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i made a funcition to check positive numbers in array. and i get an error on SIZE when i call to the function and on the declaration. someone can help me to fix it pls?

here is the syntax

#include <stdio.h>
#define SIZE 20

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[],int SIZE);

void main ()
{
    int i;
    int numbers[]={0};
    int temp=0;

    printf("Enter %d numbers please\n",SIZE);
    for(i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        scanf("%d",&numbers[i]);
    }
    temp=checkpositivenumbers(numbers[],SIZE);
    printf("The number of positive numbers is %d\n",&temp);

    system("pause");
}

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[],int SIZE)
{
    int counter=0;
    int i;

    for(i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        if(numbers[i]>0)
            counter+=1;
    }
    return counter;
}
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closed as unclear what you're asking by chux, Mario, dmckee, m0skit0, undur_gongor Dec 7 '13 at 23:30

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Including the actual error message would really help. Then we'll probably tell you to look at the preprocessed code, because ALLCAPS is often used (and should be reserved) for macros. –  dmckee Dec 7 '13 at 23:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

SIZE is not a int. SIZE is a macro. You have to create an int with the value of SIZE, as such:

int sizetopass = SIZE;
...
temp=checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[],int sizetopass);
share|improve this answer

The #define directive specifies a macro identifier and a replacement list, and terminates with a new-line character. The replacement list, a sequence of preprocessing tokens, is substituted for every subsequent occurrence of that macro identifier in the program text, unless the identifier occurs inside a character constant, a comment, or a literal string.

So, if you are #define SIZE, then you don't need to pass it as an int. The compiler will replace the string SIZE with numeric value 20 wherever it will see it. It is like using the number directly in your code. What you have done, is int SIZE which is seen as int 20. I hope this clears your doubt.

Ex::

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[]);
temp=checkpositivenumbers(numbers[]);

You don't need any int SIZE anywhere. Just delete them and you are good to go. Also, read these:: Random Good stuff on Macros MACRO wiki link

You can get a lot more by just googling.

I am going to do your homework now but make sure that you understand each and every line::

#include <stdio.h>
#define SIZE 20 // You do not need to keep this but just for the sake of context, 
                // I have kept it.

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[],int iSize);

void main ()
{
    int i;
    int numbers[SIZE]={0};
    int temp=0;
    int ArraySize = SIZE ; // Instead, you can directly assign ArraySize = 20

    printf("Enter %d numbers please\n",ArraySize );
    for(i=0;i<ArraySize;i++)
    {
        scanf("%d",&numbers[i]);
    }
    temp=checkpositivenumbers(numbers,ArraySize);
    printf("The number of positive numbers is %d\n",temp);

    system("pause");
}

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[],int iSize)
{
    int counter=0;
    int i;

    for(i=0;i<iSize;i++)
    {
        if(numbers[i]>0)
            counter+=1;
    }
    return counter;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I understand but i replace int SIZE with SIZE and it is still send me message error:"expected a type specifier... and in this line: temp=checkpositivenumbers(numbers[],SIZE); expencted and expression –  user3077648 Dec 7 '13 at 13:54
    
Do not replace, just delete them. –  Abhineet Dec 7 '13 at 13:55
    
ok but i get an exersice on call to do this functions and she ask to put 2 parameters in the function: the array and the size... so how can i do it? and i still have error on temp=... –  user3077648 Dec 7 '13 at 13:57
    
Is it really a good thinking to #define a size and then to use that as integer? prompting the user for the size and using dynamic memory allocation is better, IMHO. –  Sourav Ghosh Dec 7 '13 at 14:04
    
@SouravGhosh - OfCourse it is better but I didn't want to change his logic of using MACRO. Otherwise, the whole question will go out of context. –  Abhineet Dec 7 '13 at 14:06

Really? You want to pass SIZE? If you are having a fixed size, why to use an argument?

&temp in printf? hmmm...

Her's your function prototype when its WORKING

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[], int 20);

check this now.

#include <stdio.h>
#define SIZE 20

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[SIZE]);

void main ()
{
    int i;
    int numbers[SIZE]={0};
    int temp=0;

    printf("Enter %d numbers please\n",SIZE);
    for(i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        scanf("%d",&numbers[i]);
    }
    temp=checkpositivenumbers(numbers);
    printf("The number of positive numbers is %d\n",temp);

    system("pause");
}

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[SIZE])
{
    int counter=0;
    int i;

    for(i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        if(numbers[i]>0)
            counter+=1;
    }
    return counter;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Really? Is this your solution? Kindly put it as comment. –  Abhineet Dec 7 '13 at 13:45
    
i cant use define first and cahnge the function??? i did it on class but it doesnt work now. i dont know why? –  user3077648 Dec 7 '13 at 13:50
    
and there is an error on temp=checkpositivenumbers(numbers[],SIZE); too –  user3077648 Dec 7 '13 at 13:51

you don't need pass size because you have already defined it as macro.

there are several errors your you haven't defined size of array numbers[] and you are trying to store value into it.

Probably main should return int.

while printing no of positive integers you should not pass the address of temp.

you don't need system("pause").

your code should go like this .

#include <stdio.h>
#define SIZE 20

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[]);

int main ()
{
    int i;
    int numbers[SIZE]={0};
    int temp=0;

    printf("Enter %d numbers please\n",SIZE);
    for(i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        scanf("%d",&numbers[i]);
    }
    temp=checkpositivenumbers(numbers);
    printf("The number of positive numbers is %d\n",temp);


    return 0;
}

int checkpositivenumbers(int numbers[])
{
    int counter=0;
    int i;

    for(i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        if(numbers[i]>0)
            counter+=1;
    }
    return counter;
}

You can not use a macro as variable as you are doing in function when you are writing its definition.That

share|improve this answer
    
yes but you didnt understnad.. for example exercise 2: int RemoveOdd1(int A[], int sizeA, int B[]) i need to create this function: int A is an array of numbers sizeA is the size of array and i put them to array B and do soemting (doesnt matter) based on that idea i need on exercise 1 (the question) to put the size as second parameter and not insede the array –  user3077648 Dec 7 '13 at 14:11
    
here you are mentioning sizeA. if that is size of array you can definitely do that but in your case you haven't defined sizeA.You are using SIZE as number of elements of array .if you are using SIZE as number of elements then you can use it in second function without passing it. –  vj1207 Dec 7 '13 at 14:20

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