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In short words I plan to get current dateTime, change the time and make it local to Malaysia Time by applying +0800 to timezone.

The result is unexpected :

-(NSDate *)departureDateTime
{
    NSDate *date = [NSDate date];
    NSCalendar *gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier: NSGregorianCalendar];
    NSDateComponents *components = [gregorian components: NSUIntegerMax fromDate: date];
    [components setHour: 7];
    [components setMinute: 59];
    [components setSecond: 17];

    NSDate *newDate = [gregorian dateFromComponents: components];

    NSDateFormatter *dateFormat = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    [dateFormat setDateFormat:@"yyyy-mm-dd HH:mm:ss Z"];
    [dateFormat setLocale:[NSLocale currentLocale]];


    NSString *newDateString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",newDate];
    NSString *maskString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", [newDateString substringToIndex:20]];
    NSString *append = [maskString stringByAppendingString:@"+0800"];
    NSLog(@"%@",append);


    NSDate *finalLocalDate = [dateFormat dateFromString:append];

    return finalLocalDate;
}

Results :

for NSLog Append : 2013-12-07 23:59:17 +0800

but finalLocalDate : 2013-01-07 15:59:17 +0000

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You don't seem to be setting timezone anywhere, so all the date conversions will be in terms of local timezone. And NSDate will always print in GMT. –  Hot Licks Dec 7 '13 at 22:10
    
BTW, to format months use "MM", not "mm". –  Hot Licks Dec 7 '13 at 22:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Found the answer with much shorter solution, so I posted here in case it helps anyone in future.

for returning, the problem was different time zones so by adding this line of

[components setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:(+0*3600) ] ];

we set the timezone to system time zone then we remove unnecessary codes :

-(NSDate *)departureDateTime
{
    NSDate *date = [NSDate date];
    NSCalendar *gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier: NSGregorianCalendar];
    NSDateComponents *components = [gregorian components: NSUIntegerMax fromDate: date];

    [components setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneForSecondsFromGMT:(+0*3600) ] ];
    [components setHour: 7];
    [components setMinute: 59];
    [components setSecond: 17];

    NSDate *newDate = [gregorian dateFromComponents: components];
    NSLog(@"%@",newDate);

    return newDate;
}

Correct Result : 2013-12-08 07:59:17 +0000

share|improve this answer
    
It's unclear exactly what you're doing, but if NSDate is printing in local time then you've done it incorrectly. NSDate should contain GMT. –  Hot Licks Dec 7 '13 at 22:12
    
In fact, it appears that you are setting the timezone to GMT --(+0*3600) is zero -- and hence you are not getting any timezone correction. (This is almost certainly not what you intend.) –  Hot Licks Dec 7 '13 at 22:14
    
@HotLicks every time I get the result of NSDate it -8 hours different from my system time (Malaysia). What is the reason of that? –  Ben Dec 8 '13 at 8:39
1  
Because NSDate is (almost) always in GMT. That is the way it's intended. You change timezones when you set/display it with NSDateFormatter and NSCalendar. But using those does not (or at least should not, if done properly) affect what you see when you NSLog an NSDate object -- it's always GMT. –  Hot Licks Dec 8 '13 at 13:34

try this:

NSTimeInterval now = [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSince1970];
NSDate *malaysianTime = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSince1970:now+(8*60*60)]; //8h in seconds
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Thank you, I tried it and your solution also worked. –  Ben Dec 7 '13 at 21:17

If your computer is running in the correct timezone don't set a timezone.

Create your newDate value and then --

NSDateFormatter* fmt = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
[fmt setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss Z"];
NSString* printableDate = [fmt stringFromDate:newDate];

NSLog(@"The date is %@", printableDate);

Only set a timezone (in both NSCalendar and NSDateFormatter) if the desired timezone is not the one your computer/phone is currently using.

Note that if you NSLog newDate directly it will print in GMT timezone. This is the way it's supposed to be -- you always use NSDateFormatter for a printable date. When you NSLog an NSDate directly you get GMT, by design.

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