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i want java code using switch to same execute ? how i can do this by java

 if(ave>=90.0)
     return 'A';
 else if(ave>=80.0)
     return 'B';
 else if(ave>=70.0)
     return 'C';
 else if(ave>=60.0)
     return 'D';
 else 
     return 'F';
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closed as off-topic by Matt Ball, Alexis C., LaurentG, Alex K, Sri Harsha Chilakapati Dec 8 '13 at 15:10

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Matt Ball, Alexis C., LaurentG, Alex K, Sri Harsha Chilakapati
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Fantastic. Write some code. –  Matt Ball Dec 7 '13 at 18:46
1  
Capital D is 68 in ascii so you may do strVar=(Math.max(Math.min(68-(90-ave)/10,65)),68).toString(); but may not work for single chars maybe only strings –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Dec 7 '13 at 18:50
    
Is lack of E intentional? –  Pshemo Dec 7 '13 at 19:12
    
@Pshemo It looks like the OP is writing some grade average to letter grade thing, so I'd say yes. –  Dennis Meng Dec 7 '13 at 19:33
    
@DennisMeng Thanks, I needed to read a little about grading system in few counties to see that not everywhere between D and F E is used. –  Pshemo Dec 7 '13 at 19:44

4 Answers 4

The intuitive solution is: It's impossible.

A switch needs a discreet set of elements. A range of numbers is infinite and you can't do

switch(something) {
case 90.0:
case 90.000000000001:
....

There is a way you could do that though: Convert the range to some number:

private static int toRangeIndex(double d) {
    if (d >= 90.0)
        return 0;
    else if (d >= 80.0)
        return 1;
    else if (d >= 70.0)
        return 2;
    else if (d >= 60.0)
        return 3;
    else
        return 4;
}

public static double sumColoumn(double[][] m, int coloumnIndex) {
    switch (toRangeIndex(ave)) {
    case 0:
        return 'A';
    case 2:
        return 'B';
    case 3:
        return 'C';
    case 4:
        return 'D';
    default:
        return 'F';
    }
}

This is obviously not better in your case. But there are cases in which you could use such a technique.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems that OP is trying to avoid if() else if().., not wrap it in separate method. –  Pshemo Dec 7 '13 at 19:01
    
@Pshemo I know. And I wouldn't do that here because it's just more code. But if you have an object that keeps it's internal state as double it would be a good idea to add such a method so that code can use a simple switch. The conversion code exists only once, code that uses converted values can exist multiple times. –  zapl Dec 7 '13 at 19:04

Not possible directly, switch requires exact match.

What you can do is write function like:

int classify(double avg) {
    // perform some if-else chain, or loop with test inside, or calculation:
    return (int)(avg/10.0);
}

Then use the return value in switch:

switch (classify (avg)) {
case 10: // average of exact 100.0 gives 10, let's not F that...
case 9:
    return 'A';
case 8:
    return 'B';
//...
default:
    return 'F';
}

But, in your specific case it is just moving the if... ladder into a different function, and probably not good idea. So don't do it :-).

Or rather, if you do it, do it because it makes code easier to understand and maintain (and here it in my opinion does not), not because you want to use switch statement.

share|improve this answer
int findIndex(double ave){
int index=(int)(ave/10.0);
if(index>=9)
    return 9;
else 
    return index;

}

switch (findIndex(ave)) {
    case 9:
        return 'A';
    case 8:
        return 'B';
    case 7:
        return 'C';
    case 6:
        return 'D';
    default:
        return 'F';
}
share|improve this answer

i finded answer

    switch(t1)
    {
    case 100: case 99: case 98: case 97:case 96:case 95:case 94:case 93:case 92:case 91:case 90:
    cr='A';
    break;
    case 89: case 88: case 87: case 86:case 85:case 84:case 83:case 82:case 81:case 80:
    cr='B';
    break;
    case 79: case 78: case 77: case 76:case 75:case 74:case 73:case 72:case 71:case 70:
    cr='C';
    break;
    case 69: case 68: case 67: case 66:case 65:case 64:case 63:case 62:case 61:case 60:
    cr='D';
    break;
    default:
    cr = 'F';
    break;    
    }
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