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<script>
var tids = {
308: 1,
312: 1,
313: 1,
314: 1
};
</script>

results in "missing } in XML expression with an arrow pointing to the first colon in the JS error console. Isn't this a valid declaration?

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1  
Do you have any other JS code or is this it? This by itself on a page works just fine without any errors. –  Marek Karbarz Jan 11 '10 at 18:06
    
Have you tried declaring your script tag's type: <script type='text/javascript' language='javascript'>? Might help if your browser is confused for some reason... –  Topher Fangio Jan 11 '10 at 18:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First you should fix your <script> tag to

<script type="text/javascript">

Next, if you want to use numeric indexes, try to declare them as a string:

var tids = {
'308': 1,
'312': 1,
'313': 1,
'314': 1
};

Please note, however, that you will not be able to reference them in object notation (i.e. tids.308). You could simply use arrays instead of objects:

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1  
You could access it as tids['308'], though. –  Rudi Jan 11 '10 at 18:21
    
it was the type that was causing it. –  user105033 Jan 11 '10 at 18:28
    
@cballout Good eye man! –  Doug Neiner Jan 11 '10 at 18:32
    
Crockford says to not worry about the type attribute in your script tags. The OP's script tag is fine. javascript.crockford.com/script.html –  Lance Fisher Jul 14 '11 at 18:38
    
Specifically, the script tag type defaults to text/javascript as part of HTML5. One might want to use the old tag for compatibility with older browsers. Or just decide they don't matter. –  Charles Merriam Jan 19 '13 at 7:19

This isn't an associative array -- it's just a JS object. I believe you need to make the keys strings instead of numeric.

var tids = {
"308": 1,
"312": 1,
"313": 1,
"314": 1
};

More info on associative arrays vs. regular objects.

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i guess that the key cannot start with a number. try;

<script>
var tids = {
n308: 1,
n312: 1,
n313: 1,
n314: 1
};
</script>
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1  
A key can start with a number. –  Doug Neiner Jan 11 '10 at 18:09
1  
I'm pretty sure the key can be a number, I think I've used it before. –  Topher Fangio Jan 11 '10 at 18:09
    
I guess not. The key cannot start with a number at least it be declared like a string (in that case is not a number anymore) –  returnvoid Jan 12 '10 at 16:10

I have tried in both IE and FF and the code is fine. It should be the error of other codes.

Please use Firefox Web Developer and Firebug to find the source of error.

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