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I normally use a code like following to pipe data from a file to gnuplot and create a picture during the Perl script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $in="file.dat";

open(GP, "| gnuplot") or die "$!\n";
print GP << "GNU_EOF";

set terminal png size 1920,1080 font 'Verdana,15' dashed
set output 'out.png'
plot "$in"

GNU_EOF

close(GP);

I have to define "GNU_EOF" instead of 'GNU_EOF' so I can use variables like $in.

Now I want to use data which isn't read from a file directly. My code looks like:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

open(GP, "| gnuplot") or die "$!\n";
print GP << 'GNU_EOF';

set terminal png size 1920,1080 font 'Verdana,15' dashed
set output 'out.png'
plot '-'

GNU_EOF

open(INFILE,"< stuff.dat") or die "$!\n";
while (my $line = <INFILE>) {

for my $i (1..10){
    # do some stuff to calculate my data points stored in $x and $y
    print GP "$x $y\n";
}
print GP "EOF\n";
}

close(INFILE);
close(GP);

If I try this using "GNU_EOF" to be able to define variables in the heredoc, I am getting errors like:

gnuplot> 187 0.05
         ^
         line 1: invalid command

I don't know

  • why I have to use "" for the heredoc to get the desired variable expansion and

  • why I get errors for the second example.

Help is highly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
My guess is that you need to pass something more than just the two coordinates to gnuplot. What does file.dat look like in your first example? –  Dave Dec 6 '13 at 14:44
2  
For me your example works fine without the line print GP "EOF\n"; and with pngcairo (instead of png because of the dashed terminal option). –  Christoph Dec 6 '13 at 14:48
    
@Christoph, You misread what I wrote because I fully know the error from was gnuplot. Anyway, I've already removed my comment for other reasons. –  ikegami Dec 6 '13 at 15:16
1  
@Christoph, The print GP "EOF\n" should not be removed. It tells gnuplot's plot when to stop reading from -. (My version prompts me to use e, but EOF apparently works too.) –  ikegami Dec 6 '13 at 15:17
1  
The Chart::Gnuplot module provides (incomplete) bindings to the gnuplot program, which might be preferable to templating the commands yourself. –  amon Dec 6 '13 at 15:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I solved it. Sorry for the incomplete question, I wanted to give a minimal example to avoid confusion. Unfortunately my question missed the important part. Like said in the comments I use several loops to generate data and pipe it to gnuplot:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

open(GP, "| gnuplot") or die "$!\n";
print GP << 'GNU_EOF';

set terminal png size 1920,1080 font 'Verdana,15' dashed
set output 'out.png'
plot    '-' t "one", \
        '-' t "two"

GNU_EOF

open(INFILE,"< stuff.dat") or die "$!\n";
while (my $line = <INFILE>) {

for my $i (1..10){
    # do some stuff to calculate data points stored in $x and $y
    print GP "$x $y\n";
}
print GP "EOF\n";
}

for my $i (1..50){
    # do some other stuff to calculate data points stored in $x and $y
    print GP "$x $y\n";
}
print GP "EOF\n";
}

close(INFILE);
close(GP);

I don't know why, but using 'GNU_EOF' (without variable expansion) I can define several plot with the line brake command \.

Using "GNU_EOF" I have to define it in one line:

plot '-' t "one", '-' t "two"

Sorry for the struggle, but maybe this is also helpful for someone else (and maybe you can explain this behaviour to me).

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1  
<<"X" is like "..." and <<'X' is close to '...'. If you want to include a slash in a double-quoted string, you must escape it. –  ikegami Dec 6 '13 at 17:40

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