Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question about this topic:
An istance by a inner class need everytime an object of the same tipe of the guest class of the inner class. example:

public class GuestClass {

    class innerClass {
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        innerClass test = new innerClass(); //does not work because 
                                              //i need a object of type GuestClass
        GuestClass iNeedYou = new GuestClass();
        innerClass nestClassObj = iNeedYou.new innerClass(); //it works 
    }
}

ok it's clear.
the innerClass object now points also to an GuestClass object (iNeedYou)
Now come my question:
an anonymus class is also a inner class right?
but with some difference:
A. I dont know the type of this object
B. it implements an interface.

but it is still an object by an inner class (anonymus but inner)

in fact if I do this:

public class GuestClass {
    private int numb = 100;

    class innerClass {
    }

    public void createAnAnonymusObject () {
        myInterface myAnObj = new myInterface(){
        int a, b;

        @Override
        public void print() {
            System.out.println(numb); //it works
            }};
        myAnObj.print(); 
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {                                   
        GuestClass iNeedYou = new GuestClass();
        iNeedYou.createAnAnonymusObject();  
    }
}

works because the anonymus inner object points to the outer object... so i can see the variabile numb.

but why this works?

public static void main(String[] args) {
        myInterface myAnObj = new myInterface(){ //why it works ?? in this case   
                                                 //where is the outer object?
        int a, b;

        @Override
        public void print() {

        }};     
    }

if the anonymus class is an inner class why it doesn't need an outer object?

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by EJP, Hot Licks, Andrew Medico, LaurentG, Soner Gönül Dec 8 '13 at 20:19

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What is 'myInterface'? –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 21:41
    
It can be instructive to use the javap tool (which comes with the JDK, last I checked) to dump the bytecodes produced by these different test cases. –  Hot Licks Dec 7 '13 at 21:44
    
@EJP because it mean a name of an interface -_-' –  Giovanni Far Dec 7 '13 at 21:51
    
Obviously,but you haven't provided the definition, so we are left to guess or infer that. It should have been provided in the question. –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 21:53
1  
@GiovanniFar I'm voting to close this question. You haven't posted all the relevant code, and some of what you have posted manifestly isn't the real code. You were asked several times to fix that and you haven't. -1 –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're basically asking two questions here.

Why does a non-static nested class require an enclosing instance?

Because it's assumed to have access to all non-static members of the outer class. Even if you don't actually use any of those, the compiler can't infer that the non-static nested class can be used safely in static context. You have to explicitly mark it static to allow this.

Where and what is the enclosing object of the anonymous class created in this snippet?

public class OuterClass {

  private int nonStaticMember;

  private static int staticMember;

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    MyInterface myAnObj = new MyInterface(){ //why it works ?? in this case   
                                             //where is the outer object?

    @Override
    public void print() {
       //nonStaticMember is not visible in this scope
       //staticMember is visible in this scope
    }};     
  }
}

In this case, your anonymous class has no enclosing instance. It's created in a static context, in the main method. You can instantiate MyInterface because all interfaces are implicitly static, even if defined inside another class. That's why the interface is visible at all. All of the non-static members of OuterClass, on the other hand, are not available in this scope so you're guaranteed not to use any of them. This is why there is no need to have a reference to an enclosing object. In fact, this is included in the language's specification.

Take a look at this Java Language Standard excerpt

Let C be the class being instantiated, and let i be the instance being created. If C is an inner class then i may have an immediately enclosing instance. The immediately enclosing instance of i (§8.1.3) is determined as follows.

If C is an anonymous class, then:

  • If the class instance creation expression occurs in a static context (§8.1.3), then i has no immediately enclosing instance.

  • Otherwise, the immediately enclosing instance of i is this.

(...)

I only quoted the most relevant part for this use case. Feel free to dive a little deeper into it.

share|improve this answer
    
this i understand, the question is: why the anonymus class can do that but a normal inner class no? it need the outerobject in this case, but the anonymus not! why there is this difference between them? –  Giovanni Far Dec 7 '13 at 21:30
1  
@GiovanniFar I decline to speculate without seeing all the code. –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 22:12
1  
Tom, I agree completely. –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 22:40
1  
VG +1. What a saga. –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 23:10
1  
@EJP an epic one indeed :) Thanks a lot for helping me arrive at the right answer. –  Tom Dec 7 '13 at 23:10
public class Anonymous2 {
    private int numb = 100;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyInterface myAnObj = new MyInterface(){ //why it works ?? in this case   
                                                 //where is the outer object?
        int a, b;

        @Override
        public void print() {
            System.out.println(numb); 
        }};     
    }
}

interface MyInterface {
    public void print();
}

Compiling:

C:\JavaTools>javac Anonymous2.java
Anonymous2.java:11: error: non-static variable numb cannot be referenced from a static context
            System.out.println(numb);
                               ^
1 error

As can be seen, the code that the OP claimed would compile doesn't. So this entire question is irrelevant.

share|improve this answer
    
in this way for sure doesnt work... you have to do an istance of myAnObj in a method of Anonymous2 object –  Giovanni Far Dec 7 '13 at 22:15
1  
@GiovanniFar So the code you posted isn't the real code? –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 22:21
    
it is but look better in the first post where i use myAnObj... and where i created it... look you will see that i worked in a method of an object... –  Giovanni Far Dec 7 '13 at 22:23
1  
@GiovanniFar - It proves that the last code sequence in your original post is bogus -- I just copied it and changed the class names. You ask "but why this works?", and the answer is that it doesn't. –  Hot Licks Dec 7 '13 at 22:41
    
@GiovanniFar No, it clearly is not. HotLicks has proven it. QED and +1 –  EJP Dec 7 '13 at 22:46

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.