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This is a rewrite of a former post. I now wrote a complete new project just to show the behaviour I don't understand. Below you see the code. The problem becomes visible in the test output that is at the end of this post. My assumption is that the error is located at the line marked /* PROBLEMATIC */ but I don't know how that would be wrong.

What I want to do is this:

  • create a board object boardA

  • create another one called boardB, which is a deep copy of boardA, so it refers to different Square objects in its array pos[][] (which, as the output tells me, it indeed does).

So when I output the object ids (using hashCode()) (like in the second Board copy constructor), I expect to get different hash values for each object (which I indeed get) and also different hash values for the parent of each Square object (which I DON'T). The output clarifies this, I hope.

Any ideas? Thanks.

Here's the complete test code:

public class CloneTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Board boardA = new Board();
        Board boardB = new Board(boardA.pos);

        System.out.println("boardA=" + boardA.hashCode());
        System.out.println("boardB=" + boardB.hashCode());
    }

}

class Board {
    final int boardSize = 2;
    Square[][] pos;

    /* create empty board */
    public Board() {
        pos = new Square[boardSize][boardSize];
        for(int row=0; row < boardSize; row++)
            for(int col=0;col < boardSize; col++) {
                pos[row][col] = new Square(row,col);
            }
    }

    /* copy existing board */
    public Board(Square[][] initpos) {
        pos = new Square[boardSize][boardSize];

        for(int row=0; row < boardSize; row++)
            for(int col=0;col < boardSize; col++) {

                System.out.println("initpos["+row+"]["+col+"]=" + initpos[row][col].hashCode() + 
                        " gh=" + initpos[row][col].gameHash());

                try {
                    this.pos[row][col] = initpos[row][col].clone(); /* PROBLEMATIC? */
                } catch (CloneNotSupportedException e) {
                }

                System.out.println("this.pos["+row+"]["+col+"]=" +  this.pos[row][col].hashCode() + 
                        " gh=" + this.pos[row][col].gameHash());

            }
    }

    class Square implements Cloneable {
        int row;
        int col;

        public Square(int r, int c) {
            row = r;
            col = c;
        }

        public Square clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
            Square newsquare = (Square) super.clone(); /* WRONG?*/
            return newsquare;
        }

        public int gameHash() {
            return Board.this.hashCode();
        }
    }
}

Here's a sample output:

initpos[0][0]=1598553873 gh=1874519541
this.pos[0][0]=1464824097 gh=1874519541
initpos[0][1]=546069071 gh=1874519541
this.pos[0][1]=1585252666 gh=1874519541
initpos[1][0]=1659432780 gh=1874519541
this.pos[1][0]=716609871 gh=1874519541
initpos[1][1]=973809521 gh=1874519541
this.pos[1][1]=843745660 gh=1874519541
boardA=1874519541
boardB=998786479

As you can see, the gh-values is the same (1874519541) for the initpos[0][0] and the this.pos[0][0] lines. I would expect the gh-value of this.pos[0][0] to be 998786479, which is the id of boardB.

So the cloned Square object (which has a different id as it should have) still thinks it belongs to the first Board object. But how can that be since I assign it to the new Board object inside the constructor??

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Java's clone() is tricky (if not evil), and more so with inner classes.

I think this applies:

The "proper" way is to define the clone method of the inner class with an argument of enclosing class.

Or better, forget about clone and code a copy constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
leonbloy, can you explain that with a line of code? –  jackthehipster Dec 7 '13 at 14:52
    
@jackthehipster gist.github.com/anonymous/d9de46638ac02c151bf2 would be such a method. –  zapl Dec 7 '13 at 15:04
    
Thanks leonbloy, that is an interesting solution as well. I think I understand now why my code didn't work. –  jackthehipster Dec 7 '13 at 15:09

Square is an inner class of Board. Every instance of an inner class has an implicit reference to it's outter class instance. Board.this is your case. Such an object also can not exist without it's outter instance.

Objects of inner classes therefore belong to one instance of an outter class object. And to which instance they belong to will not change. Even and especially if you clone them because cloning will clone everything.

Instead of using .clone() create a manual copy from within the new instance.

The simplest way is to provide a copy constructor. That's a constructor that takes an object of it's own type. That way you also don't need to leak out implementation details (your main method needs to know that there is an array hidden in a board).

public class CloneTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Board boardA = new Board();
        Board boardB = new Board(boardA);
    }
}

class Board {
    final int boardSize = 2;
    Square[][] pos;

    /* create empty board */
    public Board() {
        pos = new Square[boardSize][boardSize];
        for (int row = 0; row < boardSize; row++)
            for (int col = 0; col < boardSize; col++) {
                pos[row][col] = new Square(row, col);
            }
    }

    /** A copy constructor */
    public Board(Board other) {
        pos = new Square[boardSize][boardSize];
        for (int row = 0; row < boardSize; row++)
            for (int col = 0; col < boardSize; col++) {
                this.pos[row][col] = new Square(other.pos[row][col]);
            }
    }

    class Square {
        int row;
        int col;

        /** A Copy Constructor */
        public Square(Square other) {
            row = other.row;
            col = other.col;
        }

        public Square(int r, int c) {
            row = r;
            col = c;
        }

        public int gameHash() {
            return Board.this.hashCode();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
zapl, I still don't quite understand why my code didn't work, but yours does! Thanks. So cloning it seems is a bad, bad thing in Java ;-) –  jackthehipster Dec 7 '13 at 14:48
    
@jackthehipster you clone the meaning of Board.this in your code. So return Board.this.hashCode() will not change it's value. –  zapl Dec 7 '13 at 14:56
1  
ok I think I get it now... cloning will produce a new child object for the same parent object as the cloned one, am I right? I thought it would simply create a brand new object with the same properties, and by referencing it from the boardB object it would "accept" boardB as its parent (sounds silly) :) . So the reference to the parent object is in fact some hidden property of an object that gets cloned as well, isn't it? –  jackthehipster Dec 7 '13 at 15:06
    
@jackthehipster Correct. The parent object property is indeed cloned as well. –  zapl Dec 7 '13 at 15:11
    
One follow-up question: in my real program (not the example code above), Square is only one of the possible classes. There is a subclass for every possible piece in the game. So I need to copy each square without really knowing which class it belongs to. Is there a way to do something like: this.pos[row][col] = new (class of other.pos[row][col])(other.pos[row][col]); ? –  jackthehipster Dec 7 '13 at 15:22

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