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bool "bar" is by default true, but it should be false, it can not be initiliazied in the constructor. is there a way to init it as false without making it static?

Simplified version of the code:

foo.h

class Foo{
 public:
     void Foo();
private:
     bool bar;
}

foo.c

Foo::Foo()
{  
   if(bar)
   {
     doSomethink();
   }
}
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9  
Why can't you initialize it in the constructor? –  Kena Jan 11 '10 at 18:14
    
because the constructor can be called more than one time, I may not change that routine because that would lack a bigger peace of software:( –  Christoferw Jan 11 '10 at 18:16
27  
How would the constructor ever be called more than once? –  jalf Jan 11 '10 at 18:17
2  
From the code, it looks like it might be a persistent variable which controls how the objects are constructed - in which case it needs to be static. As it is, it's not initialised at all, so it could have either value. –  Mike Seymour Jan 11 '10 at 18:18
2  
I think you need to tell us more about what you're really trying to accomplish for anybody to give really sensible advice about this. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 11 '10 at 18:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 46 down vote accepted

In fact, by default it's not initialized at all. The value you see is simply some trash values in the memory that have been used for allocation.

If you want to set a default value, you'll have to ask for it in the constructor :

class Foo{
 public:
     Foo() : bar() {} // default bool value == false 
     // OR to be clear:
     Foo() : bar( false ) {} 

     void foo();
private:
     bool bar;
}

UPDATE C++11:

If you can use a C++11 compiler, you can now default construct instead (most of the time):

class Foo{
 public:
     // The constructor will be generated automatically, except if you need to write it yourself.
     void foo();
private:
     bool bar = false; // Always false by default at construction, except if you change it manually in a constructor's initializer list.
}
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7  
and therefore you have a almost 100% chance of if (bar) being true. –  Adam Woś Jan 11 '10 at 18:15
2  
some compilers will initialize the memory in debug builds to a specific pattern. If using one of those compilers, debug builds WILL have 100% chance of bar being true. –  sean e Jan 11 '10 at 18:20
4  
@Adam: The language does not mandate any specific physical representation of false and true, which means that in theory an implementation can use, say, physical 1 for true and all other physical patterns for false. On such an implementation an unitialized bool object will amost always be false. –  AndreyT Jan 11 '10 at 18:38
4  
What are you (other commenters) talking about ? Both constructors from Klaim's code are correct. (I suspect you are unaware of the zero-initialization done in the first constructor -> see n3000 §8.5/5 /7 and /10) –  Luc Hermitte Jan 11 '10 at 18:52
4  
@UncleBens: yes, in a footnote the standard says, "Using a bool value in ways described by this International Standard as ‘undefined,’ such as by examining the value of an uninitialized automatic variable, might cause it to behave as if it is neither true nor false". As always, undefined behavior means all bets are off... –  Michael Burr Jan 11 '10 at 22:05

Klaim's answer is spot on. To "solve" your problem you could use a constructor initialization list. I strongly suggest you read that page as it may clear up some similar queries you may have in future.

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This program has undefined behavior. Intrinsic types do not have constructors. You could do bool bar = bool(); but it's better to define the actual value in your foo class.

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C / C++ don't initialize variables for you at all. The memory location which is now in use by bar had a value in it which is interpreted as "true". This will not always be the case. You must initialize it in your constructor.

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It depends. POD member variables aren't initialized, but non-POD members get default constructed. And, of course, global/static variables are initialized. –  jamesdlin Jan 11 '10 at 19:38

Since you're using the value of bar in the ctor, I assume you're trying to set it before the object is created? I think you meant to make it a static class variable instead of an instance variable.

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Try this:

class Foo
{ 
  public: 
    void Foo(); 
  private: 
     bool bar; 
} 

Foo::Foo() : bar(false)
{
  if(bar) 
  { 
    doSomething(); 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
foo() is not Foo() ... –  Klaim Jan 11 '10 at 18:17
    
Oops, @Klaim beat me to providing an example. –  Bill Jan 11 '10 at 18:18
    
foo() is a typo, foo() should be Foo() –  Christoferw Jan 11 '10 at 18:24
    
I updated the answer, hope this wasn't too rude of me. –  nbolton Jan 11 '10 at 18:26
    
After OP updated question, foo() no longer exists, so I reverted, @Nick. Thanks though. –  Bill Jan 11 '10 at 19:03

You can initialize any variable when you declare it.

bool bar = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
i thougt that same, but i get an C2864 error then: only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class –  Christoferw Jan 11 '10 at 18:18
1  
This is true for local variables, but not class members. –  Bill Jan 11 '10 at 18:20
2  
But not before C++0x… –  Debilski Jan 11 '10 at 18:29
    
0 is an integer literal. false is a boolean literal. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jun 13 at 13:54

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