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I'm trying to modify the behavior of some web parts in Sharepoint (thus forcing IE down my throat) for our users who use the Project server pages. I'm not really the best JavaScript guy, and this is driving me nuts.

On one webpart to display the work from Project, there is a subrow 'Planned' shown below the actual data entry row that clutters the view. We want to turn the 'Planned' row off.

I can do it with a simple three liner like this:

<style type="text/css">
   .XmlGridPlannedWork {display:none;}
</style>

But the users want to toggle the lines on and off. So I thought I'd try reading then writting the current CSS value like so:

<script type="text/javascript">

function toggle_PlannedLine()
var ObjPlanned = Document.getElementById("tr").getElementsByTagName("XmlGridPlannedWork");

for(var i=0;i<ObjPlanned.length;i++)
{
    if (OjbPlanned[i].display != "none")
    {
        // toggle the 'Planned' line off
        ObjPlanned[i].style.display = "none";
    }
    else
    {
        // toggle the 'Planned' line on
        ObjPlanned[i].style.display = "inline";
    }
}

return;
}

</script>

<button onClick="toggle_PlannedLine();">Toggle Planned Line</button>

The actual segment I'm targeting looks like this:

<tr class="XmlGridPlannedWork" RowID="694810f9-e922-4321-9236-e495dd5048d9B" ID="GridDataRow">

Of course, when you click the button, the rows don't disappear. At this point, I'm pretty sure I'm missing something obvious, but like I mentioned, I'm no JavaScript guru.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Easiest Solution

Ok, so my answer below should help you out, but here is another way to approach it that is much simpler:

CSS

<style type="text/css">
   .XmlGridPlannedWork {display:none;}
   body.showPlanned .XmlGridPlannedWork { display: block}
</style>

HTML/JavaScript

<script type="text/javascript">
function toggle_PlannedLine() {
    if(document.body.className.match(/\bshowPlanned\b/) > -1)
        document.body.className = document.body.className.replace(/\bshowPlanned\b/,'');
    else
        document.body.className += " showPlanned";
}
</script>

<button onClick="toggle_PlannedLine();">Toggle Planned Line</button>

Original Answer

You were really close in the concepts you wanted, but as the other answers point out a number of things were missing. I rewrote your function to work cross browser, and please ask if you have any questions about it:

<script type="text/javascript">

function toggle_PlannedLine() {
  var objs = [];

  if( document.querySelector){
     objs = document.querySelectorAll('tr.XmlGridPlannedWork');
  } else if (document.getElementsByClassName) {
     objs = document.getElementsByClassName('XmlGridPlannedWork');
  } else {
     var temp = document.getElementsByTagName('tr');
     for(var j = 0; j < temp.length; j++){
       if(temp[j].className.match(/\bXmlGridPlannedWork\b/) > -1){
         objs.push(temp[j]);
       }
     }
  }

  for(var i=0;i<objs.length;i++)
  {
      if (objs[i].style.display != "none")
      {
          // toggle the 'Planned' line off
          objs[i].style.display = "none";
      }
      else
      {
          // toggle the 'Planned' line on
          objs[i].style.display = "inline";
      }
  }
}

</script>

<button onClick="toggle_PlannedLine();">Toggle Planned Line</button>

For those arguing that jQuery is not a valid answer, please take the following code as an example of why jQuery is so easy to use. All of the previous code is summed up like this:

<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
  $(function(){
    $('button.toggle').click(function(){
      $("tr.XmlGridPlannedWork").toggle();
    })
  })
</script>

<button class="toggle">Toggle Planned Line</button>
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for not suggesting jQuery Doug ;) –  Justin Johnson Jan 11 '10 at 18:44
    
LOL... I did mention it at the end, but only after providing the pure version first :) –  Doug Neiner Jan 11 '10 at 18:48
2  
+1 - Just one small point - a <tr> element may have more than one CSS class, so may want to use a regex to test whether the className attribute contains a particular CSS class. –  Russ Cam Jan 11 '10 at 18:55
    
Thanks for not just suggesting jQuery. While I agree that it's easier to write simple things like this when you're back by any library, my issue with people just suggesting jQuery to the OP is that he is clearly not familiar with the language. Throwing a library at him may help with this task, but it's not going to help him in the long run & will just lead to more misunderstood code written with jQuery. And while it's likely to be cached if included from Google's CDN, there is still a lot more code that goes into your jQuery example that's just not seen. At any rate I appreciate your answer. –  Justin Johnson Jan 11 '10 at 18:58
1  
@Doug, Agree with Russ, you need a RegExp to check the className (the indexOf edit IMHO is not enough, imagine a class named BarXmlGridPlannedWorkFoo, the indexOf check will wrongly return true), and you have a small typo in that if also, you refer to obj instead of objs. And finally when you use the document.getElementsByClassName method, you should pass only the name of the class (without the dot). Good work +1 –  CMS Jan 11 '10 at 19:02

You forgot the opening brace for your function.

You are using getElementByTagName incorrectly. This function gets elements that match based on tag name (a, img, etc.) not CSS class. You can use jquery to accomplish what you want, or you can enumerate through every element on the page until you find the one you want. There are some open-source implementations of this available online. Your best bet, though, would be to add an id to the tag you care about, and then use getElementById.

Finally, Document should be document, and JavaScript is case sensitive.

Hope this helps!

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document.getElementsByTagName looks for elements based on the name of their HTML tag, not their class attribute. Newer (not IE) browsers have support for document.getElementsByClassName(), and there are open source functions that do the same thing, falling back on the browser-native versions where available. This function will return a NodeList containing all the elements that use that class, and you can access each element and hide it through that list.

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The OP states he's stuck using IE. –  David Pfeffer Jan 11 '10 at 18:39
    
@bytenik He's still right about his first comment; which is the OP's main problem aside from your note on syntax. –  Justin Johnson Jan 11 '10 at 18:42
    
Sure, that's why I mentioned that there are homegrown versions which can bring the convenience of that function to older browsers that don't support it and benefit from the speed of the ones that do. It's not something you can only take advantage of if your target audience is using a newer, non-IE browser. –  Andrew Noyes Jan 16 '10 at 23:37

First, document should be lowercase in your var ObjPlanned declaration. Second, getElementById returns an element based on a unique ID and you're passing it the element, or tag, name. getElementsByTagName returns an array of elements matching a certain tag but you're passing it a className. There is no 'getElementsByClassName' built in to JavaScript, but you can easily use Google to find a solution.

share|improve this answer
1  
documents.getElementsByClassName does natively exist in JavaScript, just not in IE –  Justin Johnson Jan 11 '10 at 18:43
    
Thanks for the correction. I'd completely forgotten the 'good' browsers added native support a couple of years ago. –  Ryan Joy Jan 11 '10 at 18:58
    
document.getElementsByClassName is part of the HTML 5 DOM but not any other standard. For the record. –  Benry Jan 11 '10 at 19:04

Use jQuery. It provides a very useful $.css() method, which does what you're looking for in a very simple fashion.

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2  
Stop giving pure javscript answers using JQuery. Use JQuery is not a solution. –  Zaje Jan 11 '10 at 18:34
1  
I disagree with our comment Zaje. For one the OP claims they are not very proficient in Javascript. Because of this, using jquery may be the best/easiest solution. If the user is not interested (because they already know about jquery) then I would assume they would ask for a pure javascript solution. If they do not know about it (or any other js library) then I think they are valid solutions. –  sberry Jan 11 '10 at 18:36
    
Agree with Zaje on this. JQuery is not the end all, be all to every JavaScript question. Saying "use JQuery" is as useful as saying "don't use SharePoint." –  Benry Jan 11 '10 at 18:40
    
Agree with Benry and Zaje. People really need to rely on JavaScript natively a lot of the time. You can't just tell people who are making a simple web page change to add a huge library to their page. –  David Pfeffer Jan 11 '10 at 18:41
    
sberry the guy has given you the entire code, why dont you just point out the mistakes in his code rather than telling him to use JQuery. They arent proficient with javascript, why tell them to include more javscript files ? wont it increase their troubles , as to which files to include and which to not, which file does wat etc.?? –  Zaje Jan 11 '10 at 18:42

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