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I am using R to summarize a large amount of data for a report. I want to be able to use lapply() to generate a list of tables from the table() function, from which I can extract my desired statistics. There are a lot of these, so I've written a function to do it. My issue is that I am having difficulty returning the number of missing (NA) values even though I have that in each table, because I can't figure out how to tell R that I want the element from table() that holds the number of NA values. As far as I can tell, R is "naming" that element NA...and I can't call that.

I'm trying to avoid writing some complex statement where I say something like which(is.na(names(element[1]))) | names(element[1])=="var_I_want" because I feel like that's just really wordy. I was hoping there was some way to either tell R to label the NA variable in each table with a character name, or to tell it to pick the one labeled NA, but I haven't had much luck yet.

Minimal example:

example <- data.frame(ID=c(10,20,30,40,50),
                      V1=c("A","B","A",NA,"C"),
                      V2=c("Dog","Cat",NA,"Cat","Bunny"),
                      V3=c("Yes","No","No","Yes","No"),
                      V4=c("No",NA,"No","No","Yes"),
                      V5=c("No","Yes","Yes",NA,"No"))

varlist <- c("V1","V2","V3","V4","V5")

list_o_tables <- lapply(X=example[varlist],FUN=table,useNA="always")

list(V1=list_o_tables[["V1"]]["A"],
     V2=list_o_tables[["V2"]]["Cat"],
     V3=list_o_tables[["V3"]]["Yes"],
     V4=list_o_tables[["V4"]]["Yes"],
     V5=list_o_tables[["V5"]]["Yes"])

What I get:

$V1
A 
2 

$V2
Cat 
  2 

$V3
Yes 
  2 

$V4
Yes 
  1 

$V5
Yes 
  2

What I'd like:

$V1
A     <NA>
2       1

$V2
Cat   <NA>
  2     1

$V3
Yes   <NA> 
  2     0

$V4
Yes   <NA> 
  1     1

$V5
Yes   <NA> 
  2     1
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is ugly (IMHO) but it works:

my_table <- function(x){
    setNames(table(x,useNA = "always"),c(sort(unique(x[!is.na(x)])),'NA'))
}

So you'd lapply this instead, and then you'd have access to the NA column.

Looking more closely, this is rooted in the behavior of factor:

levels(factor(c(1,NA,2),exclude = NULL))
[1] "1" "2" NA 

My recollection is that the distinction between a factor level of NA versus "NA" has been at the very least a source of confusion in R in the past. I feel like I've seen some debates about the merits of this on r-devel, but I can't recall for sure at the moment.

So the issue is, if you have a factor with NA values, what do you call the levels? Technically, this is correct, one of the levels is "missing" not literally "NA". It would be nice (IMHO) if table didn't adhere to this quite so strictly, though.

share|improve this answer
    
I figured something like this would work, but I also thought I was missing some obvious R feature that would do this. I agree it's not pretty, but it does get the job done. – TARehman Dec 6 '13 at 22:52
    
@TARehman It really seems like the name of the NA category should be set to the character <NA> rather than literally being NA. I can't even really think of a reason why the way it is would be useful... – joran Dec 6 '13 at 22:54
    
Agreed. I went at it for about an hour before coming to SO to ask because I was like "This can't possibly be the intended functionality..." :P – TARehman Dec 6 '13 at 22:55
    
Looking at the way table treats NA something like lapply( list_o_tables , tail , 1 ) could be useful.... – Simon O'Hanlon Dec 6 '13 at 23:08

tab[match(NA, names(tab))] seems to work where tab[NA], tab[NA_character_], tab["NA_character_"], tab["<NA>"], etc. etc. fail...

f <- function(nms, obj) {
    obj[sapply(c(nms, NA), function(X) match(X, names(obj)))]
}

f("Cat", list_o_tables[["V2"]])
#  Cat <NA> 
#    2    1 

mapply(f, list("A", "Cat", "Yes", "Yes", "Yes"), list_o_tables, SIMPLIFY=FALSE)
# [[1]]
# 
#    A <NA> 
#    2    1 
# 
# [[2]]
# 
#  Cat <NA> 
#    2    1 
# 
# [[3]]
# 
#  Yes <NA> 
#    2    0 
# 
# [[4]]
# 
#  Yes <NA> 
#    1    1 
# 
# [[5]]
# 
#  Yes <NA> 
#    2    1 
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's what I thought at first, too! ;) – joran Dec 6 '13 at 22:45
    
Right - note how your <NA> columns contain NA. It's quite annoying. :D – TARehman Dec 6 '13 at 22:45
    
Thanks @joran & TARehman. Edited to fix. This sure is a weird corner case, isn't it? – Josh O'Brien Dec 6 '13 at 23:09

When you set useNA="always", table() always adds NA as the last result, therefore one way to do this would be to use tail to your advantage. Assuming we have your list from above (which I'll call l1)...

l1 <- list(V1=list_o_tables[["V1"]]["A"],
     V2=list_o_tables[["V2"]]["Cat"],
     V3=list_o_tables[["V3"]]["Yes"],
     V4=list_o_tables[["V4"]]["Yes"],
     V5=list_o_tables[["V5"]]["Yes"])

We can get the NA and then join them like this..

l2 <- lapply( list_o_tables , tail , 1 )
mapply( c , l1, l2 , SIMPLIFY = FALSE )
#$V1
#   A <NA> 
#   2    1 

#$V2
# Cat <NA> 
#   2    1 

#$V3
# Yes <NA> 
#   2    0 

#$V4
# Yes <NA> 
#   1    1 

#$V5
# Yes <NA> 
#   2    1 
share|improve this answer

Why not just fix the names up after the fact?

tables <- lapply(example[-1], table, useNA = "ifany")

fix_names <- function(x) {
  names(x)[is.na(names(x))] <- "<NA>"
  x
}
lapply(tables, fix_names)
share|improve this answer

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