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I'm trying to understand the concept of object streams, especially the combination of both. The usage I'm looking for is piping byte streams together with object streams like:

// StringifyStream reads Buffers and emits String Objects
// Mapper is really just a classical map
// BytifyStream reads String Objects and emits buffers.

process.stdin.pipe(
   StringifyStream()
).pipe( 
   Mapper(function(s) {
      return s.toUpperCase();
}).pipe(
    BytifyStream()
).pipe(process.stdout);

// This code should read from stdin, convert all incoming buffers to strings,
// map those strings to upper case and finally convert them back to buffers
// and write them to stdout.

Now, the documentation says:

"Setting objectMode mid-stream is not safe."

I dont really understand what this means. Is mixing byte/object streams not safe ?? I would really like to use this pattern but if its not safe, it probably a bad idea.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Object streams are those that emit data types other than Buffer or String.

Streams that are in object mode can emit generic JavaScript values other than Buffers and Strings.

Your example is safe, it just does the conversion Buffer -> string -> upper string -> Buffer.

This is only my opinion but you could simplify the chain and use only one Transform stream.

var util = require ("util");
var stream = require ("stream");

var UpperStream = function (){
    stream.Transform.call (this);
};

util.inherits (UpperStream, stream.Transform);

UpperStream.prototype._transform = function (chunk, encoding, cb){
    this.push ((chunk + "").toUpperCase ());
    cb ();
};

process.stdin.pipe (new UpperStream ()).pipe (process.stdout);
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