Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen quite a few questions about whether or not it's possible to specify a default type if one isn't specified. The answer to that appears to be no. My question is, if your class header expects a type parameter, and you simply don't pass it one, what does it default to? Object? Take a simple Linked Node implementation of a Queue (abbreviated):

public class ListQueue<T> implements Queue<T>
{
   private Node<T> first;
   private Node<T> last;

   public void enqueue(T item)
   {
      Node<T> x = new Node<T>(item);
      if (isEmpty())
      {
         first = x;
         last = x;
      }
      else
      {
         last.next = x;
         last = x;
      }
   }

   public T dequeue()
   {
      if (isEmpty())
      {
         throw new IllegalStateException("Queue is empty");
      }
      T item = first.data;
      first = first.next;
      if (isEmpty())
      {
         last = null;
      }
      return item;
   }
}

public class Node<T>
{
   public T data;
   public Node<T> next;

   public Node(T data)
   {
      this(data, null);
   }

   public Node(T data, Node<T> n)
   {
      this.data = data;
      next = n;
   }
}

Then in my test driver, I am seemingly able to enqueue/dequeue any type of data:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
   ListQueue myQueue = new ListQueue();  // key point: no type specified

   myQueue.enqueue("test");
   myQueue.enqueue(2);
   myQueue.enqueue(new Date());

   System.out.println(myQueue.dequeue()); // prints "test"

   int result = 2 + (Integer)myQueue.dequeue();
   System.out.println(result); // prints 4

   Date now = (Date)myQueue.dequeue();
   System.out.println(now); // prints current date
}

Of course I have to cast everything which defeats the purpose of generics, but is it really defaulting my data items to Objects to allow them all onto the queue? That's the only explanation I can think of, but I'd like to confirm that since I can't find it concretely written out that that's the case.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, if you don't specify a type, it defaults to Object. But you should avoid using raw types and should use Generics as much as possible, because Generics provide tighter type checks at compile time.

You must know that this generic type is preserved only until runtime, e.g. at runtime the JVM understands the generic type are erased and this process is called Type Erasure.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 and note that it defaults to its upper bound, which in this case is Object. So with public class ListQueue<T extends Number> it would default to Number. –  Paul Bellora Dec 7 '13 at 7:25

This was the way java 1.4 used to work. Generics was introduced as a part of java 1.5 so that we have better control over what we put into Collections and what we retrieve. This was done to minimise errors that could crop up during runtime.

To answer your question, it does default to object. Actually, it was always objects (atleast at runtime). The generics stuff that you use is only a safety net for us during compile time. Once the java class is compiled into byte code, all of the generics stuff is erased by the compiler. So your runtime code will look just like you never used generics at all.

share|improve this answer

It does not "default" to anything. A raw type is different from any parameterized type.

ListQueue is not the same as ListQueue<Object>. Example:

ListQueue<String> foo;
ListQueue myQueue = foo; // compiles
ListQueue<Object> myQueue2 = foo; // doesn't compile

However, in terms of the parameter and return types of the methods of a raw type, they all become non-generic and T is reduced to the upper bound.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.