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Is there a way to print numbers from 1 to 100 without using any loops or conditions like "if"? We can easily do using recursion but that again has an if condition. Is there a way to do without using "if" as well? Also no repetitive print statements, or a single print statement containing all the numbers from 1 to 100.

A solution in Java is preferable.

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locked by Flexo Sep 3 '13 at 7:18

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closed as off-topic by Flexo Sep 3 '13 at 7:16

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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45 Answers

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Pseudo code. Uses an array to force an exception after 100 elements which is caught and does nothing.

function r(array a, int index){
    a[index] = a[index-1]+1
    print a[index]
    r(a, index+1)
}

try{
    array a;
    a.resize(101)
    r(a, 1)
}catch(OutOfBoundsException){
}

EDIT
Java code:

public void printTo100(){
    int[] array = new int[101];
    try{
        printToArrayLimit(array, 1);
    }catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){
    }
}
public void printToArrayLimit(int[] array, int index){
    array[index] = array[index-1]+1;
    System.out.println(array[index]);
    printToArrayLimit(array, index+1);
}
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2  
a.fill(101) is unecessary, just set a[index]=0 and print index. Of course, this still uses an 'if' statement internally in the JVM... –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 11 '10 at 19:01
7  
A recursive loop is still a loop... –  Jorn Jan 11 '10 at 23:04
9  
@Jorn no it isn't. They are two different things. –  Yacoby Jan 12 '10 at 18:05
7  
Does try/catch count as a conditional statement? It's like saying "if there was an exception..." –  Dan Burton Dec 31 '10 at 20:53
show 6 more comments

Know your libraries.

public class To100 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String set = new java.util.BitSet() {{ set(1, 100+1); }}.toString();
        System.out.append(set, 1, set.length()-1);
    }
}

(You can use String.replaceAll to change the separator. For instance, .replaceAll(", ", " ") for space separation.)

Explanation:

  • java.util.BitSet is a handy little class that represents an arbitrarily large (non-sparse) set of positive integers. (It does have so bad bits: not final, unnecessarily thread-safe, doesn't support building well, etc.)ta.
  • Extends BitSet allows me to write java.util only once. The JDK7 "diamond operator" should help reduce duplication with generic types, but no help for the more common situation. :(
  • The double braces are the Double Brace idiom - an anonymous inner class containing only an instance initialiser. It is a hack. It increase runtime size, and hence start-up time. Distribution size is negligible if you use pack200.gz. I think the modern world is ready for it. Your colleagues may not be. Perhaps start by using it for test da
  • BitSet.set sets a bit in the set (two completely different meanings of the word "set" there - I like it). It's a half-open range - the top value exclusive; the bottom inclusive. Add 1 to the top to include 100.
  • BitSet.toString is actually precisely defined by the API docs.
  • append was added to PrintStream with the introduction of the Appendable interface in J2SE 5.0. It essentially does a substring and prints the result. (A little secret: this isn't actually guaranteed by the spec to flush the output, but implementations always will.)
  • Starting the append at 1, and taking one off the length strips the braces from the string representation of BitSet.
  • "Know your libraries." Taken from Josh Bloch. See Java Puzzlers, puzzle 94. It really is good to know what is in the libraries. At least know where to look. Save your time, save maintenance time and get it right first time.
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5  
I'd like to upvote this a few more times because other than truppo's ridiculous answer, it is the only one that doesn't use a control structure. Yes, try/catch is a control structure. –  iandisme Jan 11 '10 at 19:21
1  
Can someone explain how does the above code work? –  Thunderhashy Jan 11 '10 at 22:04
1  
It's relying on BitSet's toString() to iterate though all 100 values. While this is clever answer, I think truppo's is more straighforward and understandable. –  Steve Kuo Jan 12 '10 at 0:21
19  
it's a clever solution, although I'd say using a library that uses loops and/or conditionals to do the job might not be in the spirit of the question –  Peter Becker Jan 12 '10 at 0:23
1  
@Hashsha: Much better, I'll give you the docs: java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/… java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/… –  OscarRyz Jan 12 '10 at 3:05
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DO NOT DO THIS UNDER ANY SANE CIRCUMSTANCES!

public class Fail {

    public void thisFails(int x){
        System.out.println(x);
        Integer[] bigArray = new Integer[9450];
        thisFails(x+1);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Fail failure = new Fail();
        failure.thisFails(1);
    }
}

When this is ran using 1m of heap space (java -Xmx1m Fail) it will run out of heap at the 100th recursion.

...

I will now go wash my hands.

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4  
Wow, congrats on figuring out exactly how much heap space this takes. –  Fraser Jan 11 '10 at 23:54
1  
This uses a loop. –  Noon Silk Jan 12 '10 at 0:11
2  
@silky: I see no loop, it is a recursive call. That is an awesome way IMO –  Guvante Jan 12 '10 at 0:54
11  
@silky, your reputation is high enough that you should know a loop and a recursive call are different things that can be used to achieve the same result. We can also achieve the same result using only universal logic gates (NAND/NOR) but it doesn't mean a bunch of NOR gates is a loop. –  z5h Jan 12 '10 at 5:23
2  
@silky re-read the question, he says recursion is allowed but unusable due to the stop condition which requires an if; besides - loops and recursions are not the same thing, they can just achieve the same thing in different manners –  laura Jan 12 '10 at 15:36
show 4 more comments

Is there a way to print numbers from 1 to 100 without using any loops or conditions like "if"?

I can't believe noone suggested this yet:

System.out.println("numbers from 1 to 100 without using any loops or conditions like \"if\"?");
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Check out the Divide + Conquer answer from the C# thread. It's evil, but brilliant:

How to print 1 to 100 without any looping using C#

Here is the Java version:

public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Print64Numbers();
        Print32Numbers();
        Print4Numbers();
    }

    private static int currentNumber = 0;

    private static void Print1Number() { System.out.println(++currentNumber); }
    private static void Print2Numbers() { Print1Number(); Print1Number(); }
    private static void Print4Numbers() { Print2Numbers(); Print2Numbers(); }
    private static void Print8Numbers() { Print4Numbers(); Print4Numbers(); }
    private static void Print16Numbers() { Print8Numbers(); Print8Numbers(); }
    private static void Print32Numbers() { Print16Numbers(); Print16Numbers(); }
    private static void Print64Numbers() { Print32Numbers(); Print32Numbers(); }
}
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Sure there is:

System.out.println(1);
System.out.println(2);
System.out.println(3);
System.out.println(4);
System.out.println(5);
System.out.println(6);
System.out.println(7);
System.out.println(8);
System.out.println(9);
System.out.println(10);
System.out.println(11);
System.out.println(12);
System.out.println(13);
System.out.println(14);
System.out.println(15);
System.out.println(16);
System.out.println(17);
System.out.println(18);
System.out.println(19);
System.out.println(20);
System.out.println(21);
System.out.println(22);
System.out.println(23);
System.out.println(24);
System.out.println(25);
System.out.println(26);
System.out.println(27);
System.out.println(28);
System.out.println(29);
System.out.println(30);
System.out.println(31);
System.out.println(32);
System.out.println(33);
System.out.println(34);
System.out.println(35);
System.out.println(36);
System.out.println(37);
System.out.println(38);
System.out.println(39);
System.out.println(40);
System.out.println(41);
System.out.println(42);
System.out.println(43);
System.out.println(44);
System.out.println(45);
System.out.println(46);
System.out.println(47);
System.out.println(48);
System.out.println(49);
System.out.println(50);
System.out.println(51);
System.out.println(52);
System.out.println(53);
System.out.println(54);
System.out.println(55);
System.out.println(56);
System.out.println(57);
System.out.println(58);
System.out.println(59);
System.out.println(60);
System.out.println(61);
System.out.println(62);
System.out.println(63);
System.out.println(64);
System.out.println(65);
System.out.println(66);
System.out.println(67);
System.out.println(68);
System.out.println(69);
System.out.println(70);
System.out.println(71);
System.out.println(72);
System.out.println(73);
System.out.println(74);
System.out.println(75);
System.out.println(76);
System.out.println(77);
System.out.println(78);
System.out.println(79);
System.out.println(80);
System.out.println(81);
System.out.println(82);
System.out.println(83);
System.out.println(84);
System.out.println(85);
System.out.println(86);
System.out.println(87);
System.out.println(88);
System.out.println(89);
System.out.println(90);
System.out.println(91);
System.out.println(92);
System.out.println(93);
System.out.println(94);
System.out.println(95);
System.out.println(96);
System.out.println(97);
System.out.println(98);
System.out.println(99);
System.out.println(100);
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128  
This is very sad, I don't even understand how this get so many votes. That's a typical problem of Stackoverflow imho. Trivial answers to trivial questions lead to MANY upvotes while taking 10 minutes or more to provide a detailed answer with deep explanations and references to a tricky question will bring you nothing (apart from the satisfaction of helping :) ) because many people won't even get it! –  Gregory Pakosz Jan 11 '10 at 18:48
3  
This doesn't work. Ok, it prints the numbers from 1 to 5, but what with the three dots? –  Daniel Daranas Jan 11 '10 at 19:01
68  
@Gregory I think this gets most votes because it's a straightforward, but basically useless answer to a stupid, useless question. –  Michael Borgwardt Jan 11 '10 at 19:10
26  
I don't understand why the complaint about this answer got so many upvotes! It is the simplest correct answer to the question asked! –  Kevin Bourrillion Jan 11 '10 at 19:12
13  
This is the only correct answer; every other one is using a loop of some variety (either directly or indirectly). –  Noon Silk Jan 12 '10 at 0:12
show 12 more comments

In C++:

#include <iostream>

class a {
  static unsigned i;

public:
  a() {
    std::cout << ++i << std::endl;
  }
};

unsigned a::i = 0U;

int main() {
  a array[100];
}

This solution neither uses loops nor recursion for printing numbers from 1 to 100.

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download from pastebin

System.out.println((new URL("http://pastebin.com/pastebin.php?dl=f722c7eb0")).getContent())
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Is there a way to print numbers from 1 to 100 without using any loops or conditions like "if"?

Using an optimized version of this:

System.out.println("1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 , 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 , 25 , 26 , 27 , 28 , 29 , 30 , 31 , 32 , 33 , 34 , 35 , 36 , 37 , 38 , 39 , 40 , 41 , 42 , 43 , 44 , 45 , 46 , 47 , 48 , 49 , 50 , 51 , 52 , 53 , 54 , 55 , 56 , 57 , 58 , 59 , 60 , 61 , 62 , 63 , 64 , 65 , 66 , 67 , 68 , 69 , 70 , 71 , 72 , 73 , 74 , 75 , 76 , 77 , 78 , 79 , 80 , 81 , 82 , 83 , 84 , 85 , 86 , 87 , 88 , 89 , 90 , 91 , 92 , 93 , 94 , 95 , 96 , 97 , 98 , 99 , 100"); 

Next question?

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Or if you like to use reflection :-)

public class Print100 {

    public static void emit0(int index) throws Exception {
        System.out.println(index);

        String next = new StringBuilder()
                          .append("emit")
                          .append(index / 100)
                          .toString();

        Print100.class.getMethod(next, Integer.TYPE)
                          .invoke(null, index+1);
    }

    public static void emit1(int index) {

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        emit0(1);
    }

}
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1  
Nice one, although I don't think you need to print 0 and also note that StringBuilder is overkill here. –  CurtainDog Jan 12 '10 at 2:02
add comment

Yes, it's possible, but it's terrible. There's any number of ways that will use either recursion or nested type creation, with exception handling for flow control. This has no real-world application IMO and should be avoided in real code at all costs.

Here's an example that uses recursive type instantiation with exception handling to control termination. It print the number is descending order, but that would be trivial to change to ascending, by just subtracting 99 (or whatever constant) from the value being printed.

class PrintVal
{
  // called with a list containing as many items as you want, less one...
  public PrintVal( List<int> items )
  {
      System.out.println(items.size()+1);  // print the size of the list
      try { 
        items.remove( items.size()-1 );  // will throw when items is empty
        new PrintVal( items );
      }
      catch( Exception ) { /* swallow and terminate */ }
  }
}

// setup and invocation that performs the output
ArrayList<int> strList = new ArrayList<int>( new int[99] );
PrintVal instance = new PrintVal( strList );  // all output happens here
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show 3 more comments

Building on Yacoby's answer, but without the catch. (Upvote that answer.)

public class To100 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final int max = 100;
        new java.util.concurrent.Semaphore(max) {
            void go() {
                acquireUninterruptibly();
                System.err.println(max-availablePermits());
                go();
            }
        }.go();
    }
}

Explanation:

  • Semaphore allows a specified number of permits to be acquired before blocking.
  • I didn't want to write java.util.concurrent twice, so I opportunistically extended Semaphore.
  • This uses an anonymous inner class. Anonymous does not mean it is not a type. I can therefore call a method on it that is not declared in a base type/implemented interface.
  • acquireUninterruptibly means I don't have to declare pesky checked exceptions.
  • Nobody said the program had to terminate.
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let Arrays do the job:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Object[] numbers = new Object[100];
    Arrays.fill(numbers, new Object() {
        private int count = 0;
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return Integer.toString(++count);
        }
    });
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(numbers));
}
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1  
The Java library does not appear to define the order toString is called. (Arrays.asList vs Arrays.toString doesn't seem to be very well defined, but that is another issue.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 11 '10 at 20:34
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No conditions (no short-cut boolean operators, no ?-operator, no exceptions), no loops:

import java.util.Vector;

public class PrintOneToHundered {
  static int i;
  PrintOneToHundered() {}
  public String toString() { return ++i+""; }
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Vector v1  =new Vector(); v1  .add(new PrintOneToHundered());
    Vector v2  =new Vector(); v2  .addAll(v1 ); v2  .addAll(v1 );
    Vector v4  =new Vector(); v4  .addAll(v2 ); v4  .addAll(v2 );
    Vector v8  =new Vector(); v8  .addAll(v4 ); v8  .addAll(v4 );
    Vector v16 =new Vector(); v16 .addAll(v8 ); v16 .addAll(v8 );
    Vector v32 =new Vector(); v32 .addAll(v16); v32 .addAll(v16);
    Vector v64 =new Vector(); v64 .addAll(v32); v64 .addAll(v32);
    Vector v100=new Vector(); v100.addAll(v64); v100.addAll(v32); v100.addAll(v4);
    System.out.println(v100);
  }
}

Explanation:

  • define a class, whose toString-method returns consecutive ints at repeated calls
  • create a vector with 100 elements, that are instances of the class
  • print the vector (toString-method of a Vector returns a string of the toString-values of all its elements)
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Here is one using a thread (I inflated the sleep time to account for fluctuations in system speed). I couldn't think of a way to get rid of the try / catch:

public class Counter extends Thread{

    private int cnt;

    public Counter(){
        this.cnt = 0;
    }

    private void increment(){
        System.out.println(cnt++);
        try{
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        }catch(Exception e){}
        increment();
    }

    public void run(){
        increment();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception{
        Counter cntr = new Counter();
        cntr.start();
        cntr.join(100000);
        cntr.interrupt();
        System.exit(0);
    }

}
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Ok, I'm late on this and an answer is already accepted, but I wonder why nobody has used a clean and simple counter yet?

public class Counter
{
    static Counter[] vtab = new Counter[]
    {
        new Counter(),
        new Counter() { public void print( int first, int last ) {} }
    };

    public void print( int first, int last )
    {
        vtab[ ( last - first - 1 ) >>> 31 ].print( first, last - 1 );
        System.out.println( last );
    }

    public static void main( String[] args )
    {
        vtab[ 0 ].print( 1, 100 );
    }
}

Thread safe, configurable, no exceptions, no dependance on API side effects, just plain OOP and some trivial math.


For those not familiar with binary operators here is how it works:

  • The ( x >>> n ) expression moves all bits of the integer value x to the right by n places. Lower bits simply fall off the right side by this operation and new bits that come in from the left side are always 0.

  • So the effect of ( x >>> 31 ) is to move the highest bit of x to the lowest place and to set all other bits of x to 0. The result is now always either 0 or 1 for all possible values of x.

  • As the highest bit of an int is the sign bit which is 0 for positive values and 1 for negative values, the expression ( x >>> 31 ) evaluates to 0 for all positve values of x and to 1 for all negative values of x.

  • Now if both first and last are positive numbers and if last is greater than first, the result of ( last - first - 1 ) will be >= 0 and if last == first it will be -1.

  • So ( ( last - first - 1 ) >>> 31 ) evaluates to 0 if last is greater than first and becomes 1 if they are equal.

Now this value 0/1 is used to switch between the 2 implementations of print( int first, int last ) based on the comparision of first and last. At first the recursion takes place without printing anything. print( 1, 100 ) calls print( 1, 99 ) and so on... until last equals first which causes a switch to the other implementation of print which in turn does nothing at all. So now the stack unwinds again and the values are printed on the way down in ascending order and the invocation of vtab[ 0 ].print( 1, 100 ) finishes normally.

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Here's a hint that be helpful.

The assert statement isn't the forbidden if statement.

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1  
Yes but the assertions can be easily disabled on the VM –  Greg Jan 12 '10 at 14:36
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My solution without verbosity. It doesn't use any control structure other than function application. It also doesn't use library code to help out. My code is easily extensible to print out the range [a, b]. Just change conts [n / 100] to conts [(n - a) / (b - a)] and of course change new Printable (1) to new Printable (a).

To100.java:

class Printable {
  private static final Continuation[] conts = {new Next (), new Stop ()};

  private final int n;
  private final Continuation cont;

  Printable (int n) {
    this.n = n;
    this.cont = conts [n / 100];
  }

  public void print () {
    System.out.println (n);
    cont.call (n);
  }
}

interface Continuation {
  public void call (int n);
}

class Next implements Continuation {
  public void call (int n) {
    new Printable (n + 1).print ();
  }
}

class Stop implements Continuation {
  public void call (int n) {
    // intentionally empty
  }
}

class To100 {
  public static void main (String[] args) {
    new Printable (1).print ();
  }
}

EDIT: Since this question was closed (why???) I'll post my second answer here. It is inspired by Tom Hawtin's notice that the program doesn't have to terminate. Also the question doesn't require that only the numbers 1-100 are printed (or even in order).

To100Again.java:

class To100Again extends Thread {
  private static byte n;
  public void run () {
    System.out.println (n++);
    new To100Again ().start ();
    System.gc();
  }
  public static void main (String[] args) {
    new To100Again ().start ();
  }
}
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Another divide and conquer:

public class Print100 {
    public static void main (String...args) {
        Runnable r1 = new Runnable () {
            int n;
            public void run () {
                System.out.println(++n);
            }
        };

        fourTimes(fiveTimes(fiveTimes(r1))).run();
    }

    public static Runnable twice (Runnable a) {
        return add(a,a);
    }

    public static Runnable fourTimes (Runnable a) {
        return twice(twice(a));
    }

    public static Runnable fiveTimes (Runnable a) {
        return add(a,fourTimes(a));
    }

    public static Runnable add (final Runnable a, final Runnable b) {
        return new Runnable () {
            @Override
            public void run () {
                a.run();
                b.run();
            }
        };
    }
}
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System.out.println("numbers from 1 to 100")

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show 3 more comments

Implement a recursive call incrementing and printing the number. Configure your VM to run out of stack after 100 calls. No conditions, no loops. cough ;-)

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Abuse an exception to serve as a condition.

public class Main {
    private static int[] stopper = new int[100];

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            print(1);
        } catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
            // abuse of try catch
        }
    }

    private static void print(int i) {
        System.out.println(i);
        stopper[i] = i;
        print(i + 1);
    }
}
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without any loop and condition :

public static void recfunc(int a[], int i)
{
    System.out.println(i);
    int s = a[i];
    recfunc(a, i + 1);
}

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int[] a = new int[100];

    try
    {
        recfunc(a, 1);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {

    }
}

with recursion and without if I think use "?" for conditioning :

public static int recfunc(int i)
{
    System.out.println(i);
    return (i < 100) ? recfunc(i + 1) : 0;

}


public static void main(String[] args)
{
    recfunc(1);
}
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If try and catch are legal I would think it would be easy and fairly clean to recurse and then just divide by zero when you're done. Besides all that it always rocks when you get to divide by zero both for fun and profit.

public class Main {
public static void main(String[] args) {
  count(100);
}
private static int count(int x) {
   try {
      int value=1/x;
      count(x-1);
      System.out.println(x);
   }
   catch (Exception e){
      return 0;
   }
   return 1;
}
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I'm a .Net developer but I would guess there's a Java equivalent of this...

static int i = 1;
static System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer();

static void Main(string[] args)
{            
    timer.Interval = 10;  //milliseconds
    timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);
    timer.Enabled = true;
    timer.Start();

    //let the timer complete... (3000 to show the output stops)
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.Join(3000);
}

static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i++);
    timer.Enabled = (i < 101);   
}
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1  
Though this may not comply with the no-conditionals rule because you are simply pushing those checks to a class where they're actually hidden. If you read the rule as "I don't use any conditions or loops," using a timer to do them for you becomes valid. –  Austin Salonen Jan 11 '10 at 23:36
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Didn't see this in here, using the termination order of the && operator.

public class count100 {

    public static boolean loop(int i) {
        System.out.println(100-i);
        return i > 0 && loop(i-1);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        loop(99);
    }
}
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This reminds me of programming my TI-55 years and years ago. It had 32 programmable instruction steps, and a RESET instruction that would jump to instruction zero, so simple looping could be implemented. The problem was getting it to stop, which boiled down to getting it to do an operation that caused an error, e.g., divide by zero.

Thus:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    printN(100);
}

private static void printN(int n)
{
    try
    {
        int  t = 1/n;    // Exception when n is 0
        printN(n-1);     // Recurse, down to 0
        System.out.println(n);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Stop recursing
    }
}

Note: Yes, I know this is similar to @Yacoby's solution.

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This answer is perverse enough that it doesn't even look like it will run. ;)

It gets extra text at the end of the output, but it avoid loops, conditions, main() and println(). ;)

public class OneHundred {
    private static int i = 1;
    static {
        OneHundred[] hundreds = new OneHundred[100];
        Arrays.fill(hundreds, new OneHundred(););
        Thread.currentThread().setName(Arrays.toString(hundreds).replaceAll("[\\]\\[, ]+", "\n"));
        clear("Exception in thread \""); clear("\" ");
    }
    private static void clear(String string) {
        try {
            Field f = String.class.getDeclaredField("count");
            f.setAccessible(true);
            f.set(string, 0);
        } catch (Exception ignored) { }
    }
    public String toString() { return "" + i++; }
}
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public class PrintUptoHundredWithoutIf {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread t = new Thread(task());
        t.setDaemon(true);
        t.start();
        sleep((NUMBERS_TO_PRINT * SLEEP_PERIOD_IN_MILLIS)
                + OS_SLEEP_RESPONSE_IN_MILLIS);
    }

    private static final int SLEEP_PERIOD_IN_MILLIS = 1000;
    private static final int NUMBERS_TO_PRINT = 100;
    private static final int OS_SLEEP_RESPONSE_IN_MILLIS = 110;

    public void printUptoHundred(byte seq) {
        int posVal = Math.abs(~seq);
        System.out.println(posVal);
        sleep(SLEEP_PERIOD_IN_MILLIS);
        printUptoHundred((byte) posVal);
    }

    private static Runnable task() {
        return new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                new PrintUptoHundredWithoutIf().printUptoHundred((byte) 0);
            }
        };
    }

    private static void sleep(int millis) {
        try {
            Thread.sleep(millis);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
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Does it have to be Java? If ruby's allowed:

puts [*1..100].join("\n")

I'd like to see anything this concise in Java.

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3  
Isn't ruby a higher level language than Java? –  Andrew Grimm Jan 12 '10 at 0:35
2  
Making the Java vs Ruby argument is comparing apples to oranges. –  gpampara Jan 12 '10 at 5:37
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