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The code I have loops through a list of tuples and displays them in what I thought would give me a nice table but instead of having a nice table when it displays them they begin to go out of formatting and look awful.

for i in range(0,(len(l)-1)):
        print("{:<30s}{:<30s}{:<6s}{:<15s}£{:>6s}".format(l[i][4],l[i][3]\
                                                    ,l[i][0],l[i][2],l[i][1]))

Here's how the spacing looks awful.

Each row is a tuple containing five variables. Is the spacing fine and it's just how my computer displays it or is there something wrong with the formatting code I've used?

Also, using formatting how do I make each one have the surname with a comma directly after it and the salary have the '£' directly before it.

Thank you.

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3  
Please write the data you are using (no, the image is not enough since I cannot copy-paste it into a terminal, and we don't have much time to copy data by hand). Also, try to write the output on a file and open it with a text editor that uses a monospaced font. In this way you can check whether it's a problem of the terminal. The formatting code should be fine except that you should really use for value in l: print("...".format(value[4], value[3], ..)) instead of iterating over the indices. If you need both the value and the index then use for i,value in enumerate(l). –  Bakuriu Dec 7 '13 at 12:56
    
Why are you using range(0,(len(l)-1)) instead of range(0,len(l))? –  martineau Dec 7 '13 at 13:17
    
@martineau why range is even used, it can be for r in l: instead –  alko Dec 7 '13 at 13:31
    
@alko: There may be a reason if the OP is trying to avoid printing the last element of the list on purpose -- it can still be done without indexing but I want to know if it's on purpose. –  martineau Dec 7 '13 at 13:33
    
JamesDonnelly: The space formatting looks basically OK. Everything won't all line up properly however unless it'se displayed with a mono-spaced font, like Courier, Consolas, Lucida Console, or Monaco, to name several. –  martineau Dec 7 '13 at 13:53

1 Answer 1

# -*- coding: cp1252 -*-

pat = "{:<30s}{:<30s}{:<6s}{:<15s}£{:>6s}"

l = [("12345",'35000','Consultant','Bart','Simpson'),
      ("12346","25000","Teacher","Ned","Flanders")]

d = dict.fromkeys(xrange(5))
for x in l:
    for i in xrange(5):
        d[i] = max(d[i],len(x[i]))
print '\n'.join('%s : %d' % item for item in d.iteritems())

pat = "{4:<%s} {3:<%s} {0:<%s} {2:<%s} £{1:>%s}"\
      %(d[4],d[3],d[0],d[2],d[1])

for x in l:
    print pat.format(*x)

But with Pandas it would be even more simple. Let me some time to add a solution with Pandas

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What problem in the OP's code are you fixing? –  martineau Dec 7 '13 at 13:58
    
@martineau From "instead of having a nice table when it displays them they begin to go out of formatting" and "Is the spacing fine and it's just how my computer displays it or is there something wrong with the formatting code I've used" , it seemed to me that he is not satisfied of the too long spaces between the columns. But reading again his question, there are requirements that aren't fulfilled in my answer –  eyquem Dec 7 '13 at 14:16

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