace std;
  cout << "salary: " << Company.salary << endl;
  cout << "workers: " << Company.workers << endl;
  cout << "bosses: " << Company.bosses << endl;
}

int main(){
  PrintInfo(a);
  PrintInfo(b);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Seems like you have missed the ';' at the struct :-) –  Abhineet Dec 6 '13 at 13:37
1  
Note that 'forward declared' means something different. There's no forward declaration in this code just regular declaration. –  john Dec 6 '13 at 13:38
    
please make sure you show the exact error messages when writing your questions. –  crashmstr Dec 6 '13 at 13:51

3 Answers 3

  1. You need a ; after the definition of struct Company

  2. In PrintInfo you need to reference the object company (lowercase c) and not the class Company (uppercase C), e.g.

    cout << "salary: " << company.salary << endl;   // lowercase c
    cout << "workers: " << company.workers << endl; // lowercase c
    cout << "bosses: " << company.bosses << endl;   // lowercase c
    
  3. As a and b is initialized (globally) in a different source file you must redeclare them with external linkage in the source file that need to access them using the extern keyword, e.g.

    // main.cpp
    #include <iostream>
    #include "structs.h"
    
    extern Company a;
    extern Company b;
    
    /* ... */
    

    Consider initializing a and b where they are used instead:

    int main() {
        Company a = {1200340.99, 30000, 3}; // Init here.
        Company b = {500320.85, 5000, 2};   // Init here.
    
        PrintInfo(a);
        PrintInfo(b);
        // return 0; // Unnecessary in main function.
    }
    
  4. In function PrintInfo, as you are not modifying the argument you should pass the class Company as reference to const to avoid copying, i.e. declare the function using this:

    void PrintInfo(const Company& company)
    
share|improve this answer
    
Also some extern is missing for a and b in the OP's sample. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 6 '13 at 13:52
    
@g-makulik You're right. Added to answer. –  Snps Dec 6 '13 at 14:04

A structure requires a ';' at the end

struct Company{
  double salary;
  int workers;
  int bosses;
};
share|improve this answer

In addition to the other answers, the code in main.cpp knows nothing about a and b in your initialization.cpp.

You need to either add an extern declaration in structs.h or move those into main.cpp.

But, you should also consider not making them global variables, like this:

int main()
{
    Company a = {1200340.99, 30000, 3};
    Company b = {500320.85, 5000, 2};
    PrintInfo(a);
    PrintInfo(b);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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