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Why don't I get 20 after delivering e.g. "Obsidian" to Test(String pStr) if I call getMatInt() ?

Also tried .toString() after all String-declariations, also declarated e.g. "Obsidian" as new String a. Nothing works.

getBonus is aways returning a 0 instead of a 20/30/... . I already tried "Obsidian" and "obsidian", both doesnt work for me ...

public class test
{
  private String str;
  private int matInt;
  private int bonus;
  private int magic;

 public test(int pMagic, String pStr)
{
      int magic = pMagic;
      str = pStr;
 }

 private void materialEquals()
 {

     if(str.equals("Obsidian"))
     {
         matInt = 20;
     }
     .....
 }

 private void calcBonus()
 {
     materialEquals();
     bonus = magic * matInt;
 }

 public int getBonus()
 {
     calcBonus();
     return bonus;
 }

}       
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closed as off-topic by LaurentG, Sage, Reimeus, dimo414, user2864740 Dec 6 '13 at 20:42

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Reimeus, user2864740
  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – LaurentG, Sage, dimo414
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
Because you never call materialEquals, at least in this code. –  Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Dec 6 '13 at 20:33
    
Forgot to add it, it still doesnt work –  user3075910 Dec 6 '13 at 20:36
    
assuming it still doesn't work after your edit, in what context are you calling getMatInt()? Can we see your main method or the code block you call it in? –  turbo Dec 6 '13 at 20:37
1  
Take the time to put together a SSCCE - as is, there is no way we can help you, because the code you've provided is incomplete. If you put together a short example of the behavior you're seeing that we can run, we can explain why. As an added bonus, just putting together an SSCCE is a great debugging tool, and often helps uncover your bug yourself. –  dimo414 Dec 6 '13 at 20:43
    
There is something you are not showing that is causing it not to work. since the code at is stands (assuming you call materialEquals() ) should return 20 when you call getMatInt() and it does when compiled here. –  Doon Dec 6 '13 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try:

public int getMatInt()
{
     materialEquals();
     return matInt;
}

There is no reason for this in your constructor: str = new String(pStr);, just use str = pStr.

In fact, you might be better off setting matInt in your constructor:

public test(String pStr)
{
     str = pStr;
     materialEquals();
}

And depending on how many materials you have, you might want to look into using enumeration.

Ok after your edits:

 public int getBonus()
{
 calcBonus(); //bonus won't be calculated otherwise
 return bonus;
}

After further edits:

Your constructor is wrong, you're not initializing int magic. Try this constructor instead.

public test(int pMagic, String pStr)
{
  this.magic = pMagic; //int magic = pMagic was a new variable only in the constructor scope
  this.str = pStr;
  calcBonus();
 }

Also you might as well calculate the bonus on construction.

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I forgot to add the method again, sorry. Updated my code, it still doesnt work for me. –  user3075910 Dec 6 '13 at 20:50
    
That works, thanks. I wasn't getting a NPE bizarrely. –  user3075910 Dec 6 '13 at 20:58
    
actually that make senses, an int can't be null, it defaults to 0. –  turbo Dec 6 '13 at 21:04

You will need to call materialEquals() so that 20 can be assigned to matInt upon equals comparison, as integers are always initialized to default value 0 upon declaration.

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