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I am using python 2.6

class Father(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.is_rich = 'yes'
        self.single  = 'yes'

class Son(Father):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.has_job = 'yes'

son = Son()
print dir(son)  --> Does not display Father class attributes is_rich & single? 

Why?

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3  
Since when did being "single" become a heritable trait? ;-) – Raymond Hettinger Dec 6 '13 at 20:54
    
@RaymondHettinger His wife died and now he is single. Just wanted to use a funny example. – NullException Dec 6 '13 at 20:58
3  
@RaymondHettinger -- Amoebas seem to manage it. :) – mgilson Dec 6 '13 at 20:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You didn't call Father.__init__. You need to do so explicitly or use super1,2:

class Son(Father):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        Father.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
        self.has_job = 'yes'

1super considered Super!
2super considered harmful

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Looks like you didn't have your child chain the initialization up towards its parent.

Perhaps reading this will help: Why aren't Python's superclass __init__ methods automatically invoked?

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For what it's worth, by the way, I'd recommend that you normally start your init suite by calling each of your parent constructors, left to right (same order as you'd be reading them, given that the language uses English reserved and keywords. If you have need to perform initialization in some other order, or to skip initialization of any parent classes then you should DEFINITELY document your justification for that. – Jim Dennis Dec 7 '13 at 5:19

You need to call base class's __init__, as python only invokes the first __init__ method found in the class hierarchy the __init__ in Father is never invoked. You can do that using super or using Father.__init__ as shown in @mgilson's answer.

class Son(Father):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(Son, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.has_job = 'yes'

Demo:

>>> s = Son()
>>> s.is_rich
'yes'
>>> s.single
'yes'
>>> s.has_job
'yes'
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