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How can I get a progress information from TBB parallel_for ?

tbb::parallel_for(tbb::blocked_range<size_t>(0,1000),classA);
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you are probably looking for the flow graphs in the TBB library, not just a loop ... –  user2485710 Dec 6 '13 at 16:54
    
I'll turn this around... how do you get progress from a serial for loop? –  Rick Dec 6 '13 at 19:23
    
@Rick ask the correct question, if with a serial loop you sent progress from the only 1 master thread through a simple/serial callback function... You can do the same but, attach the thread ID (sender) , compute each thread progress based of the scheduled amount job they have (use a static scheduling it will be easier :) and in the callback perform a "reduction" (progress += progress of 1 thread / total number of thread) !!! But take care progress has to be under "protection"(shared)... –  alexbuisson Dec 6 '13 at 21:28
1  
that was sort of my point. in your example concurrent_unordered_map with a key of thread id and a value that holds the count will work super well. –  Rick Dec 7 '13 at 2:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you only need to count how many iterations were executed to the moment, a simple solution could be to use a global atomic counter:

#include <tbb/tbb.h>
tbb::atomic<size_t> atomic_progress_counter;

void ParallelFoo() {
    tbb::parallel_for( tbb::blocked_range<size_t>(0, 1000),
        [&]( tbb::blocked_range<size_t> r ) {
            for( size_t i=r.begin(); i!=r.end(); ++i ) {
                Foo(i);
                ++atomic_progress_counter;
            }
        }
    );
}

However if the amount of work per iteration is small and HW concurrency is big, atomic increments of a shared variable can add noticeable overhead. For example, I would be careful with this method on Intel's Xeon Phi coprocessors.

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Rick's suggestion of using concurrent_unordered_map is a good one. Here is another way, which is essentially the same idea at a high level, but uses other TBB mechanisms in order to avoid dealing with explicit thread ids.

The zero_allocator is necessary here to close a timing hole between allocation and initialization of an element in concurrent_vector.

#include <tbb/tbb.h>

typedef size_t ProgressType;
typedef tbb::atomic<ProgressType> ProgressCounter;
tbb::enumerable_thread_specific<ProgressCounter> LocalCounters;

// zero_allocator is essential here.
tbb::concurrent_vector<ProgressCounter*, tbb::zero_allocator<ProgressCounter*> > LocalCounterPointers;

void AddToProgress(ProgressType delta) {
    bool exists;
    auto& i = LocalCounters.local(exists);
    i += delta;
    if( !exists )
        // First time we've seen this local counter.
        LocalCounterPointers.push_back(&i);
}

ProgressType GetProgress() {
    ProgressType sum = 0;
    size_t n = LocalCounterPointers.size();
    for( size_t i=0; i<n; ++i )
        // "if" deals with timing hold where slot in LocalCounterPointers was allocated but not initialized.
        if( auto* j = LocalCounterPointers[i] )
            sum += *j;
    return sum;
}

// Can be called asynchronously.
void ClearProgress() {
    size_t n = LocalCounterPointers.size();
    for( size_t i=0; i<n; ++i )
        // "if" deals with timing hold where slot in LocalCounterPointers was allocated but not initialized.
        if( auto* j = LocalCounterPointers[i] )
            *j = 0;

}

// Demo code
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    ClearProgress();
    tbb::parallel_for( tbb::blocked_range<int>(0, 1000),
                      [&]( tbb::blocked_range<int> r ) {
                         for( int i=r.begin(); i!=r.end(); ++i ) {
                             AddToProgress(1);
                             std::cout << "progress = " << GetProgress() << std::endl;
                         }
                      }
    );
}
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