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I want to create a function that will take a string and an integer as parameters and return a string that contains the string parameter repeated the given number of times.

For example:

std::string MakeDuplicate( const std::string& str, int x )
{
    ...
}

Calling MakeDuplicate( "abc", 3 ); would return "abcabcabc".

I know I can do this just by looping x number of times but I'm sure there must be a better way.

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2  
Why 123? Don't you mean MakeDuplicate("abc",3)? –  Pace Jan 11 '10 at 15:02
1  
What makes you be so sure that there must be a better way? –  Daniel Daranas Jan 11 '10 at 15:20
    
Just since you were wondering about a standard way, no, there isn't one. There is a constructor that will repeat a single character n times. std::string s(9, 'A'); –  GManNickG Jan 11 '10 at 15:25
    
Consensus seems to be that there is no idiomatic way of doing this. Accepting top answer. –  Richard Jan 12 '10 at 12:29
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4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I don't see a problem with looping, just make sure you do a reserve first:

std::string MakeDuplicate( const std::string& str, int x )
{
    std::string newstr;
    newstr.reserve(str.length()*x); // prevents multiple reallocations

    // loop...

    return newstr;
}
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+1 Was just about to post about reserving the memory. –  MikeSep Jan 11 '10 at 15:08
    
Although it should read newstr.reserve(...) –  MikeSep Jan 11 '10 at 15:09
    
Thanks MikeSep, nice catch. Corrected. –  luke Jan 11 '10 at 15:10
    
Looping is fine, its just one of those things that 'feels' like there would be a more explicit way of achieving it, but maybe there isn't. –  Richard Jan 11 '10 at 15:19
1  
A slightly more efficient version would probably be to begin with copying the actual string, and then looping x-1 times. Although it would require a check for 0 to avoid an unnecessary copy. –  Matthieu M. Jan 11 '10 at 20:14
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At some point it will have to be a loop. You may be able to hide the looping in some fancy language idiom, but ultimately you're going to have to loop.

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For small 'x' simple loop is your friend. For large 'x and relatively short 'str' we can think of a "smarter" solution by reusing already concatenated string.

std::string MakeDuplicate( const std::string& str, unsigned int x ) {

  std::string newstr;
  if (x>0) {
    unsigned int y = 2;
    newstr.reserve(str.length()*x);  
    newstr.append(str);
    while (y<x) {
      newstr.append(newstr);
      y*=2;
    }
    newstr.append(newstr.c_str(), (x-y/2)*str.length());
  }
  return newstr;
}

Or something like that :o) (I think it can be written in a nicer way but idea is there).

EDIT: I was intersted myself and did some tests comparing three solutions on my notebook with visual studio (reuse version, simple loop with preallocation, simple copy&loop-1 without preallocation). Results as expected: for small x(<10) preallocation version is generally fastest, no preallocation was tiny bit slower, for larger x speedup of 'reuse' version is really significant (log n vs n complexity). Nice, I just can't think of any real problem that could use it :o)

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There is an alternative to a loop, its called recursion, and of recursion tail-recursion is the nicest variety since you can theoretically do it till the end of time -- just like a loop :D

p.s., tail-recursion is often syntactic sugar for a loop -- however in the case of procedural languages (C++), the compiler is generally at loss, so the tail-recursion is not optimised and you might run out of memory (but if you wrote a recursion that runs out of memory than you have bigger problems) :D

more downvotes please !!

recursion is obviously not a construct used in computer science for the same job as looping

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4  
It's elegant, but when somebody types in MakeDuplicate("very long string ... ", 200000) they are gonna cry :) –  Skurmedel Jan 11 '10 at 15:06
3  
Even recursion is often reduced to looping for efficiency... –  John Weldon Jan 11 '10 at 15:06
    
Looping can be parallelized, but recursion cannot. –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 11 '10 at 15:07
1  
C++ does not (generally) optimize tail recursion. You could end up with a stack overflow with such a solution. –  Billy ONeal Jan 11 '10 at 15:18
2  
Why is it downvoted? It's ideal answer to demonstrate why elegant recursive solution is not suitable (for large x at least). –  MaR Jan 11 '10 at 15:57
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