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I need to append the arrays created in each loop so that I get a single ndarray at the end. The code structure is like this:

for...:
      .
      .
      .
     for...:
         list1 = array([some_math_here])
         list2.append(list1)

     #each loop creats a list, converting it to array() gives different shaped arrays:
     array(list2).shape
     (2939, 4)
     (2942, 4)
     (2027, 4)
     (2030, 4)

     #list3 collects all the generated results
     list3.append(list2)

Q: How can I have an array instead of list3, with n*4 columns and different number of rows?

I tried by creating an empty array a = array([0.,1.]) and then append(a,array(list_2)) but doesn't work. I'm aware of hstack vstack etc, but cannot make use of them together with append in the loop. Any advice how?

UPDATE Here's the actual code with output from suggested methods:

files_ = glob.glob('D:\Test files\*.txt')
tfile_ = loadtxt('times.txt')    
averages_, d = [], []

with open ('outfile.csv', 'wb') as outfile:
    writer = csv.writer(outfile)

    for fcount_, fname_ in enumerate(files_):   
        data = loadtxt(fname_ , usecols = (1,2,3,4))    
        average_, fcol = [], []
        seg_len = 3

        for x in range(0, len(data[:,0]), seg_len):
            sample_means = [mean(data[x:x+seg_len,i]) for i in range(4)]
            none_zeros = [x if x >= 0 else x == 0 for x in sample_means]            
            average_.append(none_zeros)

        fcol = cumsum(array(average_)[:,0])
        average_ = array([row + [col] for row, col in zip(average_, fcol)])
        averages_.append(average_)
    d = concatenate(array(averages_))    
    df = pd.DataFrame(d)
    df.to_csv('pdtest2.csv')

output:

           0         1         2         3         4
0   0.037039  0.103792  0.136116  0.579297  0.037039
1   0.051183  0.104669  0.177728  0.593771  0.088222
2   0.059517  0.105437  0.174274  0.571402  0.147739
3   0.053212  0.102476  0.167530  0.645745  0.200950
4   0.054637  0.104450  0.165228  0.596622  0.054637
5   0.051622  0.101161  0.166708  0.595964  0.106259
6   0.057324  0.099077  0.168024  0.596841  0.163583
7   0.054692  0.103573  0.157168  0.598596  0.218275
8   0.066699  0.100612  0.145984  0.591578  0.284974
9   0.120866  5.527104  4.678589  2.401020  0.120866
10  0.113958  5.176220  4.669872  2.361985  0.234824
11  0.121469  4.879613  4.659017  2.359573  0.356293
12  0.122511  4.695618  4.642240  2.363959  0.478803
13  0.126650  4.621933  4.620447  2.347073  0.605453
14  0.132708  4.676868  4.517568  2.364617  0.132708
15  0.125087  4.693535  4.459672  2.381941  0.257795
16  0.132708  4.715246  4.444705  2.334353  0.390503
17  0.133476  4.745619  4.406300  2.317467  0.523979

while I want :

    0           1           2           3           4           5           6           7           8           9           10          11          12          13          14          15          16          17          18          19
0   0.037038522 0.103792144 0.136115724 0.57929719  0.037038522 0.054637318 0.104450043 0.16522775  0.596621864 0.054637318 0.12086581  5.527104488 4.678589189 2.401020431 0.12086581  0.132707991 4.67686799  4.517567512 2.364616645 0.132707991
1   0.051183348 0.104669343 0.177727829 0.593770968 0.08822187  0.051621948 0.101160549 0.166708023 0.595963965 0.106259265 0.113957871 5.176219782 4.669871979 2.361985046 0.234823681 0.125087328 4.693534961 4.459672089 2.381941338 0.257795319
2   0.059516735 0.105436892 0.17427386  0.571402402 0.147738605 0.057323738 0.099077202 0.168023821 0.596841163 0.163583003 0.121468884 4.879613015 4.659016582 2.359572747 0.356292565 0.132707991 4.715245885 4.444704808 2.334353258 0.39050331
3   0.05321187  0.102476346 0.167530397 0.645744989 0.200950475 0.054692143 0.103572845 0.157168489 0.598595561 0.218275146 0.122510557 4.695618334 4.642240062 2.363958746 0.478803122 0.13347554  4.745619253 4.406299754 2.317467166 0.52397885
4   0           0           0           0           0           0.066698797 0.1006123   0.145984208 0.591577971 0.284973943 0.126649838 4.621932787 4.620447035 2.347072653 0.60545296  0           0            0          0           0
share|improve this question
    
Is this a valid Python syntax? –  Andy Dec 7 '13 at 10:27
    
You can't quite get what you're looking for, and what you're looking for probably isn't quite what you want. What do all these something-by-4 arrays represent? Are you sure you don't want to stack these vertically instead of horizontally? And do you really need the for loop, or can you use vectorized operations to produce cleaner, faster code without it? –  user2357112 Dec 7 '13 at 10:30
    
@user2357112, 'stack vertically' is what I want, and I think when each array has 4 columns, and I said one array with n*4 columns, I meant that, yes? I have been using Python for only 2 weeks now, and surely my code is not he most efficient one, but as it takes several txt files does some math on columns of each, I have the loops. –  PyLearner Dec 7 '13 at 11:18
2  
As @CT says, you cannot have a non-uniformly shaped array. To get around this, you can pad the end of the shorter arrays with np.nan or 0 or use a masked array. The method by which to stack though would be to append your arrays to a list through your loop, then call np.column_stack or np.hstack on your list at the end of the loops, don't np.append to the arrays within the loops. –  askewchan Dec 7 '13 at 16:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, you can't create a n*4 2d array if n for each column is different:

>>> np.vstack((np.arange(10),np.arange(1,11),np.arange(2,12)))
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9],
       [ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10],
       [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11]])
>>> np.vstack((np.arange(10),np.arange(0,11),np.arange(0,12)))

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#36>", line 1, in <module>
    np.vstack((np.arange(10),np.arange(0,11),np.arange(0,12)))
  File "C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\numpy\core\shape_base.py", line 226, in vstack
    return _nx.concatenate(map(atleast_2d,tup),0)
ValueError: all the input array dimensions except for the concatenation axis must match exactly

See the ValueError, when the dimension of each array is different.

You either has to stay with list for list3 or fill each list2 to equal length.

For higher dimension, the same rule applies: np.vstack((np.ones((10,4)),np.ones((10,6)),np.ones((10,6)))) won't work, but np.vstack((np.ones((10,4)),np.ones((11,4)),np.ones((12,4)))) will and create a 35*4 array.

In your case, if you vstack your list2s, you will get get a 9938*4 array, if that is what you want. (I don't get the different number of rows part)

EDIT:

To pad the shorter arrays so that every array has the same shape, you need:np.lib.pad

>>> b=np.random.randint(0,20, size=(12,4))
>>> np.lib.pad(b, ((0,3),(0,0)), 'constant', constant_values=[0.])
array([[ 5,  2, 10,  7],
       [ 7, 17,  8, 11],
       [ 7,  7,  2, 10],
       [16, 17, 15, 16],
       [ 0, 19,  5,  6],
       [18, 19, 18,  6],
       [ 2,  8, 11, 19],
       [ 3, 17, 18, 16],
       [10,  1, 12, 11],
       [ 0,  7,  1, 14],
       [ 7, 17,  8, 16],
       [12,  6,  3,  5],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0]])

((0,3),(0,0)) means to pad 3 elements in the end of the first axis and pad 0 elements in the beginning of it. Also, it means to pad nothing in the 2nd axis. In your case you need to ((0,max_length-length_of_current_array),(0,0)).

Then you just stack them all up using np.hstack.

But in my opinion you may want to pad nan instead of 0.. 0. may be meaningful data value.

share|improve this answer
    
I think what @PyLearner wants is np.column_stack (or equivalently in their case, np.hstack) Your answer is correct in that it is impossible to have a uniform array given their inputs, but your example is the transpose of theirs. –  askewchan Dec 7 '13 at 15:49
    
@askewchan, yes, I suspected that is the case. But then I noticed OP's comment ''stack vertically' is what I want'. Anyway, the idea will be the same. Cheers! –  CT Zhu Dec 7 '13 at 16:15
    
haha, true. actually I've found the names of all the stack functions can be ambiguous if you don't already know what they do. e.g., vstack: stack in vertical direction, or stack vertical things? –  askewchan Dec 7 '13 at 16:19
    
Thanks guys for this. Seems like I git confused with vstack, hstack... What I meant was that the 4 columns created in each loop be stored next to the previous 4 columns. I think this means stacking horizontally rather than vertically! –  PyLearner Dec 8 '13 at 21:29
1  
en, that's move confusing..., if the arrays created in the loop have the shape of (2939, 4) (2942, 4) (2027, 4) and (2030, 4), the resulting array should have the shape of (9938, 4)? @askewchan, totally agree, it is quite confusing. As much headache R has given me, i think cbind(), rbind() is much more intuitive than vstack(), hstack() (and dstack() of course). –  CT Zhu Dec 8 '13 at 23:22

I think what you want is to make a plain Python list of NumPy arrays. Each array will have the same column count and types, but perhaps different numbers of rows. So you should start with simply list3 = [] and then do list3.append(arr) N times. Then at the end, if you want one big NumPy array with all the rows, just do np.concatenate(list3) to put them all together at once. This is more efficient than trying to concatenate NumPy arrays in the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you John for your help. –  PyLearner Dec 9 '13 at 5:30

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