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Okay, first of all a description of my problem. I have a sample program, only one file. The only included headers are part of the standard library. For training and testing I wrote my own malloc wrapper which automatically writes 0 to the entire storage block. On my Netbook (Debian + Gnome Desktop, raw gcc call like this: gcc memstest.c -o memstest) it runs without problems. The check for any other data then 0 is successful, even though I removed the entire iterative check for each part of the storage due to benchmarking. When trying this on Windows with Code::Blocks as IDE and GNU gcc compiler configured, it tells me that there is data within the allocated storage (most times a value of -60). As seen, I'm mostly only using unsigned values, therefore it shouldn't be possible that this value is a failure of mine when writing it to the data block. I guess it's the memcpy functions, since it's the only routine that touches this data block. If I'm mistaken, I will change the topic title.

Here'a my sample Program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <iso646.h>
#include <time.h>

void *Smalloc_dyn( unsigned int n_bytes );

int main( void )
{
    time_t start_t, end_t;
    double difference;
    unsigned int index = 0;
    start_t = time( NULL );
    for( index = 0; index < 10000000; index++ )
    {
        char *test = Smalloc_dyn( 65536 );
        if( *test != 0 )
        {
            printf( "Found data without 0 overwriting...\n" );
            return 0;
        }
        free( test );
    }
    end_t = time( NULL );
    difference = difftime( end_t, start_t );
    printf( "Smalloc_dyn took %.1fs\n", difference );
    start_t = time( NULL );
    for( index = 0; index < 10000000; index++ )
    {
        char *test = calloc( ( 65535 / sizeof( (long) 0 ) ), ( 65536 / ( 65535 / sizeof( (long) 0 ) ) ) );
        if( *test != 0 )
        {
            printf( "Found data without 0 overwrting...(2)\n" );
            return 0;
        }
        free( test );
    }
    end_t = time( NULL );
    difference = difftime( end_t, start_t );
    printf( "calloc took %.1fs\n", difference );
    return 0;
}

void *Smalloc_dyn( unsigned int n_bytes )
{
    /*
    This fusion of malloc and a modified memset
    is way faster than calling malloc() and
    after that memset( *dst, 0, len(dst) ).
    We are defining 0 as a long and will
    therefore copy ( for example ) 8 Bytes
    instead of a per-byte copying.
    With a memory need of 1024, we only
    have 128 steps instead of 1024.
    */
    if( 0 == n_bytes )
    {
        return NULL;
    }
    long unsigned int chr = 0;
    unsigned int steps = sizeof( chr ) / n_bytes;
    unsigned int asteps = n_bytes % sizeof( chr );
    unsigned int index = 0;
    char *mem_ptr = malloc( n_bytes );
    if( NULL == mem_ptr )
    {
        return mem_ptr;
    }
    char *write_ptr = mem_ptr;
    for( index = 0; index < steps; index++ )
    {
        memcpy( write_ptr, &chr, sizeof( chr ) );
        write_ptr = write_ptr + sizeof( chr );
    }
    for( index = 0; index < asteps; index++ )
    {
        memcpy( write_ptr, &chr, 1 );
        write_ptr = write_ptr + 1;
    }
    return mem_ptr;
}

Edit: Corrected Code

share|improve this question
    
So you realize sizeof(chr)/n_bytes is going to be zero, right? Integer 4/65536 is 0. Also asteps is 0 as well, as 65536 % 4 is 0. So you're never calling memset at all. Perhaps that's why it's "way faster" :) –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Dec 7 '13 at 2:26
    
Thats again one of that examples of 'Can't see the forest due to to much trees'. I was looking for an value error of some sort. Okay, again a nice lesson to reread own code more then just 2 times :) –  fairiestoy Dec 7 '13 at 2:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why is the value of steps evaluated as

unsigned int steps = sizeof( chr ) / n_bytes;

and not as

unsigned int steps = n_bytes / sizeof( chr );

?

This looks like a potential source for the problem, since most of the allocated block will be left uninitialized due to this error. In "most" cases steps will end up being zero (like in your test case with nbytes being 65536). Unintialized data can easily "behave" differently between platforms.

share|improve this answer
    
In this test program, both steps and asteps are 0, so memset isn't called even once. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Dec 7 '13 at 2:27
    
Oh my ... Okay thanks guys. So just a type of mine. I will delete this topic after a while to keep this clean. Thanks a lot. –  fairiestoy Dec 7 '13 at 2:30
1  
@fairiestoy: Deleting the question takes away the points awarded to AndreyT for the upvote and accept. Just leave the question as it is; if others decide it's not useful, they might vote to close and/or delete it. –  Keith Thompson Dec 7 '13 at 2:39

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