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Is there a way to print numbers from 1 to 100 without using any loops or conditions like "if"? We can easily do using recursion but that again has an if condition. Is there a way to do without using "if" as well? Also no repetitive print statements, or a single print statement containing all the numbers from 1 to 100.

A solution in Java is preferable.

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45 Answers

This example uses no conditions and no exceptions.
(There is a kind of hidden condition in the short-circuit OR).
Loops are avoided by using recursion.

public class OneToHundered {

  public static boolean exit() {
    System.exit(0);
    return true;
  }

  public static boolean printToHundered(int i) {
    boolean r;
    System.out.println(i);
    r = (i<100) || exit();
    printToHundered(i+1);
    return r;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    printToHundered(1);
  }
}
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1  
This uses short circuit OR. I would prefer something without using any sort of conditional expressions. –  Thunderhashy Jan 12 '10 at 0:18
show 1 more comment
public class Main {
        // prints 2 numbers starting from i  
        private static void print2(int i) { 
            System.out.println(i);
            System.out.println(i+1);
        }
       // prints 10 numbers starting from i
        private static void print10(int i) { 
            print2(i);
            print2(i+2);
            print2(i+4);
            print2(i+6);
            print2(i+8);
        }
       // prints 20 numbers starting from i
        private static void print20(int i) {
            print10(i);
            print10(i+10);
        }
        // prints 100 numbers starting from i
        private static void print100(int i) {
            print20(i);
            print20(i+20);
            print20(i+40);
            print20(i+60);
            print20(i+80);
        }

        public static void main(String[] args)  {
                 print100(1);
        } 

}

Or (among other many alternatives) :

public class Main {
        private static void print1(int i) {
            System.out.println(i);
        }
        private static void print4(int i) {
            print1(i);
            print1(i+1);
            print1(i+2);
            print1(i+3);
        }
        private static void print16(int i) {
            print4(i);
            print4(i+4);
            print4(i+8);
            print4(i+12);
        }
        private static void print64(int i) {
            print16(i);
            print16(i+16);
            print16(i+32);
            print16(i+48);
        }

        public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
                 print64(1);
                 print16(1+64);
                 print16(1+64+16);
                 print4(1+64+32);
        } 

}
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//Descending Order

class Test {
    int count = 101;

    public void printNo() {
        try {
            count = count--;
            int nw = count / count; // to prevent printing zero
            int[] array = new int[count];
            System.out.println(array.length);
            printNo();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("DONE PRINTING");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test objTest = new Test();
        objTest.printNo();
    }
}
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show 1 more comment

And then God invented Perl (larry wall actually invented it.. :-)

#!/usr/bin/perl
@range = 1..100;
print @range;
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2  
Do you mean "God invented Perl ... Larry Wall actually implemented it"? –  Andrew Grimm Jan 12 '10 at 22:16
1  
Also no repetitive print statements,or a single print statement containing all the numbers from 1 to 100. –  Puppy May 15 '10 at 17:41
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i would think there would be a java equivalent to something like the following php

$my_numbers = range(0,100);
echo implode($my_numbers, ' ');

this avoids recursion, loops, control statements, etc.

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As I said there: How to print 1 to 100 without any looping using C#

public static void f(int[] array, int n)
{
    System.out.println(array[n] = n);
    f(array, n + 1);
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    try { f(new int[101], 1); }
    catch (Exception e) { }
}
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Here's a solution that seems very simple compared to what has been posted so far. It uses short-circuit evaluation to end recursion:

public class Foo {
  static int x = 1;
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    foo();
  }

  private static boolean foo() {
    System.out.println(x++);
    return x > 100 || foo();
  }
}
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show 1 more comment
List<Integer> list = new AbstractList<Integer>() {
    public int size() { return 100; }
    public Integer get(int i) { return i + 1; }
};
System.out.println( list.toString() );
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 system("seq 1 100");

in C will give the desired result. Find the equivalent Java call to run a shell command.

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Does Clojure count because it runs on the JVM?

(range 1 101)

or:

(take 100 (iterate inc 1))

Both work directly at the REPL (which includes an implied print).

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public class Run3 
{
    public static void number(int i)
    {
    if(i==100)
    {
    return; 
    }
    else
    {
        i++;
        System.out.println(i);
        number(i);
    }
    }
public static void main(String[] args)
{
number(0);

}
}
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2  
hmm .. is it just me or is there an if in your code? –  kleopatra Apr 22 '13 at 19:27
add comment
public class Test {

static int x = 0;
public static void main(String[] args) {

    printTo100();

}
public static void printTo100(){
    if(x<=100)
    {
    System.out.println(x+"");
    x++;
    printTo100();
    }

}

}
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public class nub
 {

 static int i=1;

 public static void main(String...a)
  {

    if(i<=1000)//suppose my range is 10000
    {
        System.out.println(i);
        i++;
        main();
    }

  }

}    
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You don't need array's. You can do that with recursion.
Try this:

public class TestFile {
    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        TestFile f = new TestFile();
        f.print(100);
    }

    public void print(int x) {
        if (x > 0) {
            System.out.println(x);
            x--;
            print(x);
        }
    }
}
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show 1 more comment

Try :

int i = 1;
System.out.println(i++);
System.out.println(i++);
System.out.println(i++);
....
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3  
This is ridiculous. This exact answer ( almost identically ) was also written and that had +15 votes so far: stackoverflow.com/questions/2044033/… –  OscarRyz Jan 11 '10 at 19:16
1  
-1: If you are going to post a solution like this, you should write out the entire thing. As it is, it doesn't even compile. –  Thomas Eding Jan 12 '10 at 2:48
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