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This program is supposed to store time in seconds since midnight and display it in standard and universal time. It runs, but the set Time function has an error in it, as the time never changes. I'm assuming that something isn't being returned right, but I can't find the error.

Header file :

#ifndef TIME_H
#define TIME_H

class Time
{
public:
    Time(); //constructor
    void setTime(int, int, int );
    void printUniversal(); //print time in universal-time format
    void printStandard(); // print time in standard-time format
private:
    int secondsSinceMidnight;
};

#endif 

.cpp file

Time::Time()//constructor
{
    secondsSinceMidnight = 0;

}

void Time::setTime(int h, int m, int s)
{
    if ((h >= 0 && h < 24) && (m >= 0 && m < 60) && (s >= 0) && (s < 60))
    {
        int hoursInSecs = (h * 3600);
        int minutesInSecs = (m * 60);
        secondsSinceMidnight = (minutesInSecs + hoursInSecs);
    }
    else
        throw invalid_argument(
            "hour, minute and/or second was out of range");
}

void Time::printUniversal()
{
    int secondsSinceMidnight = 0;
    int hours = (secondsSinceMidnight / 3600);
    int remainder = (secondsSinceMidnight % 3600);
    int minutes = (remainder / 60);
    int seconds = (remainder % 60);
    cout <<setfill('0')<<setw(2)<<hours<<":"
    <<setw(2)<<minutes<<":"<<setw(2)<<seconds<<endl;
}

void Time::printStandard()
{
    int secondsSinceMidnight = 0;
    int hours = (secondsSinceMidnight / 3600);
    int remainder = (secondsSinceMidnight % 3600);
    int minutes = (remainder / 60);
    int seconds = (remainder % 60);
    cout<<((hours == 0 || hours == 12) ? 12 : hours % 12) << ":"
        << setfill('0') <<setw(2)<<minutes<< ":"<<setw(2)
        <<seconds<<(hours < 12 ? "AM" : "PM")<<"\n"; 
}

And the main program :

int main()
{
    Time t; //instantiate object t of class Time
    //output Time object t's initial values
    cout<<"The initial universal time is ";
    t.printUniversal();
    cout<<"\nThe initial standard time is ";
    t.printStandard();

    int h;
    int m;
    int s;

    cout<<"\nEnter the hours, minutes and seconds to reset the time: "<<endl;
    cin>>h>>m>>s;

    t.setTime(h, m, s); //change time


    //output Time object t's new values
    cout<<"\n\nUniversal time after setTime is ";
    t.printUniversal();
    cout<<"\nStandard time after setTime is ";
    t.printStandard();
}
share|improve this question
1  
Small remark, probably not needed for this exercise, but if you return the time from the function as a string and then stream it to cout in your main(), then it would be at least as clear and you would be able to do other things with the strings (save to file, send over network, display in GUI,...) – stefaanv Dec 6 '13 at 15:31
up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your print functions you have a local variable with the same name as your field secondsSinceMidnight. It is shadowing it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much! I figured it would be something stupid like that. – Neko Dec 6 '13 at 15:22
    
Yeah, I forgot. Sorry! – Neko Dec 6 '13 at 15:57

Why there are int secondsSinceMidnight = 0; at the beginning of printUniversal() and printStandard(), this variable would cover member variable.

share|improve this answer

At the beginning of both of your print functions, you set secondsSinceMidnight = 0. Leave that in the constructor, but remove it from the print functions.

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