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So I have a general text file with some writing in it, it really ranges randomly, but I also have a wordlist that I want to compare it with and count the occurrences of each word that appears in the text file that is on the word list.

For example my word list can be comprised of this:

good
bad 
cupid
banana
apple

Then I want to compare each of these individual words with my text file which may be like this:

Sometimes I travel to the good places that are good, and never the bad places that are bad. For example I want to visit the heavens and meet a cupid eating an apple. Perhaps I will see mythological creatures eating other fruits like apples, bananas, and other good fruits.

I wish my output to generate how many times each occurrence of the listed words happen. I have a way to do this is awk and a for-loop but I really wish to avoid the for-loop since it will take forever since my real words list is about 10000 words long.

So in this case my output should be (I think) 9 since it counts total occurrences of a word on that list.

Many thanks guys! BTW the paragraph was totally random.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

For any bigger text I would definitely use this:

perl -nE'BEGIN{open my$fh,"<",shift;my@a=map lc,map/(\w+)/g,<$fh>;@h{@a}=(0)x@a;close$fh}exists$h{$_}and$h{$_}++for map lc,/(\w+)/g}{for(keys%h){say"$_: $h{$_}";$s+=$h{$_}}say"Total: $s"' word.list input.txt
share|improve this answer
    
is there a way to add the totals of the number together? – CrudeCoder Dec 7 '13 at 20:46
    
Yes, of course. – Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Dec 7 '13 at 20:55
    
I used grep and awk to add all the numbers together...I was asking if you could achieve it with the perl command in a one liner. I currently have this: perl -nE'BEGIN{open my$fh,"<",shift;my@a=<$fh>;chomp@a;@h{@a}=(0)x@a;close$fh}exists$h{$_}and$h{$_}+‌​+for/(\w+)/g}{say"$_: $h{$_}"for keys%h' word1.list word2.list | grep -o '[0-9]*' | awk '{ sum += $1 } END { print sum }' > temp.txt – CrudeCoder Dec 7 '13 at 21:36
    
also is there a way to ignore casing with your code? so like caps and a combination of cases don't matter? – CrudeCoder Dec 7 '13 at 21:39
    
Yep, I have updated code. – Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Dec 7 '13 at 23:02

For small to medium size texts you could use grep in combination with wc:

cat <<EOF > word.list
good
bad 
cupid
banana
apple
EOF

cat <<EOF > input.txt
Sometimes I travel to the good places that are good, and never the bad places that are bad. For example I want to visit the heavens and meet a cupid eating an apple. Perhaps I will see mythological creatures eating other fruits like apples, bananas, and other good fruits.
EOF

while read search ; do
    echo "$search: $(grep -o $search input.txt | wc -l)" 
done < word.list | awk '{total += $2; print}END{printf "total: %s\n", total}'

Output:

good: 3
bad: 2
cupid: 1
banan: 1
apple: 2
total: 9
share|improve this answer
    
umm my wordlist is in a text file..will i have to convert the .txt to a .list file? – CrudeCoder Dec 7 '13 at 19:18
    
no :) just use the file name of your word file. word.list and input.txt are just examples – hek2mgl Dec 7 '13 at 19:19
    
i just realized that was a dumb question haha! thanks so much! I'm going to test my text files, I have around 1000 text files to compare with the wordlist and around 10000 words in each wordlist...this was going to be slow to begin with, but I just wanted to make it more efficient. Thanks so much! – CrudeCoder Dec 7 '13 at 19:21
    
is there a way to total the numbers in the output? – CrudeCoder Dec 7 '13 at 19:22
    
The solution I've suggested isn't the fastest too. It can be improved using awk. – hek2mgl Dec 7 '13 at 19:22

An Awk solution:

awk -f cnt.awk words.txt input.txt

where cnt.awk is:

FNR==NR {
    word[$1]=0
    next
}
{
    str=str $0 RS
}
END{
    for (i in word) {
        stri=str
        while(match(stri,i)) {
           stri=substr(stri,RSTART+RLENGTH)
           word[i]++
        }
    }
    for (i in word)
        print i, word[i]
}
share|improve this answer

IF you don't need the detailed report, then this is a faster version of @hek2mgl's answer:

while read word; do
    grep -o $word input.txt
done < words.txt | wc -l

If you do need the detailed report, here's another version:

while read word; do
    grep -o "$word" input.txt
done < words.txt | sort | uniq -c | awk '{ total += $1; print } END { print "total:", total }'

Finally, if you want to match full words, then you need a more strict pattern in grep:

while read word; do
    grep -o "\<$word\>" input.txt
done < words.txt | sort | uniq -c | awk '{ total += $1; print } END { print "total:", total }'

However, this way the pattern banana will not match bananas in the text. If you want banana to match bananas, you could make the pattern match word beginnings like this:

while read word; do
    grep -o "\<$word" input.txt
done < words.txt | sort | uniq -c | awk '{ total += $1; print } END { print "total:", total }'

I'm not sure if it will be faster if we call grep with multiple words at the same time:

paste -d'|' - - - < words.txt | sed -e 's/ //g' -e 's/\|*$//' | while read words; do
    grep -oE "\<($words)\>" input.txt
done

This will grep for 3 words at a time. You can try adding more - for paste to match more words at once, for example:

paste -d'|' - - - - - - - - - - < words.txt | ...

In any case, I'd like to know which solution will be the fastest, this or the awk solution by @HakonHægland

share|improve this answer
    
Hi :) How does it output a detailed report for every word in word list? – hek2mgl Dec 7 '13 at 20:00
    
You're right, it doesn't. But does he need the detailed report? – janos Dec 7 '13 at 20:01
    
Yeah it seems so. I see a big problem with my answer: It will match bad for example, even when the word is badest. It is actually not matches whole words, it matches pattern – hek2mgl Dec 7 '13 at 20:04
    
I noticed, I'm fixing it ;-) – janos Dec 7 '13 at 20:04
    
Looks good. What does \< \> mean? (maybe stupid question but I don't know) – hek2mgl Dec 7 '13 at 20:20

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